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Written Answers

Volume 164: debated on Monday 8 January 1990

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Written Answers To Questions

Monday 8 January 1990

Attorney-General

Taken-Over Cases

26.

To ask the Attorney-General if he will list those cases taken over by the Director of Public Prosecutions since 1987.

Statistics concerning private prosecutions are not collected. The CPS has identified 28 private prosecutions conducted by private individuals or bodies which have been taken over by the Crown prosecution service since 1987. I will write to the hon. Gentleman listing the cases.

John Black Rn

To ask the Attorney-General whether he is now in a position to give a date when the High Court will hear his application for a fresh inquest into the death of the late Petty Officer John Black, RN, in Sabinillas, Spain, in December 1983.

No. The case is in the Crown list, but no hearing date has yet been fixed by the court.

Courts And Legal Services Bill Lords

To ask the Attorney-General what is the estimated cost of implementing the Courts and Legal Services Bill [Lords].

I refer the hon. Member to the reply given to him on 7 December 1989 at column 316, and to the explanatory and financial memorandum prefacing the Bill.

Transport

Cyclists

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will direct British Rail to consider ways in which cyclists can more easily use rail services.

British Rail has regular contact with the cycling organisations and is aware of their needs. I understand that BR's policy is to welcome cyclists and to convey bicycles whenever possible, for an appropriate charge, provided that this will not unduly inconvenience other passengers, or displace other revenue-earning traffic such as parcels.

Motoring Organisations

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport which motoring organisations he or his predecessor met over the last year; and on which dates.

During 1989 Transport Ministers met representatives of motoring organisations as follows:

The Automobile Association:

  • 24 January
  • 14 June
  • 20 June
  • 19 July
  • 31 October
  • 29 November

The Federation of British Historic Vehicle Clubs:

  • 6 September

The Institute of Advanced Motorists:

  • 14 December

The Royal Automobile Club:

  • 26 June
  • 6 September
  • 7 November

Prestwick Airport

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many flights have been diverted to Prestwick since 1 November.

The Civil Aviation Authority has not yet published figures for this period. Preliminary information from Prestwick Airport Limited indicates that, from 1 November to 31 December 1989, the airport handled 144 air transport movements diverted from other airports.

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport which building surveyors, land agents or chartered surveyors were used by his Department or by the British Airports Authority, or by his or their advisers, to value land at Prestwick airport, including land not required for airport operations, when assessing the assets of the British Airports Authority for privatisation.

Page 58 of the prospectus offering shares in BAA for sale records that Debenham Tewson and Chinnocks Limited, international property advisers, valued the land at the BAA airports.

Channel Tunnel

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will make a statement following the Anglo-French intergovernmental commission announcement that passengers will not leave their cars and coaches when travelling through the Channel tunnel with particular regard to safety aspects in the tunnel.

No. The intergovernmental commission was established by the Channel fixed link treaty to supervise, in the name and on behalf of the two Governments, all matters concerning the construction and operation of the fixed link. On safety matters, it is advised by the independent binational safety authority, also established by the treaty. Parliament has accepted that the safety authority is the right body to oversee tunnel safety standards. I believe that the safety authority will shortly be publishing a report which sets out the information on which its unanimous recommendation to the commission is based.

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what is the make-up and terms of reference for his Department's working group on the assessment of the impact of railway noise with regard to the Channel tunnel link.

The aim will be to establish for new railway lines a noise standard at a level which equitably relates to the standard set by regulation for new highways. I hope to make an announcement shortly about the establishment of a departmental committee to carry out this task.

Lrt (Safety)

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether he is yet in a position to announce safety and quality of service objectives for London Regional Transport.

[pursuant to his reply, 20 December 1989, c. 280]: Following is a fuller text of my letter to the chairman of London Regional Transport.

"My predecessor wrote to you on your appointment about the challenges facing London Regional Transport. He asked you to prepare a strategy for the coming years, which could be used as a basis for setting formal objectives for you and your Board.
Your response takes the form of the "Chairman's Planning Statement," which you are about to publish. In the light of that statement, I am writing to you about the safety and quality of service objectives I wish you to pursue. Before 1 April 1990 I shall settle with you the financial objectives for LRT covering the next three financial years.

Safety

LRT and its subsidiaries are responsible for the safe operation of the services they provide. The Fennell Report on the King's Cross fire underlined the need to give the highest priority to safety and to address safety matters explicitly in all LRT's activities. You have undertaken with vigour the task of implementing the Fennell Report's recommendations. You have already fully implemented 73 of the 127 recommendations addressed to LRT or London Underground, and have in hand action on the remaining 54.
You have also now established a clear framework for collecting statistics on safety performance, setting safety objectives and monitoring and auditing safety performance at every level of the organisation. This should ensure the progressive improvement in the safety of all the services you provide or secure. I welcome the steps you have taken. I hereby endorse the safety objectives set out in Annex A to this letter.

