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Written Answers

Volume 130: debated on Thursday 31 March 1988

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Written Answers To Questions

Thursday 31 March 1988

Prime Minister

Unused Land

Q38.

To ask the Prime Minister if she will pay an official visit to a publicly owned site of unused land.

Community Care

Q101.

To ask the Prime Minister what proposals she has arising from the publication of the Griffiths report for improving the co-ordination of Her Majesty's Government's policies on community care.

We are considering Sir Roy Griffiths' recommendations and will bring forward our own proposals in due course.

Terrorists (Surveillance)

Q116.

To ask the Prime Minister if, in the light of the killings in Gibraltar, she will make it her policy that future surveillance and apprehension of suspected terrorists be carried out by police officers.

It will remain the Government's policy that military assistance may be requested by a chief constable in the United Kingdom or the competent authority in a dependent territory, where this is appropriate.

Health Insurance

To ask the Prime Minister if the views expressed by the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Health, the hon. Member for Derbyshire, South (Mrs. Currie) on the ITV "This Week" programme, regarding elderly people remortgaging their houses in order to pay for private health insurance, represent Government policy.

My hon. Friend the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Health and Social Security pointed out that many elderly people have substantial capital assets. They have the option, if they choose to pursue it, of considering private health care.

Agricultural Stabilisers

To ask the Prime Minister what progress has been made on the details of the agricultural stabilisers following the recent European Council provisional agreement on extra funding; and if she will make a statement.

I refer my hon. Friend to the replies which my right hon. Friend the Minister of State, Ministry of Argriculture, Fisheries and Food gave to my hon. Friend the Member for York (Mr. Gregory) on 10 March, at columns 323–24, and to my hon. Friend the Member for Cambridgeshire, North-East (Mr. Moss) on 30 March.

European Council

To ask the Prime Minister what proposals have been tabled for discussion at the next meeting of the European Council.

The agenda for the European Council will be established by the German presidency. No formal proposals have yet been made. Completion of the single market is expected to be the main item of discussion.

Ec Expenditure

To ask the Prime Minister what is her latest estimate of the amount to be spent by the EEC in the current year, in the light of currency movements since the meeting of the European Council; and if she will make a statement.

The draft budget for 1988 established by the Council of Ministers on 7 March for total expenditure of 44·7 billion ecu (£31·0 billion) in commitments and 43·4 billion ecu (£30·1 billion) in payments. Both sums include 1 billion ecu (£693·6 million) for a monetary reserve to cover the effects on agricultural guarantee expenditure of substantial unforeseen movements in the ecu/dollar exchange rate. The European Parliament has the right under the treaty to add a further 380 million ecu (£263·6 million) in commitments and 341 million ecu (£236·5 million) in payments to the Council's figures.

Scottish Electricity Boards

To ask the Prime Minister whether the speech of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of Stale for Energy, the hon. Member for Worcestershire, South (Mr. Spicer), in Miami on 28 March represents Government policy in respect of the privatisation of the two Scottish electricity boards; and if she will make a statement.

The Government's policy on the privatisation of the Scottish electricity industry is set out in the White Paper (Cm. 327) presented to Parliament by my right hon. and learned Friend the Secretary of State for Scotland on 2 March 1988.

Companies (Names)

To ask the Prime Minister what guidelines are in force concerning contracts or dealings between Departments and companies trading under the name of serving Ministers of the Crown.

There is no guidance on dealings with companies on the basis of how they are named.

Engagements

To ask the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Thursday 31 March.

To ask the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Thursday 31 March.

To ask the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Thursday 31 March.

To ask the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Thursday 31 March.

To ask the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Thursday 31 March.

In addition to my duties in the House I shall be having further meetings later today, including one with the President of Cyprus.

The Arts

China

To ask the Minister for the Arts whether he will list the British arts companies who have performed in China in each of the last five years.

[holding answer 29 March 1988]: The following list comprises only those British arts companies which have visited China with British Council assistance. Other companies may have made their own arrangements. There are no centrally kept comprehensive records.

British Council visitors to China—Arts, 1983–87
Companies
1983–84
Royal Ballet19 Performances, Beijing, Shanghai Guangzhou
Sir Anton DolinBallet
John AlldisMaster classes, Beijing and Shanghai
Music Group of LondonMaster classes and concerts
Jane Glover and Martin IseppMaster classes
Sir Michael Tippett and Meirion Bowen
Simone MichelleDance workshop
Poster Art Exhibition
Tuckwell Wind Quintet
1984–85
Belinda Wright and JelkoProduction of "Giselle" with
YureshaCentral Ballet
Photographic Exhibition"The Petroleum Story" (five cities tour)
Rodney SlatfordDouble bass player
Royal Ballet SchoolExchange with Central Dance Academy, Beijing
European Community Youth
Orchestra
1985–86
Albion Wind Quintet
Music Group of London
John AlldisChoral conductor
David GlassMime
Noelle BarkerVoice specialist
Royal Ballet SchoolContinued exchanges
John GiorgiardisMaster classes with the China Youth Orchestra
1986–87
Gabrieli Brass Ensemble
Alberni String Quartet
Graphics UK Exhibition
Jane GloverMaster classes
Shakespeare DisplayAt Shakespeare Festival, Shanghai
Little Angel Marionette Theatre
Norman MorriceChoreographic workshop
David GlassMime
British History Exhibition
Figures for 1987–88 are not yet available.

To ask the Minister for the Arts whether he will list the Chinese arts companies who have performed in the United Kingdom in each of the last five years.

[holding answer 29 March 1988]: The following list comprises only those Chinese arts companies which have visited the United Kingdom with grants from Visiting Arts. Other companies may have visited under their own funding arrangements. There are no centrally kept comprehensive records.

Visiting Arts
Visits to Britain by Chinese arts companies (in receipt of V A grants)
YearArts groupVenue
1983–84
1984–85Chinese National Dance CompanyBillingham Festival
1985–86Two Chinese MusiciansAppearance with BBC
Welsh Symphony
Orchestra at CardiffFestival of Music
"Theatre du Petit Miroir"Prema Project
Chinese Puppet Theatre
The Emperors WarriorsEdinburgh
Chinese Terracottas
Exhibition
1986–87Peking Opera10 City tour
Fujian Hand Puppet CoVarious venues
A Pictorial History ofColchester—Royal
Chinese Dance—LectureFestival Hall London
Demonstration and Exhibition
1987–88Zigong Sichwan Opera
Troupe
Chinese Picture StoriesMuseum of Modern Art
Shanghai Kunju TheatreCardiff
Company

Rylands Library (Manchester)

To ask the Minister for the Arts what action he proposes to take to ensure that books from the Rylands library in Manchester are retained in the United Kingdom.

I do not control sales from individual libraries. However, any book which has been in this country more than 50 years and which is valued at over £16,000 requires an individual export licence. My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry has statutory responsibility for export licensing.

Library Subscription Services

To ask the Minister for the Arts, pursuant to his oral answer to the hon. Member for Hackney, South and Shoreditch (Mr. Sedgemore) of 28 March, Official Report, column 722, how many letters he has received from members of the public saying that they would like libraries to provide subscription services.

I receive many letters from the public about the public library service either directly or through hon. Members. I regret it is not possible to count and analyse all of them. A significant proportion however recommend the replacement of the present free book loan service by a system of charging, often involving an annual subscription. Some letters, recognising the educational role of the service, have suggested that charges are limited to novels.

Libraries (Premium Lending Service)

To ask the Minister for the Arts, pursuant to his oral answer to the hon. Member for Hackney, South and Shoreditch (Mr. Sedgemore) of 28 March, OfficialReport, column 722, which library authority recently drew up proposals to set up a premium lending service for newly published novels and biographies.

It is not my practice to disclose the identity of library authorities that seek my advice in confidence.

South Bank Arts Estate

To ask the Minister for the Arts what arrangements are being made for the future of the South Bank arts estate.

The Chairmen of the Arts Council and of the South Bank board have asked my consent to the setting up of an independent charitable trust to administer the south bank. With the agreement of the Lord President of the Council I have given my consent, to be effective from 1 April 1988. The charitable trust to be known as the South Bank Centre will assume the powers hitherto exercised by the South Bank board as a committee of the Arts Council. The sole trustee of the South Bank Centre will be a public limited company to be called the South Bank Board Limited, and the Arts Council will grant a lease of the south bank estate to that company, in its capacity as trustee, at a nominal rent.A report on the discharge of the responsibilities of the South Bank Centre, and its accounts, will be laid before Parliament annually, as provided by section 47 of the Local Government Act, 1985. The Accounts will of course continue to be certified by the Comptroller and Auditor General.I have appointed Mr. Ronald Grierson, who is at present chairman of the South Bank board, to be the chairman of the South Bank Centre for three years from 1 April 1988. The other members of the South Bank board have been appointed, with my approval, to be members of the South Bank Board Limited.As I undertook in an answer to a question by the hon. Member for Newham, North-West (Mr. Banks) on 14 March, at column

432, I shall be placing a copy of the trust deed setting up the South Bank Centre in the Library as soon as it has been executed.

Wales

Education Maintenance Allowance

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales how many households are in receipt of an education maintenance allowance for 16 to 19-year-olds in full-time school or further education; what is the average payment; which local education authorities are making such payments; and how many each authority has made in the last financial year.

Not all of this information is held centrally in the form requested. The only authorities which have reported expenditure on such payments in 1986–87 are Clwyd, Gwent, Mid Glamorgan and Powys.

Inner Cities

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what proportion of his Department's budget is spent in the inner cities.

Separate figures are not readily available for spending in inner city and other urban areas in Wales. However, the budget or allocations for specific bodies and programmes which concentrate on urban areas for 1987–88 include; the Welsh Development Agency, £77 million; Cardiff Bay Development Corporation, £11·5 million; the urban programme, urban development grant (including URG) and special measures for the South Wales valleys, £32·4 million.In addition, expenditure provision for main local authority programmes in Wales makes a significant contribution to spending in urban areas.

Export Breakfasts

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales how much of the £29,488 spent on his two Welsh export breakfasts was spent, respectively, on (a) the equipment, (b) the road crews, (c) the speakers and (d) the presenter.

Following the competitive tender, the contract for the two breakfast time export seminars was given to the Central Office of Information and much of the work was subcontracted. Details of the costs of the various elements of the work are commercially confidential.

Press Office

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what has been the annual cost, at constant prices, since 1985 of his Department's press office; and what is the planned future budget provision for 1988–89.

Expressed in real terms as measured by the GDP deflator at market prices using 1986–87 as the base year. the information requested is as follows:

1985–861986–871987–881988–89
£ Thousands£ Thousands£ Thousands£ Thousands
145147154156

Forestry

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales if he will make it his policy that grant money will not be paid by his Department, or through the Forestry Commission, in respect of its activities in Wales, for schemes whereby broadleaf forests are replaced by confier forests.

