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Low Flying

Volume 131: debated on Friday 15 April 1988

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To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what proportion of complaints received about low flying in 1987 were identified as relating to (a) fast jets, (b) light jet trainers, (c) heavy propeller-driven aircraft, (d) light propeller-driven aircraft and helicopters.

[holding answer 22 February 1988]: The proportion of complaints and inquiries about low flying received in 1987 identified as relating to fast jets, light jet trainers, heavy propeller-driven aircraft and light propeller-driven aircraft and helicopters is, respectively, 71·4 per cent., 0·1 per cent., 2·1 per cent. and 2·7 per cent. In the remaining 23·7 per cent. of cases the type of aircraft involved is not known.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what proportion of complaints received about low flying in 1987 were identified as relating to (a) British military aircraft, (b) United States air force aircraft and (c) other military aircraft.

[holding answer 22 February 1988]: The nationality of the aircraft involved is rarely mentioned in complaints, and the majority of complaint records do not include this information. Where it is available, in 5·71 per cent. of all cases, the percentages of the total relating to British military aircraft, United States air forces aircraft and other military aircraft are 4·51 per cent., 1·18 per cent. and 0·02 per cent. respectively.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many low flying sorties were carried out over (a) England, (b) Wales, (c) Scotland and (d) Northern Ireland during 1987.

[holding answer 22 February 1988]: Fixed-wing low-flying training is not currently undertaken in Northern Ireland. Otherwise, a typical low-level sortie covers some 300–500 miles and commonly covers more than one of the areas mentioned. The information requested is not available.