Quality of Service on the Underground

Demand for Underground services has grown by more than 70 per cent. since 1982. This has put the Underground under strain and we are all agreed that the quality of service for passengers is not as good as it should be.
Much of passengers' dissatisfaction stems from overcrowding. The only way to deal adequately with the growth in demand is to invest in increasing the capacity of the system. This is why approval has been given for a massive investment programme, including the £900 million Major Upgrading Programme and the extension of the Jubilee Line to service East London and Docklands. Urgent work is in progress on the options for another major new line to relieve congestion. In the shorter term, we must ensure that the most is made of the existing system. I am therefore setting objectives for improvement in such areas as peak capacity, reliability and the availability of lifts and escalators. I shall look to London Underground to meet these as soon as possible and, in any case, no later than 31 March 1992. These objectives are set out in full at Annex B to the Letter.

Docklands Light Railway

The Docklands Light Railway has been in operation for just over two years. It is now being extended to the City and to Beckton. Measures are in hand to increase its capacity still further. It is vital that the DLR provides a reliable and high-quality service, as the system is upgraded and capacity increased. I am therefore setting targets for the DLR covering aspects of service similar to those in the objectives set for the Underground. These are set out in Annex C. Again, the targets should be met as soon as possible, and no later than 31 March 1992.

LRT Bus Services

Despite increasing difficulties with traffic congestion, there has been a noticeable improvement in the percentage of scheduled bus mileage actually operated, and average waiting time has been stabilised over the past couple of years. You have increased the number of routes let by competitive tender. You have also restructured London Buses Ltd. into smaller, more accountable, subsidiaries. These measures have played a valuable part in securing better quality and value for money. I now think that the time has come to build on that success by setting LRT quality of service targets for all its bus services, including those operated by London Buses and other operators on contract. The objectives are set out in Annex D.

LRT Travel Enquiry Service

It is important that passengers should have ready access to up-to-date information on all LRT's passenger services. I am therefore setting LRT's Travel Enquiry Service the objective of ensuring that 75 per cent. of telephone callers receiving the ringing tone should be answered within 30 seconds and no more than 10 per cent. of callers should receive the engaged tone.
You will report to my Department and to the London Regional Passengers' Committee at quarterly intervals, the performance achieved against the quality of service objectives.
As you know, it is also my intention to set LRT, in good time before 1 April, financial objectives for the next three financial years. These will be designed to ensure that these safety and quality of service objectives are met as efficiently and economically as possible, so that customers and taxpayers, receive proper value for money. Our officials are already in touch about this."

Copies of the annexes to this letter have been placed in the House Libraries.

Home Department

Elected Executive

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what representations he has received in favour of electing an executive separately from Parliament.

Written Constitution

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what representations he has received on the subject of a written constitution.

The Government receive representations from time to time advocating a written constitution. These could be enumerated only at disproportionate cost.

Second Chamber

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what representations he has received seeking the establishment of a democratically elected second chamber.

The Government receive representations from time to time advocating abolition or reform of the House of Lords. They could be enumerated only at disproportionate cost.

Prisons (Transfers)

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many prisoners were awaiting transfer to Thorp Arch from Durham at the end of the months August through to November.

At the end of the four months for which information has been requested, the numbers of prisoners held at Her Majesty's prison Durham awaiting transfer to Her Majesty's prison Thorp Arch were as follows:

Number
August 198938
September 198943
October 198948
November 198954

Shamim Ayaz

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when Shamim Ayaz, Ref. H 162359; Imm/15031, is to be issued with a passport to join his father in the United Kingdom; when the post in Islamabad was instructed by him to issue a visa to Shamim Ayaz; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Shamim Ayaz's application for entry clearance to settle in the United Kingdom as the dependent son of Mr. Muzaffar Hussain has been referred by the entry clearance officer in Islamabad to the immigration department of the Home Office for consideration under paragraph 56 of the immigration rules and the concession announced by my right hon. Friend the Member for Witney (Mr. Hurd) on 14 June 1989 at column 463. The papers arrived on 1 December and a decision will be taken as soon as possible.

Political Refugees

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will specify the criteria under which political refugees are now admitted to the United Kingdom.

Applications for asylum on arrival at United Kingdom ports are considered under the criteria of the 1951 United Nations convention and 1967 protocol relating to the status of refugees. Article 1 of the convention defines a refugee as inter alia someone who

"owing to well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion, is outside the country of his nationality and is unable or, owing to such fear, is unwilling to avail himself of the protection of that country".
If the person has arrived from a safe third country he or she may be returned to that country to pursue an application there. A refugee who has already found protection in another country may be admitted to the United Kingdom if this is a more appropriate country of refuge.