There is already a strong presumption in operation against the payment of grants for the conversion of broadleaved forests to conifer forests.

Local Authority Services (Competition)

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales if he will make a statement on the results of the consultation exercise undertaken in November 1987 on competition in the provision of local authority services.

All responses to the consultation exercise have now been carefully considered. As a result I propose to make the following changes to the initial proposals circulated in the consultation document. These take account of the fact that a decision on the possibility of adding sport and leisure management to the list of defined activities has not yet been taken, and therefore, if this activity is added by order, some delay in implementing competition for it is inevitable.

  • 1. The initial implementation date will be deferred from 1 April to 1 August 1989, with the second phase of implementation starting on 1 January 1990 and so on thereafter.
  • 2. The implementation of ground maintenance competition will be by five annual tranches of 20 per cent. instead of six monthly tranches of 10 per cent. as originally proposed. The initial implementation date for ground maintenance will be 1 January 1990.
  • 3. Refuse collection has been separated from other cleaning such as street cleaning, thus enabling authorities to let these activities on a different time scale from each other.
  • 4. The implementation of school and welfare catering and building cleaning will be separated by at least one year. This will reduce the burden on education authorities in the implementation of school catering and school building cleaning competition.
  • Those local authorities which responded to the consultation exercise were content with the grouping of local authorities for implementation purposes detailed in the consultation document. As a result, I do not intend to make any changes. Nor do I intend to change the £100,000 "de minimis" level suggested in the document, below which work carried out by authorities is exempt from competition.I have arranged for copies of a revised schedule arising from the proposed changes, giving details of phasing in of competition by authority, date and activitiy, to be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

    Foreign Investment

    To ask the Secretary of State for Wales (1) if he will publish in the Official Report a table showing the number of foreign-owned plants established each year in Wales since 1983, and the number in each zone which have been closed down since 1983;

    Manufacturing units in Wales 1986
    Gross Value Added as a percentage of gross outputPayments to ATC's as a percentage of gross outputPayments to Operatives as a percentage of gross outputPayments to ATC's in pounds per headPayments to Operatives in pounds per head pounds per head
    (per cent.)(per cent.)(per cent.)(pounds)(pounds)
    All units31·05·09·910,9608,181
    Japanese-owned units18·83·06·08,9796,659
    All United Kingdom units classified:
    "Electronic consumer goods and other electronic equipment not elsewhere specified"·16·64·65·310,3046,527

    Source: Annual Census of Production, 1986.

    Notes:

    ATC = Administrative, technical and clerical staff. These payments have been used to indicate salaries, and payments to operatives to indicate wages.

    The third line of figures is a more appropriate comparison for Japanese-owned units in Wales since the category is the dominant one for these units.

    (2) if he will publish in the Official Report a table showing for each year since 1983 the number of new plants established in Wales by foreign-owned firms which were not already manufacturing in other countries in the United Kingdom and the total numbers now employed in such plants compared to the numbers employed in 1983.

    [holding answer 29 March 1988]: The number of new plants and major new developments and expansions by overseas companies commenced during the period 1983 to 1987 were as follows:

    Number
    198321
    198445
    198543
    198636
    198752
    TOTAL197
    In addition to this investment, a further 17 companies were acquired by overseas investors during the period.Of the six plants which subsequently closed, three were located in Gwent, and one each in the counties of Gwynedd, Mid Glamorgan and South Glamorgan. In 1987 plants established by foreign firms since 1983, and still open, employed 3,500 as compared with 100 in 1983. However, it is not possible to say which of these firms were already manufacturing elsewhere in the United Kingdom without incurring disproportionate costs.

    Manufacturing

    To ask the Secretary of State for Wales if he will publish in the Official Report a table showing for manufacturing plants in Wales generally and for those which are owned by Japanese firms (a) the gross value added as a percentage of gross output, (b) wages and salaries, respectively, as a percentage of gross output, and (c) average wages and salaries, respectively, per head.

    [holding answer 29 March 1988]: The information is given in the following table:

    Consultancy Contracts

    To ask the Secretary of State for Wales if he will list each management or computer consultancy contract awarded by his Department in 1987, giving in each case the name of the consultancy firm and the subject of the assignment.

    [holding answer 30 March 1988]: The following centrally managed contracts were awarded by my Department in 1987.

    FirmSubject of assignment
    Inbucon Management Consultants Ltd.Financial, management and policy review of the National Museum of Wales
    Frank Griffiths AssociatesReview of Departmental Purchasing
    R. A. PengcllyReview of Welsh Dental Advisory Committee
    Burgoynes ConsultantsAtlantic Trading Estate and Barry Dock Public Inquiry
    It is not possible to identify without disproportionate costs management or computer consultancy contracts awarded in respect of projects not centrally managed.

    Nurses

    To ask the Secretary of State for Wales if he will publish a table showing (a) the establishment figures, (b) the funded establishment figures and (c) the in-post figures of each health authority in Wales for the following nursing grades: regional nursing officer 1 and 2, regional nurse 1 and 2, district nursing officer grades 1 to 7, director of nursing services grades 1 + to 6, senior nurse grades 1 + to 8, sister I, sister II, health visitor, deputy nursing sister, staff nurse, senior enrolled nurse, enrolled nurse and nursing auxiliary/assistant; and if he will publish, for each grade category, the number of employees in full-time posts, the number of part-time employees and the whole-time equivalent of those part-time employees.

    [holding answer 30 March 1988]: Only information regarding staff in post is available centrally and is given in the following table (as at 30 September 1987).

    Part-time
    Health authority/GradeWhole-time numberNumberWhole-time equivalent
    Clwyd
    Chief administrative nursing officer11
    Director of nursing services grades 1+ to 65
    Senior nurses grades 1+ to 813320·9
    Sister I1710·8
    Sister II4804529·4
    Health visitor59158·3
    Deputy nursing sister33728·6
    Staff nurse2547390245·6
    Senior enrolled nurse2
    Enrolled nurse494316208·8
    Nursing auxiliary/assistant and NNEB's3443584412·5
    East Dyfed

    Part-time

    Health authority/Grade

    Whole-time number

    Number

    Whole-time equivalent

    Chief administrative nursing officer1
    Director of nursing services grades 1+ to 64
    Senior nurses grades 1+ to 853
    Sister I19
    Sister II3244027·1
    Health visitor46105·0
    Deputy nursing sister
    Staff nurse 2271273150·4
    Senior enrolled nurse2
    Enrolled nurse276268155·3
    Nursing auxiliary/assistant and NNEB's3
    383333213·3

    Pembrokeshire

    Chief administrative nursing officer11
    Director of nursing services grades 1+ to 6
    Senior nurses grades 1+ to 817
    Sister I3
    Sister II1032720·2

    Part-time

    Health authority/Grade

    Whole-time number

    Number

    Whole-time equivalent

    Enrolled nurse663658413·0
    Nursing auxiliary/assistant and NNEB's3
    850820537·8

    Powys

    Chief administrative nursing officer11
    Director of nursing services grades 1+ to 63
    Senior nurse grades 1+ to 823
    Sister I10
    Sister II1797040·0
    Health visitor2295·2
    Deputy nursing sister2
    Staff nurse27010143·3
    Senior enrolled nurse27010143·3
    Enrolled nurse16312264·5
    Nursing auxiliary/assistant and NNEB's3
    174355228·3

    South Glamorgan

    Chief administrative nursing officer11
    Director of nursing services grades 1 + to 65
    Senior nurse grades 1+ to 811421·3
    Sister I5
    Sister II571171105·3
    Health visitor664423·7
    Deputy nursing sister12518·4
    Staff nurse2738493260·3
    Senior enrolled nurse2
    Enrolled nurse531356210·3
    Nursing auxiliary/assistant and NNEB's36891,018641·3

    West Glamorgan

    Chief administrative nursing officer11
    Director of nursing services grades 1+ to 65
    Senior nurse grades 1 + to 877
    Sister I9
    Sister II5113420·9
    Health visitor67188·7
    Deputy nursing sister3
    Staff nurse2610580333·5
    Senior enrolled nurse2
    Enrolled nurse429423260·4
    Nursing auxiliary/asssistant and NNEB's3
    301476331·4

    1 This is the highest in Welsh Health Authorities and is equivalent to a district nursing officer in England·

    2 It is not possible to give a reliable split between these two grades·

    3 NNEB's are staff holding the Certificate of the National Nursery Examination Board·

    Hospital Beds

    To ask the Secretary of State for Wales if he will list the number of beds available in Wales in each specialty in (a) 1979 and (b) for the last year for which figures are available; and if he will give the percentage increase or decrease.

    [holding answer 30 March 1988]: The information is given in the following table:

    Average daily available beds

    Specialty

    1979

    1986

    Percentage

    2

    General medicine1,620·61,697·0+ 4·7
    Paediatrics513·8473·1- 7·9
    Infectious diseases92·619·3-79·2
    Diseases of the chest725·8231·2-68·1
    Dermatology135·3131·6- 2·7
    Neurology79·172·7- 8·1
    Cardiology53·750·6- 5·8
    Physical medicine/Rehabilitation76·066·8-12·1
    Sexually transmitted diseases4·01·5-62·5
    Rheumatology69·791·4+31·1
    Geriatrics4,090·24,164·8+1·8
    Younger disabled37·233·5- 9·9
    General surgery1,873·01,768·7- 5·6
    Ear, nose and throat360·5340·1- 5·7
    Traumatic & orthopaedic surgery1,379·41,281·5- 7·1
    Ophthalmology266·9240·0-10·1
    Radiotherapy140·1166·2+18·6
    Urology98·9158·9+60·7
    Plastic surgery78·490·3+15·2
    Thoracic surgery36·519·0-47·9
    Dental surgery63·274·0+17·1
    Neurosurgery66·283·5+26·1
    Gynaecology686·2654·2- 4·7
    Obstetrics981·99110- 7·2
    Special care baby unit237·3220·7- 7·0
    Mental illness children37·030·1-18·6
    Mental handicap2,484·92,089·4-15·9
    Mental illness5,263·94,210·4-20·0
    Adolescent psychiatry45·532·0-29·7
    Pre-convalsecent303·9168·0- 44·7
    General practitioner—maternity187·4117·2-37·5
    General practitioner—medical90851,019·4+12·2
    General practitioner—dental0·10·10·0
    Unclassified52·027·5-47·1
    Staff wards11·41·3-88·6
    Intensive therapy units17·381·1+368·8
    Renal dialysis4·021·1-427·5
    Burns surgery36·034·7-3·6
    Short stay unit11·238·9-247·3
    Cardiac surgery15·923·3-46·5
    Psycho-geriatric184·7458·2+148·1
    Chronic sick4·38·0+86·0
    Haematology17·758·9+232·8
    Continuing care (cancer)8·334·3+313·3
    Medical Research Council9·88·1-17·3
    Spina bifida unit11·511·6+0·9
    Polish patients74·0n·a·
    Elderly mentally infirm10·010-00·0
    Pain clinic2·2n·a·
    Programmed investigation unit3·1n·a·
    Coronary care13·2n·a·
    War pensioners56·719·8-65·1
    High dependency unit10·0n·a·
    Spinal injuries39·1n·a·
    Miners treatment centre7·3-100·0
    Total123,456·121,686·2-7·5

    1 Individual specialty figures may not add to total due to rounding·

    2 Increase/decrease·

    n.a. Not applicable.

