Skip to main content

Electricity Privatisation

Volume 164: debated on Monday 18 December 1989

The text on this page has been created from Hansard archive content, it may contain typographical errors.

20.

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy if he will make a statement on progress towards his announced timetable for the privatisation of the electricity industry.

42.

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy if he will make a statement on the progress of plans for the electricity privatisation share issue and related matters.

The Government remain on target to complete the privatisation of the industry within this Parliament.

75.

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy what provisions he has made to ensure a level playing field between fossil fuel industries, including coal, and nuclear fuel supplies to electricity generation subsequent to vesting day.

Coal will continue to be the major fuel for electricity generation for many years to come. The non-fossil fuel obligation will ensure that nuclear power continues to play a strategic role in ensuring security of supply and that renewable sources of energy will be able to fulfil their potential as soon as practicable.

68.

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy what is his latest estimate of the total cumulative cost to his departmental public expenditure so far of consultancy, advertising and advice relating to privatisation of the electricity supply industry

The total cumulative cost to my Department (as at 30 November this year) is £12·4 million.

46.

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy what provisions he has made to ensure a proper valuation of the electricity supply industry's land and property assets before vesting day.

Valuers have been appointed to value the land and property of each of the electricity supply industry bodies.

31.

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy if he will make a further statement on the likely cost implications for major industrial users of the privatisation of electricity.

Major industrial users will be able to negotiate with the supplier or generator of their choice. The introduction of competition should enable such customers to obtain competitive contracts. There will thus be a downward pressure on costs and prices.