Prisons (Capacity)

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what was the under or over-capacity of Thorp Arch and Durham prisons at the end of the months August to November.

Durham

Thorp

Certified Normal Accommodation Population3 on:

1729

2156

25 August1,002144
29 September1,006150
27 October976149
24 November1,019146

1 There was no change to the certified normal accommodation at Durham Prison during the period in question.

2 Available accommodation at Thorp Arch has effectively been reduced to 150 since August to allow for a rolling programme of refurbishment, involving the installation of integral sanitation.

3 The population details provided refer to the last Friday in each of the four months.

Brownhills And Heywood High Schools

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when he expects to reply to the application by Staffordshire county council for section 11 money in respect of Brownhills and Heywood high schools; and if he will make a statement.

Additional information submitted by the authority on 8 December is being considered. We hope to be in a position to take a decision on the application shortly.

Alcohol Consumption

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he has any proposals to change the law to promote and encourage non and low-alcohol consumption by young people.

We very much welcome the introduction, by my hon. Friend the Member for Honiton (Sir Peter Emery) of the Licensing (Low Alcohol Drinks) Bill, which seeks to amend the definition of intoxicating liquor in the Licensing Act 1964 and of alcoholic liquor in the Licensing (Scotland) Act 1976.

Robberies

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will supply statistics of robberies, and attempted robberies involving the confrontation of counter staff in the betting office, banking and building society industries over the past three years.

Information is not available in the form requested. The total numbers of notifiable offences of robbery are published annually, and most recently in table 2.10 of "Criminal Statistics, England and Wales, 1988" (Cm. 847). Information on the location of notifiable offences of robbery in which firearms were reported to have been used is given in table 3.8 of the same publication. A copy of this publication is available in the Library. Offences of attempted robbery are included in the robbery category and are not separately identified in the figures collected centrally.

Hong Kong

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many visitors there have been to the United Kingdom from Hong Kong, arriving in each of the last 36 months for which he has figures.

The latest available information is given in the table for British dependent territories citizens from Hong Kong. Reliable figures of admissions of stateless persons from Hong Kong are not available.

Hong Kong British Dependent Territory Citizens admitted to the United Kingdom as ordinary or business visitors, November 1986 to October 1989
Number of persons
Month19861987198811989
January1,8901,2801,510
February2,2303,3603,870
March1,5701,6502,280
April2,0102,0601,950
May2,6402,2802,600
June3,5603,3804,490
July5,3704,9905,440
August5,2804,5405,760
September3,2103,5203,960
October2,8502,8903,100
November1,2601,7601,610n.y.a.
December1,7501,9801,840n.y.a.
Annual total27,10034,40033,400n.y.a.
1 Provisional.
n.y.a. = Not yet available.

Downing Street Railings

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what are the expected savings to the Metropolitan police following the erection of railings in Downing street.

Ambulance Duties

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what has been the number of police man hours employed in ambulance duties per police authority, to date.

The readily available information is that up to 31 December police forces had provided approximately the number of man hours shown in the table in assisting the ambulance service in their areas.

Approximate number of man hours
Hours
Bedfordshire17,700
Derbyshire6,900
Dorset9,500
Hampshire5,100
Hertfordshire31,600
Lincolnshire2,600
South Yorkshire27,300
Staffordshire1,750
Surrey850
Warwickshire460
West Mercia6,100
West Midlands35,500
West Yorkshire20,700
I understand that in the Metropolitan police district about 460 officers are usually employed in each 24-hour period assisting the ambulance service.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is the cost per police man hour of deploying the police on ambulance duties (a) outside London and (b) in London.

The charge that is made by the Metropolitan police to the regional health authority for police officers who assist the London ambulance service is £16·20 per hour of normal duty time worked. Information about the charges made outside London is not available centrally; the level of charge is determined by the relevant police authority.

Visas (Indian Sub-Continent)

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people are waiting for interview in queues 1,2,3 and 4 at each British post on the Indian sub-continent, and if he will give comparable figures for 1988, 1987 and 1986.

[holding answer 18 December 1989]: The information requested is given in the table.

Estimated numbers of applicants in the Indian sub—continent awaiting their first interview for entry to the United Kingdom
Number of persons
Post1Category3
Queue 1Queue 2Queue 3Queue 4
Dhaka
End September
19866401,9001302,700
19874001,8001402,600
19882301,6001502,100
19891206501201,400
New Delhi4
End September
198670210460180
19874032060090
1988300400110
198926033090
Bombay
End September
1986120450480130
198756046040140
19883035048050
198942053090
Madras5
End September
198711016
1988
198920106
Islamabad
End September
19868806102,100740
19877909702,300850
19881,2001,6002,4001,000
19892502,3001,700940
Karachi
End September
198620601001
1987108019010
1988101802104
1989130201
Total Indian sub—continent
End September
19861,7003,2003,3003,800
19871,8003,6003,3003,600
19881,5004,1003,6003,300
19893703,6002,7002,500
1 5 or fewer
2 There were no applicants awaiting for interview in Calcutta.
3 Queue 1: Persons with a claim to the right of abode, dependent relatives over 70 years old, and special compassionate cases (first—time applicants for settlement).