    Mink Farms

    To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what steps he is taking to ensure that all mink farms in Wales comply with the terms of the Mink Keeping Order 1987; and if he will make a statement.

    [holding answer 30 March 1988]: The Mink (Keeping) Order 1987, prohibits the keeping of mink on certain offshore islands of Great Britain and in certain areas of Scotland and prohibits the keeping of mink in the rest of Great Britain except under licence. Any new premises to he used as a mink farm are inspected after an application for a licence is received or if it becomes known that mink are being kept in captivity. In considering an application for a licence my officials would wish to be satisfied that the mink are to be kept in the manner prescribed in the Mink (Keeping) Regulations, 1975, as amended. Any other relevant factors would also be taken into account including the likely impact on farming and wildlife if mink were to escape from captivity. Licences are valid for a period of up to 12 months. There are powers of revocation.

    Energy

    Inner Cities

    To ask the Secretary of State for Energy what proportion of the energy programme is spent in the inner cities.

    Parliamentary Questions

    To ask the Secretary of State for Energy if, in the light of the new £250 limit on resourcing the answers to parliamentary questions, he will review all replies given since June 1987 that gave no substantive answer on the grounds that such were only possible at disproportionate cost, to ascertain whether substantive replies may now be given following the resource increase.

    Ministerial Interview

    To ask the Secretary of State for Energy if he will seek to obtain from the BBC copyright permission to place in his departmental library a copy of the interview on the Radio Four "Today" programme broadcast on 28 March, with the hon. Member for Worcestershire, South (Mr. Spicer) the Under-Secretary of State, on opportunities for United States commercial investment in the privatised United Kingdom nuclear programme.

    No. I understand that the Library of the House does obtain transcripts from the broadcasters on behalf of hon. Members.

    Power Station Statistics

    To ask the Secretary of State for Energy what is the uranium charge of each operating Magnox and advanced gas-cooled reactor in the United Kingdom; what will be the expected figure for the pressurised water reactor plants to be constructed; and how much plutonium he estimates will be produced by each during the effective life of the stations.

    For the uranium charges for Magnox and advanced gas-cooled reactors, I refer the hon. Member to the reply by the hon. Member for Midlothian (Mr. Eadie) to my hon. Friend the Member for Bedfordshire, North (Sir T. Skeet) on 14 December 1977 at column 218. I understand that the core of a pressurised water reactor of the type under construction at Sizewell B requires approximately 500 tonnes of natural uranium in its manufacture.The lifetime production of plutonium during the life of any nuclear station is dependent on its load factor and assumed lifetime. In evidence to the Sizewell inquiry, a copy of which has been placed in the House Library, British Nuclear Fuels plc estimated that the total lifetime production of plutonium from the United Kingdom's civil Magnox and advanced gas-cooled stations will amount to some 78 tonnes. The amount of plutonium produced by a PWR station similar to Sizewell B during its lifetime was estimated to be about 8 tonnes.

    Nuclear Waste

    To ask the Secretary of State for Energy, assuming that no fuel elements were reprocessed in the United Kingdom, what accumulated tonnage of untreated nuclear fuel elements would have to be stored; and on the basis of reprocessing, what tonnage of waste will have accumulated in the United Kingdom by 1991, taking into account all types of operating nuclear power plants.

    Spent fuel currently stored under water in the United Kingdom will have to be reprocessed for safety reasons. Details on the volumes of raw wastes arising from reprocessing to the year 2029 were published in the eighth annual report of the Radioactive Waste Management Advisory Committee. This is available in the House Library. The relevant table is table 5, appendix F.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Energy (1) what was the total throughput of spent Magnox fuel, expressed in terms of uranium content, which was reprocessed at BNFL Sellafield in each year from 1979 to 1987, by financial year;(2) what was the total throughput of spent Magnox fuel, expressed in terms of uranium content, which was reprocessed at the Windscale reprocessing works in each financial year from 1963–64 to 1969–70;(3) what was the total throughput of spent Magnox fuel, expressed in terms of uranium content, which was reprocessed at the BNFL Sellafield in each of the financial years 1977–78 and 1978–79.

    I refer the hon. Member to the reply given by my hon. Friend the Member for Eddisbury (Mr. Goodlad) to the hon. Member for Islington, South and Finsbury (Mr. Smith) on 11 December 1985 at columns 638–39, to the reply given by my hon. Friend the Member for Worcestershire, South (Mr. Spicer) to the hon. Member for Newport, West (Mr. Flynn) on 1 February 1988 at columns 473—74, and the reply I gave to the hon. Member for Colne Valley (Mr. Riddick) on 16 December 1987 at column 516.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Energy, what is his estimate of the likely stockpiling of plutonium resulting from reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from United Kingdom reactors over the next 10 years.

    Production of plutonium from reprocessing of irradiated fuel from United Kingdom civil magnox reactors is expected to continue at a rate of 1·5 to 2 tonnes per year for the next 10 years. Reprocessing of irradiated fuel from United Kingdom AGR reactors, which is expected to commence in the 1990s is expected to produce up to 5 tonnes of plutonium over the next 10 years.

    Bradwell Reactor

    To ask the Secretary of State for Energy what are the implications for other electricity board Magnox reactors on the grid of the decision to close the Central Electricity Generating Board Magnox reactor at Bradwell; and if he will make a statement.

    The Health and Safety Executive's nuclear installations inspectorate has listed a number of measures that the Central Electricity Generating Board will need to take to allow continued operation of the Bradwell reactors after certain dates. I understand that the CEGB is considering what action to take: no decision to close Bradwell has been taken. Work on long-term safety reviews of other Magnox reactors is in hand and the NII's decisions on these will be announced in due course.

    Trade And Industry

    Industry Regeneration (Lewisham)

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster if he will put forward proposals to regenerate industry in Lewisham.

    Industry in Lewisham, as elsewhere, stands to benefit from all we are doing to create a climate that stimulates enterprise, cuts red tape, encourages healthy competition and expands markets for British products and services. The business consultancy scheme which we launched earlier this year, under the enterprise initiative, can help small and medium-sized firms improved their performance and profitability. Lewisham is an urban programme area with a programme of £1·95 million proposed for 1988–89. As a result of this status, eligible companies there qualify for the higher rate of assistance under the enterprise initiative and may also submit projects for city grant. The borough was also the finishing point this year for our national US roadshow, offering detailed guidance on the United States' market to local exporters.

    British Steel (Privatisation)

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what progress has been made in the preparations for the privatisation of British Steel.

    The British Steel Bill is currently in Committee. Other preparations for privatisation are also proceeding, and a number of Government advisers have been appointed.

    Manufacturing Industry (Exchange Rate)

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what assessment he has made of the effects of a high exchange rate on British manufacturing industry; and what is his expectation of the effect on Anglo-German trade in manufactured goods of a sustained exchange rate of the pound sterling equalling over 3 deutschmarks.

    The exchange rate is only one of many factors affecting performance in manufacturing, as Germany's experience confirms. The outlook for United Kingdom manufacturing output, investment and exports generally is one of continuing growth. Our improved performance in areas such as quality, design, and reliability is particularly relevant to the demands of the German market.

    Inner Cities

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what proportion of the trade and industry programme is spent in the inner cities.

    My Department plans to spend £1,250 million in 1988–89. All its programmes take account as appropriate of the needs of the inner cities. Inner cities will in particular benefit from the enhanced rate of support for business development consultancies under the enterprise initiative. But it is not possible in every case to identify that proportion of the budget which is spent in the inner cities. However expenditure by the inner cities unit and grant in aid for English Estates new managed workshop programme are solely directed at inner city areas and this will amount to £27 million in 1988–89.

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster (1) if he will list in the Official Report which wards of which local authorities he treats as part of the inner cities;(2) which local authorities, or parts of local authorities, are covered by the inner cities;(3) which areas of the United Kingdom are not eligible for assistance under the action for cities programme.

    The areas for action for most of the cities programmes are shown in the map in the "Action for Cities" document, copies of which have been placed in the Library and Vote Office, and distributed to Members of the House with urban constituencies. Some programmes or initiatives, such as the urban development corporations, urban programme, enterprise zones, and inner city task forces, operate within precisely defined boundaries. For urban programme purposes, priority areas are either formally defined, in the case of partnership areas, or agreed with local authorities in order to target resources through inner area programmes. Urban programme areas are also used to target some other forms of support including special assistance under the enterprise initiative. Support through other programmes, such as housing association grant and estate action is available more widely, but is concentrated in inner cities.

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster if he will give for each inner city area, and for inner cities in total, the population, employment, unemployment, child population, school population and pensioner population.

    Figures are available only for urban programme areas and not for any other definition of inner city areas. Those figures are shown in the tables. Table 1 gives the latest available estimates of numbers of employees, taken from the September 1984 census of employment. The results of the September 1987 census are expected to become available next year. Table 2 gives estimated district level unemployment percentage rates for November 1987, using 1981 census data on population as the denominator. Table 3 gives the usually resident self-employed population aged over 16, drawn from the 1981 census. Table 4 gives OPCS population estimates for mid 1986, broken down (i) for under 15s, (ii) for those of pensionable age.

    Employees in employment:1September 1984
    Local authority district2Number (thousands)
    Birmingham473·9
    Hackney79·9
    Islington114·5
    Lambeth129·1
    Liverpool219·7
    Manchester270·0
    Salford89·1
    Newcastle upon Tyne152·1
    Gateshead67·5
    Barnsley73·0
    Blackburn55·4
    Bolton87·9
    Bradford173·6
    Brent97·4
    Bristol197·6
    Burnley33·1
    Coventry124·7
    Derby106·2
    Doncaster94·8
    Dudley92·9
    Greenwich64·8
    Halton41·8
    Hammersmith77·2
    Haringey58·4
    Hartlepool29·0
    Kensington and Chelsea83·6
    Kingston upon Hull105·4
    Kirklees121·5
    Knowsley53·5
    Langhaurgh44·2
    Leeds294·7
    Leicester159·5
    Lewisham59·6
    Middlesbrough50·0
    Newham68·3
    North Tyneside63·7
    Nottingham156·2
    Oldham69·4
    Plymouth94·8
    Preston66·6
    Rochdale68·9
    Rotherham77·1
    St· Helens59·4
    Sandwell129·1
    Sefton79·7
    Sheffield218·0
    South Tyneside42·6
    Southwark130·7
    Stockton-on-Tees60·4
    Sunderland94·4
    The Wrekin42·6
    Tower Hamlets81·1
    Walsall102·5
    Wandsworth83·3
    Wigan85·7
    Wirral88·1

    Local authority district

    2

    Number (thousands)

    Wolverhampton101·6
    Total all 57 districts6,040,100

    1 The figures exclude the self employed and members of Her Majesty's forces·

    2 The districts are defined in terms of ward boundaries as at 1984

    District level unemployment: percentage rates

    per cent.

    Birmingham15·85
    Hackney21·06
    Islington17·57
    Lambeth16·65
    Liverpool20·98
    Manchester19·01
    Salford13·44
    Newcastle16·87
    Gateshead13·61
    Barnsley15·01
    Blackburn11·46
    Bolton11·39
    Bradford11·61
    Brent11·63
    Bristol10·95
    Burnley94·8
    Coventry13·85
    Derby12·46
    Doncaster15·86
    Dudley10·49
    Greenwich11·57
    Halton16·05
    Hammersmith and Fulham13·80
    Haringey14·35
    Hartlepool17·35
    Kensington and Chelsea11·20
    Kingston upon Hull16·74
    Kirklees9·36
    Knowsley19·71
    Langbaurgh16·28
    Leeds10·50
    Leicester11·47
    Lewisham13·00
    Middlesbrough19·44
    Newham14·27
    North Tyneside13·46
    Nottingham15·56
    Oldham10·10
    Plymouth12·09
    Preston10·96
    Rochdale10·92
    Rotherham14·65
    St. Helens13·87
    Sandwell14·00
    Sefton12·88
    Sheffield14·82
    South Tyneside17·54
    Southwark17·26
    Stockton on Tees15·38
    Sunderland17·67
    The Wrekin14·25
    Tower Hamlets20·28
    Walsall12·16
    Wandsworth9·90
    Wigan12·34
    Wirral14·38
    Wolverhampton15·50

    Usually resident population aged 16+

    Self-employed

    District

    Number

    Birmingham25,035
    Hackney6,438

    District

    Number

    Islington6,740
    Lambeth9,078
    Liverpool10,543
    Manchester11,341
    Salford6,637
    Newcastle upon Tyne6,147
    Gateshead4,207
    Barnsley5,521
    Blackburn4,969
    Bolton9,483
    Bradford15,901
    Brent12,061
    Bristol12,163
    Burnley3,324
    Coventry7,288
    Derby5,141
    Doncaster7,615
    Dudley9,355
    Greenwich6,371
    Halton2,197
    Hammersmith and Fulham6,933
    Haringey9,503
    Hartlepool1,877
    Kensington and Chelsea9,433
    Kingston upon Hull4,763
    Kirklees13,401
    Knowsley2,755
    Langbaurgh2,979
    Leeds23,026
    Leicester8,175
    Lewisham7,781
    Middlesbrough2,582
    Newham5,744
    North Tyneside4,613
    Nottingham6,373
    Oldham8,007
    Plymouth6,868
    Preston4,334
    Rochdale7,534
    Rotherham5,892
    St. Helens4,265
    Sandwell6,381
    Sefton10,295
    Sheffield14,222
    South Tyneside3,060
    Southwark6,510
    Stockton-on-Tees3,508
    Sunderland5,587
    The Wrekin3,569
    Tower Hamlets4,853
    Walsall7,883
    Wandsworth10,631
    Wigan9,028
    Wirral9,882
    Wolverhampton6,318
    Total436,120

    Source: 1981 Census of Population.

    Mid-1986 Population Estimates (OPCS)

    (Thousands)

    Local Authority Area

    Total Population

    Age Group

    0–1560–65+
    Birmingham1,004·1219·4177·0
    Hackney187·141·630·0
    Islington168·030·928·1
    Lambeth245·047·140·1
    Liverpool483·099·092·1
    Manchester451·492·681·7
    Salford239·348·746·1
    Newcastle281·454·254·9
    Gateshead207·340·738·9
    Barnsley222·246·439·4
    Blackburn139·133·524·0

    Local Authority Area

    Total Population

    Age Group

    0–1560–65 +
    Bolton261·658·845·1
    Bradford463·1108·578·9
    Brent255·751·839·9
    Bristol391·574·776·9
    Burnley88·219·516·3
    Coventry310·466·254·4
    Derby216·246·538·9
    Doncaster289·361·747·8
    Dudley300·960·250·8
    Greenwich217·846·338·5
    Halton123·230·117·6
    Hammersmith and Fulham150·825·626·8
    Haringey196·138·830·8
    Hartlepool90·719·615·2
    Kensington and Chelsea137·419·721·7
    Kingston upon Hull258·056·647·0
    Kirklees376·682·365·6
    Knowsley163·839·623·1
    Langbaurgh146·832·622·9
    Leeds710·9142·7131·4
    Leicester281·163·949·4
    Lewisham232·045·643·6
    Middlesbrough144·343·822·5
    Newham205·246·632·9
    North Tyneside192·337·838·2
    Nottingham277·857·150·4
    Oldham220·048·738·4
    Plymouth256·052·444·4
    Preston125·026·823·5
    Rochdale206·647·633·8
    Rotherham252154·840·9
    St· Helens187·939·931·0
    Sandwell301·163·555·9
    Sefton298·059·857·9
    Sheffield534·397·91079
    South Tyneside156·930·730·7
    Southwark216·042·540·6
    Stockton on Tees175·839·525·3
    Sunderland297·765·648·0
    The Wrekin130·230·818·4
    Tower Hamlets152·833·625·3
    Walsall261·855·642·5
    Wandsworth257·147·045·9
    Wigan306·666·250·1
    Wirral334·869·765·1
    Wolverhampton251·954·044·8

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster (1) what was the expenditure of each Department in the inner cities in each year since 1978–79;(2) what was the expenditure of each Department on the inner cities planned for 1988–89; and what is the estimated outcome for 1986–87 and 1987–88;(3) if he will state the expenditure for 1988–89 and all the years of the public expenditure White Paper spent by each Department as part of the inner cities programme.

    Information on inner city expenditure by Departments is not available on a consistent basis before 1988–89. Final decisions have not been taken on the proportion of planned expenditure which will be directed to inner cities for later years of the public expenditure survey. My right hon. Friends are responding individually to the hon. Member on the proportion of their Department's expenditure directed at inner cities. We estimate that some £3,000 million will be directed to the inner cities through the programme and initiatives described in the "Action for Cities" document, copies of which are available in the Library of the House.

    Mr Peter Luff

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster if he will specify what steps he has taken to ensure that the departmental duties of the special adviser, Mr. Peter Luff, are not compromised by the investigation of his former employers by his Department into possible illegal takeover conduct; and when these steps were taken.

    It has been established practice, followed in Mr. Luff's case, that special advisers should not at any time have access to information about companies for whom they worked.

    Export Credits Guarantee Department

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster if he will reinstate Export Credits Guarantee Department cover to Nicaragua; and if he will make a statement.

    Cover is available for short term business (up to 180 days credit) subject to the security of confirmed irrevocable letters of credit. The position on cover for medium-term business is kept under review.

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster which Central and South American countries are currently covered by the Export Credits Guarantee Department.

    Some cover is currently available, subject in some cases to payment security, for all Central and South American countries except Argentina.

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster when Nicaragua ceased to be covered by the Export Credits Guarantee Department; and how long cover had been provided prior to its cessation.

    Medium-term cover for Nicaragua was withdrawn in October 1978 because of the economic problems caused by the war and the acute shortage of foreign exchange. Prior to that date such cover had been available over a continuous period. Short-term cover (up to 80 days) remain available subject to the security of confirmed irrevocable letters of credit.

    Fida 88 Exhibition, Chile

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what level of support was given to British companies exhibiting at Fida 88 in Chile; and what companies were involved.

    The Government provided no financial support for companies exhibiting at the Fida trade fair.

    Action For Cities Initiative

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster when he expects to hold the first working breakfast in his action for cities initiative; and what is the location.

    The first working breakfast following the announcement of the Government's action for cities initiative will be held at Newcastle on Wednesday 13 April 1988.

    Ec Countries

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how many committees have been established under the process of unifying standards throughout the European Community, on which subjects and how many of the chairmen are British.

    Standardisation in Europe is carried out by two bodies — the European Committee for Standardisation (CEN) for non-electrical products, and the European Committee for Electrotechnical Standardisation (CENELEC) for electrical products.According to our latest information, CEN has 90 technical committees, of which 11 are chaired by the United Kingdom, while CENELEC has 44 technical committees of which 11 are chaired by the United Kingdom.

    Letter Post

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what progress has been made by the Post Office in the implementation of the recommendations made in the Monopolies and Mergers Commission's report on the letter post service; and if he will make a statement.

    The Monopolies and Mergers Commission's report on the letter post service of the Post Office in the head post office areas of Glasgow, Belfast and Cardiff and in the numbered London postal districts (Cmnd. 9332) was published in September 1984. The report made 78 recommendations covering quality of service, financial control, costing and forecasting, mechanisation and manpower and industrial relations. Of the 78 recommendations, 76 were accepted by the Post Office. The Commission was also asked to include in its report a view on whether the Post Office was pursuing a course of conduct which operated against the public interest. It concluded that it must suspend judgment on this since so much depended on what was achieved in the following years.The Post Office has now produced its three-year report on progress in implementing the MMC's recommendations and I am placing copies in the Library of the House. The Post Office reports that it has implemented the great majority of the 76 recommendations it accepted.There are still certain recommendations where further work is required, several of which the Post Office declared at the outset would take longer to implement, and my Department will continue to monitor progress. The Post Office reports eight recommendations as still undischarged. One of these recommendations, that the Post Office should seek to increase post code usage to 70 per cent. of all mail, has been accomplished since the Post Office reported on progress in September. Of the remainder, three concern the establishment of standard times and costs and a productivity scheme based on standard times. This is an area in which the Post Office has experienced many industrial relations problems, but I am glad to say the work measurement scheme is now proceeding well and I understand that the new bonus scheme introduced as part of the agreement concluded between the Post Office and its unions in December on a shorter working week will form a better basis for the introduction of a full standard-based scheme.The other recommendations which remain undischar-ged concern quality of service, the introduction of a computerised system for manpower statistics, the computerisation of the system for recording and notifying weights of airmail bags and the replacement of sorting machines at the Post Office's foreign section with modern equipment. While there has been an improvement in quality of service since the report was made, both in the intra-London service and nationally, it is disappointing that the Post Office has continued to fail to meet its targets. As the Post Office comments in its progress report, a factor in this has undoubtedly been the high level of unofficial industrial disputes in recent years. On the other recommendations, although there are plans for their implementation, it is disappointing that the introduction of the new systems and machinery required has been so long delayed.There are also several recommendations recorded as discharged, particularly those relating to the introduction of better costing information for management, on which, while I acknowledge that the Post Office has done much towards carrying out the MMC's recommendations, further long-term work remains to be done. I shall continue to monitor progress in all these areas.I do, however, acknowledge and welcome the significant progress that has been made over the three years since the MMC reported, particularly in the introduction of mechanisation and improved working methods. It was largely because of failure to implement recommendations in these areas made in its 1980 report on the inner London letter post that the MMC was led to conclude that it should suspend judgment on the question whether the Post Office was operating against the public interest. I also acknowledge the Post Office's creditable track record over the period in terms of price control, growth in business, profitability and employment creation.

    Consultancy Contracts

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster if he will list each management or computer consultancy contract awarded by his Department in 1987, giving in each case the name of the consultancy firm and the subject of the assignment.

    [holding answer 30 March 1988]: The following is the list for the 1987 calendar year:

    Human Resource Development Ltd.— Footwear Industry Study.
    Technical Change Centre—The success of R & D projects.
    Admiral Management Services Ltd., Software Sciences Ltd. —Commercial Computer Security work.
    Patrick Associates—Vanguard Awareness.
    Computer Sciences Co. Ltd. — Patent Office Computer project.
    General Technology Systems Ltd. — Co-ord of IT programmes.
    Metron Technology Ltd.—Computer Capacity Planning.
    PA Technology (Cambridge)—Study of Industrial Growth Industry.
    GEC Transportation Projects Ltd.—Transport study.
    Software Sciences Ltd.—Computer study.
    Coopers & Lybrand Associates — Effectiveness of Innovation centres.
    National Computing Centre Ltd.—Starts Programme.
    Expertech Ltd.—Expert Systems Feasibility.
    C. M. I. (UK) Ltd.—Study of management, education and training.
    A. S. I. UK Ltd.
    National Computing Centre Ltd.—Information Systems.
    John Drew Tucker Associates—High Definition Television.
    P A Technology (Cambridge) — Advice on Inner Cities initiative.
    Price Waterhouse Associates—Organisational studies.
    Agriconsult—Safety study: Fire resistance.
    Best Grange Ltd.—Efficient Ship programme.
    Admiral Computing Group — Software Standards & Quality advice.
    Organisation and System Innovation Ltd. — Application Study
    FRH Associates—Intelligent Knowledge based systems
    Taylor Nelson Applied Futures — Home of the future project
    AMP Systems Ltd.—Company Information Database
    Sherington Software Ltd.—Trade Fairs Computer Schemes
    Concurrent Computer Corporation Ltd. — Capacity plan-ning study
    PA Computers and Telecommunications — Evaluation of UK Communications
    Technical Change Centre—Engineering Research in EEC
    Logica UK Limited—Computer Project for Fixed Services
    Technical Change Centre — Study of UK Science in key areas of research
    Logica UK Limited—Satellite Communications Study
    T. William Olle Associates—Database Standards
    PA Technology—Sets Study
    Cap Industries Ltd.—OSI Upper Layer Architecture
    British Telconsult—Advisory Services
    Segal, Quince Wickstead—Support for Design Scheme
    Prognosis Ltd.—Semi-conductor study
    Ewbank Preece Group Ltd.—Overseas Project Monitoring Advice
    Patrick Consulting Associates—Quality Assurance Study
    Neotech Associates—Large Scale Demonstrator project
    The Institute of Mechanical Engineers — Demonstrator project
    Prognosis Ltd—Semi-conductor layers on silicon study
    Scientific Generics Ltd.—Nanotechnology Project
    National Computing Centre Ltd. — Computer graphics study
    KPMG Peat Marwick McLintock — OSI Demonstration project
    Kennedy and Donkin Power Systems Ltd. — Overseas project evaluation
    Hollobone Hibbert and Associates—Computing Database preparation
    General Technology Systems Ltd.—Space Cost Study
    Mott, Hay and Henderson International—Overseas project study
    Computer Market Communications — Super Computer Research
    British Telecom Research Laboratories — Cellular Radio consultancy
    Spicer and Pegler Associates—Strategy study
    Metron Technology Ltd.—Computer Capacity Study
    Xionics Limited—Internal Network
    Inbucon Management Consultants Ltd. — Awareness Statistical Survey
    March Consulting Group—Maintenance UK Study
    Brown and Root Vickers Ltd.—Purchasing Consultancy
    Met Ocean Consultancy Ltd. — Resources from the Sea Study
    PA Technology—Programme advice
    CAP Ltd.—Advice on use of RPCTE implementation
    WS Atkins and Partners—Advice on EC Public Purchasing procedures
    Alpha Industrial Electronics Consultants Ltd. — Large demonstrator programme
    British Telecom Research Laboratories—OSI Opportunity Study
    Organisation and System Innovations Ltd.—Strategy for Expert EC Systems
    Human Resource Development Ltd.—Footwear Industry project
    Further Education Unit—CNC Machine Tools in Further Education Study
    Price Waterhouse Associates — Software Standards and certification study
    HR International — Top management programme and advice on deregulation assistance
    Coopers & Lybrand Associates — Organisation of DTI Surface Mount Club
    March Consulting Ltd. — Managed Workshop Feasibility Study
    Logica Ltd.—Quality Management Systems study
    Laser-Scan Labs Ltd.—Advice on computer graphics
    Telecomputing PLC—Interface Standard
    Coopers & Lybrand Associates — UK Electronic Components Industry Survey
    Communications Complex Design Ltd. — Product Design Trends & Accidents Study
    Collins Oil & Gas Consultancy Ltd. — Purchasing consultancy
    Touche Ross & Co.—Feasibility Study
    Technical Audit Ltd. — Register of UK Quality Assessed Companies Study
    Organisation and System Innovations Ltd. — VADS Training Study
    London Transport International — Overseas Transport Study
    Data Dictionary Systems Ltd.—Draft ISO Standard
    Organisation and System Innovations Ltd.—Guidelines for Selection of expert Systems Applications
    Logica UK Ltd—Vanguard-computer studies
    ISC Electronic Systems Ltd.—Vanguard-UK Construction Industry Study
    Plessey Telecommunications & Office Systems Ltd. —Cellular Radio Study
    Coopers & Lybrand Associates; Ernst & Whinney Management Consultants—Enterprise initiative services
    KPMG Peat Marwick McLintock — Review of Foreign Inward Investment Agencies
    International Computers Ltd. (UK)—ICL advice on MAIL Network
    Wallace Ltd.—Radio Spectrum Review
    Organisation & System Innovations Ltd. — VanguardVADS Communities
    Arthur D. Little Ltd.—Vanguard-VADS Communities
    KPMG Peat Marwick McLintock — Vanguard-VADS Communities
    Langton Ltd.—Vanguard-VADS Communities
    Hoskyns Group Plc—Vanguard-VADS Communities
    PA Computers & Telecommunications Ltd. — VanguardVADS Communities
    CAP Ltd.—Vanguard-VADS Communities
    SCICON Ltd.—Vanguard-VADS Communities
    Price Waterhouse Associates — Vanguard-VADS Communities
    Coopers & Lybrand Associates — Vanguard-VADS inter-working study
    Baker & Smith Ltd.—Vanguard Community Development Programme

    Regional Aid

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what has been the total spending, and the number of cases assisted in Houghton and Washington, through (a) regional selective assistance and (b) regional development grant from 1984 to 1987, broken down into manufacturing and service industries.

    [holding answer 29 March 1988]: The information requested on regional selective assistance and regional development grant in Houghton and Washington' from 1984 to 1987 is as follows:

    ManufactureService
    Regional Selective Assistance2
    Expenditure (£ million)3·60·5
    Number of cases assisted
    Regional Development Grant3403
    Expenditure (£ million)3·70·8
    Number of cases assisted21541
    1 Interpreted as the parliamentary constituency of Houghton and Washington.
    2 Project and training grants only. Information on the Business

    Improvement Services and Exchange Risk Guarantee Schemes is not available at the local level.

    3 Detailed data are available only for the revised scheme, introduced in November 1984. However, £15·7 million was paid under the original scheme to companies in the Houghton and Washington employment office areas during the period in question.

    Education And Science

    Capitation Payments

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science what information he has as to capitation paid to (a) primary and (b) secondary schools in (i) the Inner London education authority and (ii) outer London boroughs in each of the last five years; what information he has as to such payments to be made in the coming year; and if he will make a statement.

    Authorities have submitted some details of their per capita allowances for 1985–86 and 1986–87 as part of Her Majesty's inspectorate's 1986 review of LEA provision for education. However, it is not possible to set out accurate comparable data for individual LEAs because each authority has its own type of scheme. Comparisons can be misleading because the allowances do not always cover the same area of expenditure or class of pupils and they are often combined with additional amounts for certain subjects or departments.

    Ilea (Abolition)

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science what representations he has received about the proposed abolition of the Inner London education authority; and if he will make a statement.

    We have received some 1,650 letters from hon. Members, organisations and individual members of the public about the proposals announced by my right hon. Friend on 4 February.

    Testing

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science how much the introduction of testing for seven, 11, 14 and 16-year-olds will cost; what is the estimated annual cost; and if he will make a statement.

    The costs will depend on the nature of the tests and assessment arrangements required for various national curriculum subjects. My right hon. Friend will be reaching decisions on these matters, in the light of advice from subject working groups and the task group on assessment and testing. Overall, the Government expect the implementation of the national curriculum and assessment to be contained within its planned level of provision for education, where necessary by redeploying and using resources more effectively.

    School Meals

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science what are the results of the October 1987 census of school meals; arid what are the comparable figures for the previous census.

    Maintained Schools (Including Nursery and Special): England

    October 1987

    October 1986

    Number

    Per cent.

    Number

    Per cent.

    Pupils in attendance6,210,64010006,351,870100·0
    Pupils taking meals on payment1,989,74632·01,956,31030·8
    Free1,101,13217·71,143,81718·0
    Total3,090,87849·83,100,12748·8
    Pupils bringing own food2,008,17232·31,937,15130·5
    Pupils having other arrangements1,111,59017·91,314,59220·7

    An analysis of the returns shows the following proportions for primary and secondary pupils, as percentages of pupils in attendance:

    Primary

    Secondary

    1987

    1986

    1987

    1986

    Pupils taking school meals51·951·846·244·5
    Pupils bring own food39·437·324·423·3
    Pupils having other arrangements8·711·029·432·1

    Detailed tabulations on the returns from local education authorities in England, from which these national totals were derived, are being placed in the Library.

    House Of Commons

    Official And Library Corridors

    To ask the Lord President of the Council under what circumstances access to the Official Corridor and the Library Corridor is permitted to anyone other than right hon. and hon. Members.

    Use of guillotine since 1979
    Bills guillotined in standing committeeBills guillotined in committee of whole House
    Session/BillHours for 2nd ReadingHours in committee before guillotineHours in committee after guillotineHours in committee before guillotineHours in committee after guillotineTime allotted for report and 3rd ReadingNumber of hours allotted for Lords Amendments1
    1979–80
    Education (No. 2)782212 days until midnight4 hours
    Social Security660322 days until midnight3 hours
    Housing6110342 days until midnight1 day until midnight
    Social Security (No. 2)644201 day until midnight
    1980–81
    Transport755411 day until 1 am1 day until 10 pm
    British Nationality890463 days until midnight1 day until 10 pm
    1981–82
    Oil and Gas (Enterprise)670291 day until midnight and 1/2 day until 7 pm1 day until 10 pm
    Employment791191 day until midnight1 day until 10 pm
    Northern Ireland754101 day until midnight
    1982–83

    Guillotined Measures

    To ask the Lord President of the Council whether he will list the Bills guillotined since 1979; at what stage each Bill was guillotined; for how many hours such Bills had been debated (a) on Second Reading and (b) in Committee; and how many hours were subsequently allowed for each of the remaining stages.

    Bills guillotined in standing committee

    Bills guillotined in committee of whole House

    Session/Bill

    Hours for 2nd Reading

    Hours in committee before guillotine

    Hours in committee after guillotine

    Hours in committee before guillotine

    Hours in committee after guillotine

    Time allotted for report and 3rd Reading

    Number of hours allotted for Lords Amendments1

    Transport680161 day until
    Telecommunications6110391 day until midnight
    Housing and Building Control690181 day until 1 am
    1983–84
    Telecommunications680261 day until midnight
    Rates780291 day until midnight
    Rating and Valuation (Amendment) (Scotland)682181 day until midnight
    1984–85
    Local Government1586591 day until midnight and 1 day until 10 pm1 day until midnight
    Transport576531 day until midnight and 1 day until 10 pm1 day until 11 pm
    1985–86
    Gas775391 day until midnight and 1/2 day until 7pm2 hours
    Social Security5100411 day until midnight and 1 day until 10 pm4 hours
    European Communities (Amendment)31841 hour
    1986–87
    Abolition of Domestic Rates Etc (Scotland)6101181 day until midnight and 1 day until 10 pm3 hours
    Local Government Finance61561 day until midnight
    1987–88
    Education Reform788754 days until 10 pm
    Local Government Finance1272644 days2, last day until 10 pm
    Social Security376
    [Hours rounded to nearest whole.]

    1 Including debate on supplementary order.

    2 To be confirmed.

    3 Allocation of time moved on Lords Amendments.

    "The House Magazine"

    To ask the Lord President of the Council what forms of access to the precincts are given to employees of Parliamentary Communications Ltd. for the purposes of the operation of "The House Magazine"; if any advance information is given to the magazine by staff of the House; and if he will make a statement.

    Three representatives of "The House Magazine" have access to the Press Gallery. In addition, two research assistants have registered an interest in connection with that magazine, as required by the

    Resolution of the House of 17 December 1985. The only advance information provided to the magazine, m common with that provided generally to the Press Gallery, is on the future activities of Select and Standing Committees.

    To ask the Lord President of the Council when "The House Magazine" was granted permission by the House of Commons (Services) Committee to use the portcullis associated with the House as its insignia.

    I am advised that a record of the information requested cannot be traced.

    Overseas Development

    Non-Military Aid

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what was the change in the total value of Her Majesty's Government's overseas nonmilitary aid between 1979 and 1987 in real terms; and if he will make a statement.

    Figures for gross public expenditure on overseas aid for 1987 are not yet available. Between 1979 and 1986, expenditure in real terms fell by 16 per cent. In the period since 1982, however, it has been more than maintained and, as the recent public expenditure White Paper made clear, the aid programme is now planned to grow in real terms.

    Biwaters Project (Malaysia)

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs who carried out the independent check that established value for money in the Biwaters Malaysian project.

    The value-for-money check was carried out by consultants Coopers and Lybrand, in association with Sir William Halcrow and Partners.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs whether the Overseas Development Agency appraisal mission to Malaysia reviewed the performance of Biwater projects elsewhere, particularly in Nigeria; and if he will make a statement.

    The appraisal mission was concerned specifically with the project in Malaysia. In the light of its findings, and other investigations carried out, the Government were content both with the viability of the project and with the capability of Biwater to implement it. A review of other projects carried out by the same contractor is not normally practicable, particularly where the Overseas Development Agency is not involved in funding them.

    Aid Projects (Single Contractors)

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if the Governments of Cameroon, Chile and Thailand have insisted on negotiating a contract with a single contractor for United Kingdom aid projects; and if he will make a statement.

    No. Where assistance is sought from the aid and trade provision, the nature of contracts is primarily a matter for the contractual parties concerned in the light of the circumstances of each case.

    Ethiopia

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs whether he will make a further statement on aid by the United Kingdom to Ethiopia.

    British commitments for famine relief in Ethiopia, through bilateral and European Community channels, total over £45 million since the beginning of 1987. This includes the cost of 94,500 tonnes of bilateral food aid to help in meeting needs during 1988 and £3 million to support airlift operations by the office of the United Nations disaster relief co-ordinator. It also includes assistance with transport, port handling equipment, medicines and grain storage.The United Kingdom also maintains a technical cooperation and training programme for Ethiopia and is assisting with famine rehabilitation including a £1.2 million well rehabilitation project in Welo region.

    Khmer Rouge

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what steps he has taken to prevent aid provided by Her Majesty's Government for refugees at the Thai-Cambodia border from being diverted for use by the Khmer Rouge.

    Our assistance, which is provided through the relevant United Nations agencies, is subject to the stipulation that it should go only to the occupants of those camps controlled by the non-communist elements of the Cambodian resistance. We have received assurances that this stipulation is observed.

    Nicaragua

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs when the last technical assistance training award was made to Nicaragua; how many were made in the previous five years; and why they have ceased.

    The last technical co-operation training award was made to Nicaragua in 1982. We have no separate statistics of new awards made to Nicaragua in the five years previous to 1982. After 1982, we provided assistance to Nicaragua only for disaster relief or through voluntary agencies or international relief organisations; the European Community has provided substantial aid of which Britain's share is around 20 per cent.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if Her Majesty's Government will resume technical assistance training awards to Nicaragua; and if he will make a statement.

    National Finance

    Tax Revenue

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how much has been raised under the main heads of tax in 1986–87 and 1987–88.

    Following is the information :

    £ million
    1986–871987–88 latest estimate
    Income tax38,50041,400
    Corporation tax113,50015,600
    Petroleum revenue tax21,1902,330
    Capital gains tax1,0601,350
    Development land tax5525
    Inheritance tax9901,070
    Stamp duties1,8602,440

    1986–87

    1987–88 latest estimate

    Total inland revenue57,20064,200
    Value added tax21,40024,100
    Petrol, derv, etc.7,5007.800
    Cigarettes and other tabacco4,8004.800
    Spirits, beer, wine, cider and perry4,2004,400
    Betting and gaming780810
    Car tax9601,150
    Other excise duties2020
    EC own resources customs duties etc.1,3001,470
    agricultural levies250190
    Total customs and excise41,10044,700
    Vehicle excise duties32,5802.700
    Gas levy520500

    1 Includes net ACT.

    2 Includes advance petroleum revenue tax.

    3 Includes driving licence receipts.

    Special Advisers (Payments)

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what rules govern the receipt of payments by special advisers from former employers; and if he will make a statement.

    All special advisers, including those on secondment from outside employers, are subject to the provisions of the Civil Service Pay and Conditions of Service Code—except for the rules governing acceptance of outside appointments after resignation or retirement, and certain aspects of the rules on political activities.

    Ec Budget (United Kingdom Contribution)

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what was the total net contribution made by the United Kingdom to the European Economic Community in the financial year 1987–88; and by what amount this total had to be reviewed in light of the recent European Council agreement.

    Final information on the outturn of our net payments to European Community institutions in 1987–88 is not yet available. An estimate was contained in table 3.1 of the latest public expenditure White Paper. On the question of revisions to that estimate, I refer my hon. Friend to the information given by my right hon. Friend the Chief Secretary in the debate on the White Paper on 24 February, at columns 316–17.

    Inheritance Tax

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer (1) if he will list all those representations he has received to amend the exemption limit for inheritance tax on donations to political parties; and if he will place the submissions in the Library;(2) what was the basis on which he calculated that there will be no loss in revenue from his decision to amend the exemption limit for inheritance tax on donations to political parties;(3) how many estates in which donations were made to political parties in each year since 1979 have been subject to inheritance tax liability or capital transfer tax;

    (4) how much (a) inheritance tax or (b) capital transfer tax has been paid in each year since 1979 on donations to political parties.

    Information is not kept of the number of estates paying inheritance tax or capital transfer tax on gifts to political parties or of the amount of tax paid, but it is not thought that under present rules gifts of £100,000 or more are normally made, so the loss in revenue from abolishing the limit is likely to be negligible. No representations have been received to amend the exemption limit.

    Loans (Tax Relief)

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer under what circumstances any interest on loans qualifying for tax relief during a lifetime has obtained tax relief for any interest paid after death in any of the last five years; and if he will make a statement.

    Generally speaking, relief for interest paid ceases to be available when the borrower dies. However, in certain circumstances, interest on a loan to buy a borrower's main residence may continue to be eligible for relief where paid after the borrower's death by his personal representatives or the trustees of his will settlement, provided the home continues to be the main residence of the deceased's spouse or dependent relative. No figures are available of the claims made under this provision.

    Elderly Home Owners

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what information he has regarding the number of elderly home owners who have raised money by means of (a) home reversionary schemes, (b) mortgage annuity schemes and (c) building society maturity loans in each of the last five years; and what total sums are involved in each case.

    The information requested is not readily available in the form requested.

    Privatisation

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will list, for each privatisation measure since 1983, the Government's merchant bank advisers, brokers and reporting accountants, and details of any advertising agency involved; and if he will state whether any form of competitive tendering was undertaken in each case for each service.

    The Government's merchant bank advisers and brokers in each of the privatisation sales since 1983 are as follows. Reporting accountants and advertising agencies employed in the sales were usually joint appointments with the company, and are also listed. In addition, a number of sales of subsidiaries were carried out by nationalised industries. Details of the advisers for these sales are not held centrally.In each of the privatisation sales, except for British Airways, the appointment of merchant bank advisers, brokers and advertising agencies was subject to competition. In the case of British Airways, Hill Samuel (the merchant bank advisers) had advised when privatisation was first considered in 1980 and were retained for the sale because of their knowledge of the company—a competitive rate having been negotiated.

    The appointment of reporting accountants was subject to competition in the case of Enterprise Oil, British Telecom and the Plant Breeding Institute/National Seed Development Organisation. In the other privatisation sales the companies' auditors were appointed without

    Company

    Date of Sale

    Government Merchant bank Adviser

    Government Brokers

    Reporting Accountant

    Advertising Agency

    (Joint appointment unless otherwise stated)

    Associated British Ports1983J. Henry Schroder WaggW. Greenwell & Co.Price Waterhouse
    Enterprise Oil1984Kleinwort BensonCazenove De Zoete and BevanPeat, Marwick, Mitchell
    British Telecom1984Kleinwort BensonHoare Govett De Zoete and BevanCoopers and LybrandDorlands
    British Gas1986N. M. RothschildCazenove Wood MacKenzie James CapelPrice WaterhouseYoung & Rubicam1
    British Airways1987Hill SamuelCazenove Wood MacKenzieErnst and WhinneyAllen Brady & Marsh2
    Royal Ordnance1987N. M. RothschildHoare GovettCoopers and Lybrand
    Rolls Royce1987Samuel MontaguJames CapelCoopers and LybrandCollett, Dickinson Pearce3
    BAA1987County Nat WestCazenove County Nat WestTouche RossJ. Walter Thompson
    Plant Breeding Institute/ National Seed Development Organisation1987LazardsTouche Ross

    1 Dewe Rogerson were also employed for the advertising of the collection of the second instalment.2

    2 Government only. The company employed its own agency.

    3 Binns Vereka were also employed for the advertising of the collection of the second instalment.

    Age Allowances

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will estimate the number of retirement pensioners (a) aged 65 to 79 years and (b) aged 80 years or over who will be better off by (i) £1 per week, (ii) £1 to £2 per week, (iii) £2 to £3 per week, (iv) £3 to £4 per week, (v) £4 to £5 per week, and (vi) £5 per week or over as a consequence of the increase in the age allowances to £3,180 and £3,310 for a single person and £5,035 and £5,205 for a married couple.

    Gain1per week
    Number of tax units2who gain as a result of the increase in personal allowances (thousands)
    Number of tax units2 who gain from the Budget proposals for income tax rates and allowances (thousands)
    Aged 65–79Aged 80 +Aged 65–79Aged 80 +
    up to £12306511530
    £l-£21,510290515120
    £2-£32351556085
    £3-£4801523035
    £4-£575513020
    Over £510Nil60080
    TOTAL2,1204002,120400
    1 Compared with 1987–88 tax regime.
    2 Married couples counted as one unit.

    Computer Services

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if the computer services of (a) the Department of Health and Social Security, (b) the Inland Revenue, (c) the Home Department or (d) Her Majesty's Customs and Excise are to be contracted out.

    obtaining alternative tenders, to take advantage of their knowledge of the companies where this was expected to give rise to worthwhile savings in terms of time and costs. In each case a competitive rate was negotiated.

    Estimates are given in the table. The first two columns analyse tax units by the gains in 1988–89 due to the proposed increases in the age allowances and, where appropriate, the main personal allowances. The final two columns analyse tax units by the gains in 1988–89 due to all the reductions in rates of tax and increases in allowances proposed in the Budget. Estimates are based on a projection of the 1985–86 Survey of Personal Income and are provisional.

    Her Majesty's Customs and Excise announced recently that the Department's proposed new entry processing system (CHIEF) would, subject to satisfactory contractual negotiations, be developed and operated by British Telecom Applied Technology. This company already runs the existing departmental entry processing system (DEPS).Apart from this, and the use of IT consultancy services for specific functions, the Department has no present plans to contract out its computer services.The Inland Revenue has for several years made extensive use of the private sector in supporting its computer services and will continue to do so, but there are no plans to contract out any computer services functions.Responsibility for computer services in the Department of Health and Social Security is a matter for my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Social Services and in the Home Office the responsibility of my right hon. Friend the Home Secretary.

    Higher And Senior Executives

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will make it his policy to ensure that higher executive officers and senior executive grades will receive a pay award in 1988 sufficient to meet the increased cost of living in London and elsewhere; and if he will make a statement.

    The Treasury has discussed the 1988 pay claim for the executive grades with the National Union of Civil and Public Servants. An offer of a 4 per cent. increase was made to the NUCPS on 29 March. In response to the claim from the Council of Civil Service Unions the Treasury on 29 March offered an increase of 10 per cent. in London weighting rates. These offers take into account the need to recruit, retain and motivate staff within what can be afforded. Both offers are with effect from 1 April.

    Taxation Changes (Purchasing Impact)

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what assessment he has made of the net purchasing impact of taxation changes in his Budget on the regional economies of (a) the south-east, (b) the north-west.

    My right hon. Friend's Budget will provide a stimulus to enterprise and initiative in all regions of the country.

    Ec Finance Ministers

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer when he next expects to meet his counterparts from other European Community states; and what matters he intends to raise.

    The next meeting of the European Community's Council of Economic and Finance ministers is expected to be held on 18 April. The agenda for the meeting is likely to include the liberalisation of capital movements, a presentation by the Economic Policy Committee on the Commission's indirect tax approximation proposals, and the implementation of the Brussels European Council conclusions on budget discipline.

    Business Expansion Scheme

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will clarify the proposed rules for companies which will carry on qualifying activities for relief under the business expansion scheme, through the letting of homes on assured tenancies; and whether he intends that the company will be able to give notice to tenants at the end of the five-year qualifying period for relief under the business expansion scheme.

    The proposed rules for this relief will be set out in the Finance Bill. The tenant under an assured tenancy which qualifies for the purposes of the business expansion scheme will have security of tenure (subject to the right of the landlord to recover possession of his property on certain specified grounds set out in the Housing Bill and the Housing (Scotland) Bill).

    Drugs (Illegal Imports)

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what proportion of estimated illegal imports of drugs are now seized by Customs and Excise or intercepted prior to distribution, by category of drug for each of the last five years for which information is available.

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what proportions of seizures of illegally imported drugs, by category of drug, come from EEC countries and from each of the other major source countries for each of the last five years for which information is available.

    I regret that this information could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

    Income Tax (Higher Rates)

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how much in tax concessions has been received by those on tax rates above 40 per cent. since June 1979 at constant prices to the latest available date; what estimates are available of the amount that has gone to each region and of the regional numbers of taxpayers in the tax bands above 40 per cent.; and if he will make a statement.

    [holding answer 21 March 1988]: Income tax due from the top 2½ per cent. of taxpayers in 1978–79, the group liable at rates above 40 per cent., amounted to £3·4 billion, equivalent in real terms in 1988–89 to some £7·1 billion. In 1988–89, the tax due from the top 2½ per cent. of taxpayers will be about £9·0 billion — an increase of £2 billion, despite the reductions in tax rates and real increases in allowances since 1978–79. If the taxable incomes of the top 2½per cent. of taxpayers in 1988–89 were as they are now forecast to be, and at the same time were subject to 1978–79 income tax rates and allowances indexed to 1988-S9 levels by reference to the statutory formula, their liability would increase by £6 billion. However, the assumption on which this estimate is based is inherently implausible.I regret that corresponding information for each region is not available. Estimates of the number of taxpayers paying tax at the 45 per cent. rate or above in 1985–86, the latest year for which regional information is available, are given in the table.

    Number of taxpayers1 in 1985–86 paying tax at the 45 per cent, rate or above
    Region'000
    Northern17
    Yorkshire and Humberside29

    Region

    '000

    North West39
    East Midlands25
    West Midlands38
    East Anglia21
    South East291
    South West37
    Wales15
    Scotland40
    Northern Ireland11
    United Kingdom2570

    1 Married couples counted as one unit.

    2 Includes members of the forces and Merchant Navy and a small number of civil servants serving abroad who have not been allocated to regions.

    Department

    Cost of London weighting 1£ million

    Number of staff receiving London weighting

    Proportion of staff in department receiving London weighting per cent.

    Non-industrials2

    Agriculture, Fisheries and Food3·722,94030
    Cabinet Office1·781,16071
    Central Office of Information1·0670087
    Charity Commission0·3221064
    Crown Estate Office0·064075
    Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal0·0000
    Crown Prosecution Service33·352,52072
    Customs and Excise7·696,41025
    Defence20·1616,54018
    Education and Science2·011,35055
    Employment Group12·1510,16017
    Energy1·2683081
    Environment/Transport/PSA15·2712,16034
    Export Credits Guarantee Department1·1176042
    General Register Officer (Scotland)0·0000
    Government Actuary0·085092
    Health and Social Security20·0617,01018
    Home Office12·289,73028
    Inland Revenue15·2112,94019
    Intervention Board for Agricultural Produce0·0000
    Land Registry1·091,23017
    Law Officer's Department0·032094
    Lord Advocate's Department0·032089
    Lord Chancellor's Department5·303,94038
    National Investment and Loan Office0·0850100
    National Savings0·241602
    Northern Ireland Office0·1611065
    Office of Arts and Libraries0·086098
    Office of Fair Trading0·4331098
    Office of Gas Supply0·0220100
    Office of Population Census and Surveys1·1173035
    Ordnance Survey0·121405
    Overseas Development Administration1·4095064
    Paymaster General0·0000
    Privy Council0·053097
    Public Record Office0·4340098
    Registers of Scotland0·0000
    Registry of Friendly Societies0·1711099
    Royal Mint0·02104
    Scottish Courts Administration0·0000
    Scottish Courts Service0·0000
    Scottish Office0·03200
    Scottish Records Office0·0000
    Stationery Office0·5436018
    Trade and Industry10·767,77064
    Treasury2·762,07080
    Treasury Solicitor's Department0·6241095
    Welsh Office0·07402

    London Weighting Allowance

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer (1) what was the total value of that part of salaries paid as London weighting of the employees of each Government Department during the last year for which full figures are available; and what proportion of the total value of salaries paid by each Department of London employees the London weighting payments account for;(2) how many and what proportion of the employees of each Government Department receive London weighting payments.

    [holding answers 25 March 1988]: The information is as follows, for non-industrial and industrial staff separately. There is no central record of the total salaries paid by each Department to London employees and this could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

    Department

    Cost of London weighting 1£ million

    Number of staff receiving London weighting

    Proportion of staff in department receiving London weighting per cent.

    Industrials

    4

    Agriculture, Fisheries and Food0·058014
    Defence2·863,4205
    Employment Group0·056010
    Environment/Transport/PSA3·733,07029
    Health and Social Security0·033013
    Home Office0·222107
    Stationery Office0·9466048
    Trade and Industry0·0812036
    Treasury0·2318023
    Others0·05402

    1 Estimated cost in 1987–88 financial year.

    2 As at 1 April 1987 (Source: Mandate).

    3 The numbers for the Crown Prosecution Service are an estimate.

    4 As at 1 January 1987 (Source: Departmental returns).

    Pensions

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what representations he has received seeking changes to reduce the effective 41·6 per cent. rate of tax for pensioners in receipt of age allowance.

    [holding answer 25 March 1988]: There have been a number of representations on this subject.The situation to which my hon. Friend refers affects fewer than 2 per cent. of pensioner households, and has nothing whatever to do with the Budget changes. The age allowance has always been withdrawn progressively for taxpayers with incomes above a certain limit. This income limit is at its highest ever level in real terms, and the effective rate within the withdrawal band, at 41·6 per cent., is in fact at its lowest ever level. Those few taxpayers who have incomes within the withdrawal band will gain an extra £2·50 per week from the increase of £800 in the income limit proposed in the Budget, on top of the benefit they receive from the double indexation of the personal allowances and the basic rate cut.

    Consultancy Contracts

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will list each management or computer consultancy contract awarded by Her Majesty's Customs and Excise in 1987, giving in each case the name of the consultancy firm and the subject of the assignment.

    Firm and assignment

    Arthur Andersen—Design of VAT work planning systems BIS Systems—Review of planning and control procedure for Customs Handling Import and Export Freight (CHIEF); advice on data cabling of HQ offices (2 contracts)
    British Telecom—Technical study of new electronic tariff Calidus Systems — Advice on data administration for CHIEF
    Comshare — Development of management information systems
    Datafit—Development of various computer programmings
    Ernst Whinney—Development of management information systems; review of part of IT strategy
    Expert Systems International—Advice on expert systems Honeywell—Study of extension to computerised intelligence system
    Hoskyns—Support to CHIEF system (2 contracts)
    Hunterskil South—Computerisation of registry
    ICL—Support to CHIEF system (4 contracts)
    Inforem—Business Systems Analysis methodology
    Keith London Associates—Testing of VAT management information system
    LBMS—Software design study
    Logica—Review of Departmental Entry Processing System requirements; advice on Structural Systems and Design Methodology
    Mindworks — Development of management information systems (2 contracts)
    National Computing system—Advice on computerisation of personnel records
    PActel — Production of project control guidelines for CHIEF
    Peat Marwick McLintock — Development of Mainframe links with micro-computers; activity costing and decision support programmes
    Regional Computer Systems—Computerisation of personnel records
    Soft Option—Computerisation of personnel records
    Systems Concepts—Computerisation of personnel records; development of management information system
    System Designers—Development of management information systems
    Timeslice — Development of accounting system for Solicitor's Office
    Yale Data Management—Establishment of CHIEF System Test Branch

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will list each management or computer consultancy contract awarded by the Inland Revenue in 1987 giving in each case the name of the consultancy firm and the subject of the assignment.

    [holding answer 30 March 1988]: The Inland Revenue awarded the following consultancy contracts in 1987:

    • Touche Ross—Contingency Planning
    • Cullinet—Data Management and Database Design
    • Oracle UK Ltd.—Database Products
    • Park Avenue Productions PLC—Communications
    • Celtechnology—Organisation, Management
    • J. Pincus—Specialist Management Training
    • Peat Marwick McClintock—Financial Systems

    Job Dispersal

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what is the outcome of the programme for dispersing Government work out of London and the south-east announced in 1979; and whether the Government intend further initiatives on the location of Civil Service work.

    In 1979 we announced a programme designed to disperse 5,900 posts, mainly to Scotland and the north. Over 5,500 posts have been dispersed under this programme, and planning is in hand for the remainder. Over the same period, and on their own initiative, Departments have relocated well over 6,000 other posts out of London and the south-east. About four fifths of the Civil Service is now located outside Greater London.No further central targets for relocation are being set, but Departments will be reviewing their location of work with a view in suitable cases to finding locations offering advantages in terms of recruitment and retention of staff, value for money and other considerations relevant to service delivery and management. In their reviews, Departments will consider localities which offer such advantages, including where appropriate areas which are the focus of the Government's regional and urban policies. A copy of the guidelines issued to Departments for these reviews has been placed in the Library of the House.

    Exchange Rate

    To ask the Chancellor of Exchequer if he will estimate the effect of unsterilised exchange rate intervention on the growth of monetary aggregates over the last 12 months; and if he will estimate any consequent effect on the retail prices index.

    The impact of intervention on MO is offset automatically by the Bank of England's daily money market operations. There is no simple relation between the intervention and broad monetary growth. The Government's policy is to fund all intervention, that is, to sterilise it. The published provisional figures for February 1988 indicate that all intervention and other borrowing has been fully funded in the 12 months to that date.

    Overseas Investments

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what was the amount of earnings from overseas investments in 1987–l88; what proportion this constitutes of the national income; and what are the comparable figures for the preceding five years.

    The figures are shown in the table.

    YearNet earnings1on overseas assets £ millionPer cent. of GDP
    1982–832,0560·7
    1983–842,6780·9
    1984–854,4931·4
    1985–862,9050·8
    1986–875,6291·4
    1987–8824,1961·3
    1In respect of United Kingdom investments overseas less overseas investments in the United Kingdom.
    2 First three quarters only available.

    Interest And Exchange Rates

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will make a statement on the connection between interest rates and the exchange rates.

    I refer the hon. Member to paragraph 2.11 of the 1988–89 "Financial Statement and Budget Report".

    Income Tax

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what is his estimate of the weekly gain of a single person earning £150,000 a year from his Budget tax changes.

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what is his estimate of the weekly gain of a single person earning £100,000 a year from his Budget tax changes.

    [pursuant to his reply, 30 March 1988]: I regret the figures given were incorrect. The answer should have been as follows:

    "The weekly gain from the Budget of a single person earning £100,000 and £150,000 a year, with no other income, would be £271·92 and £463·23 respectively. The figures refer only to income tax and assume that the taxpayer is entitled to no income tax reliefs or allowances other than the single person's allowance. The calculation is made by comparing the taxpayer's income tax liability under the 1987–88 tax regime with that under the proposed regime for 1988–89."

    Transport

    Aviation Safety

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what studies of aviation safety have been made by his Department in the last year; and if he will make a statement.

    The Department's air accidents investigation branch is responsible for investigating aircraft accidents and their reports are published. The following accident reports have been published during the last 12 months.

    • No. 1/87 Bell 212 G-BJJR in the North Sea. Issued on 28 April 1987.
    • No. 2/87 Lockheed Tristar G-BBAI at Leeds. Issued on 25 September 1987.
    • No. 3/87 Turbo Commander EL-BGL at Eastbourne. Issued on 29 July 1987.
    • No. 4/87 DHC-6 Twin Otter G-BGPC at Laphroaig. Issued on 10 December 1987.
    • No. 5/87 Chinook G-BISO in the North Sea. Issued on 20 January 1988.
    • No. 6/87 Short SD3 EI-BEM at East Midlands. Issued on 20 January 1988.
    • No. 7/87 Twin Squirrel G-BKIH at Swalcliffe. Issued on 29 February 1988.
    • No. 8/87 Boeing 747 G-AWNB at Heathrow. Issued on 29 February 1988.
    • No. 9/87 Bell 214ST G-BKFN in the North Sea. Issued on 28 March 1988.
    • No. 1/88 DH 89A Dragon-Rapide G-AGTM at Duxford. Issued on 28 March 1988.
    Otherwise, the regulation of air safety is the responsibility of the Civil Aviation Authority.

    British Rail (Electrification)

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what Government subsidies have been made available to British Rail in each year since 1979 towards its electrification programme.

    The Government do not give BR specific investment grants. The public service obligation grant includes provision for the appropriate share of revenue investment and depreciation on capital assets used in the grant-aided railway. A significant proportion of electrification expenditure has, therefore, been eligible for grant. No grant will however be available for inter-city services from 1 April this year: their investment will be expected to show a commercial rate of return.

    Road Bridges

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many road bridges currently in use were constructed before the introduction of national design standards in 1922; and how many of these are recognised as requiring replacement or strengthening to answer the needs of modern vehicle weights.

    The bridge census and sample survey report, which was published in March 1987, shows that there are about 25,000 bridges on local roads in England built before 1922. There are also about 900 pre-1922 bridges on trunk roads in England. The sample survey indicates that about a quarter of these bridges may require to be strengthened to meet the requirements of the new bridge assessment code BD 21/84. In November the Government announced a programme for the rehabilitation of bridges on motorways and all-purpose trunk roads including the assessment and strengthening of the older bridges. Discussions are taking place with the owners of bridges off the national road system about a similar programme for their bridges.

    Intercity

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what are the latest available figures for the proportion of British Rail InterCity trains that arrive on time; and to what extent these figures differ from the figures published by British Rail according to its definition of on time.

    We have agreed with BR its objective that 90 per cent. of InterCity trains should arrive within 10 minutes of the timetabled time. I understand that in the four weeks to 27 February, the latest period for which figures are available, 86 per cent. of InterCity trains arrived within 10 minutes of right time. My Department does not monitor figures for arrival at timetabled times.

    M25

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether he will make a further statement about improvements planned for the M25.

    The motorway is being widened to four lanes between junctions 11 and 13. Consultants are investigating ways of widening the length between junctions 15 and 16. No other major improvements are planned between completion of the review of the motorway as a whole. Details of the review will be announced soon.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what progress there has been in establishing responsibility for the problems in construction of the M25 between Leatherhead and Reigate.

    Under the conditions of contract it is for the engineer to decide where responsibility rests. He has determined that responsibility rests partly with the Department and partly with the contractor. The Department is considering its position. I shall make a statement as soon as possible.

    A51 (Clotton)

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will introduce a speed limit for Clotton on the A51.

    No. Conditions on this part of the A5I still do not meet the nationally applied criteria for a speed limit.

    A6 (Disley-High Lane Bypass)

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport why the special landscape areas of (a) Cheshire and Derbyshire were, and (b) Stockport and the Etherow-Goyt River Valley Park were not, included in his published map of the proposed A6 Disley-High Lane bypass; and if he will make a statement.

    The special landscape areas of Cheshire and Derbyshire were shown diagramatically in the consultation brochure because they formed part of those councils' planning policie. Although the Greater Manchester structure plan designated an area that falls within Stockport MBC's boundary as land of special landscape policy it was only on 12 January, six days before the public consultation bagan, that the areas were included in the Stockport borough local plan after committee approval. We shall take account of the special designation in our further consideration of options for a High Lane-Disley bypass.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport on what date he saw a delegation from the High Peak borough council in connection with the proposed A6 Disley-High Lane bypass; what was discussed at the meeting; and if he will make a statement.

    I met a delegation from High Peak borough council on 21 March. The delegation explained its concern about the effects of the "Brown Route" and sought more information on the alternatives.It was agreed that officials from the Department would meet council members and officials to explain the bypass alternatives in more detail. I confirmed that the council's views together with many others we have received would be fully considered in reaching decisions on whether to add a scheme to the national trunk road programme and on choice of route.

    Inner Cities

    Mr. Gould