Queue 2: Spouses, and children under 18 years old (first-time applicants for settlement).
Queue 3: Fiance(e)s, and other applicants (first-time applicants for settlement).
Queue 4: Re-applicants for settlement.

4 Data exclude persons seeking political asylum in the United Kingdom.

5Madras did not re-open for entry clearance work until October 1986.

6 Separate data are not available; re-applicants are included in the data for first-time applicants.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people have applied over the past year for visas to visit the United Kingdom from British posts on the Indian sub-continent; how many were (a) granted and (b) refused; and what was the average waiting time for (i) interview and (ii) secured interview.

[holding answer 18 December 1989]: In the 12 months ending 30 September 1989, 176,500 persons in the Indian sub-continent applied for a visa to visit the United Kingdom; during the same period 151,800 such applications were granted, including those granted on appeal, and 19,400 were refused initially. Visit applications were considered within 24 hours.Those applicants who then required a detailed interview were usually seen within the 24-hour period except in Madras and Islamabad where the waiting time for applicants interviewed at the end of October 1989 was two to three and eight days respectively. The average waiting time over the latest 12 months is not available centrally because of incomplete information.

Civil Defence

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what was the total amount of civil defence grant aid for (a) staff costs, (b) building work and (c) other costs in the financial years from 1983–84 to 1988–89 and projected for 1989–90, received by each London borough.

[holding answer 14 December 1989]: The information requested in respect of financial years 1985–86 onwards is shown in the table. Comparable figures for 1983–84 and 1984–85 could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Civil defence grant aid received by London boroughs 1985–86
BoroughStaff £Building £Other £
Barking and Dagenham1,8923,349
Barnet0—3,300
Bexley3,6922,765
Brent1,822
Bromley3,6944,838
Camden1,956
City of London12,321
Croydon2,014
Ealing1,061
Enfield57
Greenwich2861,718
Hackney1,530
Hammersmith and Fulham2,361
Haringey2,301
Harrow1,409
Havering1,562
Hillingdon5,651
Hounslow1,1581,461
Islington1,404
Kensington and Chelsea6802,218
Kingston2,337
Lambeth7,105

Borough

Staff £

Building £

Other £

Lewisham3,818
Merton2,50175,0002,442
Newham1,323
Redbridge6182,003
Richmond
Southwark5,092
Sutton3,433
Tower Hamlets1,2953,119
Waltham Forest10,0031,985
Wandsworth5,911
Westminster2,282

Civil Defence grant aid received by London boroughs 1986–87

Borough

Staff £

Building £

Other £

Barking and Dagenham2,0613,364
Barnet2,230
Bexley4,143
Brent1,894
Bromley3,4024,249
Camden2,393
City of London146,65614,453
Croydon2,076
Ealing224198
Enfield45
Greenwich1,737
Hackney1,900
Hammersmith and Fulham3,330
Haringey2,370
Harrow5,724
Havering1,530
Hillingdon5,565
Hounslow1,2181,351
Islington1,579
Kensington and Chelsea6482,405
Kingston2,675
Lambeth6,922
Lewisham2,492
Merton3,5523,015
Newham1,173
Redbridge6442,027
Richmond29,2794,418
Southwark4,193
Sutton3,616
Tower Hamlets1,3633,473
Waltham Forest94,5821,964
Wandsworth5,886
Westminster2,362

Civil defence grant aid received by London boroughs 1987–88

Borough

Staff (£)

Building (£)

Other (£)

Barking and Dagenham2,1794,186
Barnet2,897
Bexley6,200
Brent1,870
Bromley3,6114,474
Camden2,545
City of London21,447
Croydon2,334
Ealing
Enfield
Greenwich1,763
Hackney2,044
Hammersmith and Fulham5,842
Haringey2,394
Harrow11,338
Havering1,568450
Hillingdon5,715
Hounslow1,2483,341
Islington1,796
Kensington and Chelsea5932,510
Kingston3,326

Borough

Staff (£)

Building (£)

Other (£)

Lambeth6,429
Lewisham2,623
Merton3,6334,298
Newham1,599
Redbridge
Richmond2,977
Southwark4,325
Sutton3,671
Tower Hamlets1,3963,854
Waltham Forest8,8313,227
Wandsworth6,035
Westminster2,095

Civil defence grant aid received by London boroughs 1988–89

Borough

Staff £

Building £

Other £

Barking and Dagenham2,4163,277
Barnet2,078
Bexley2,938
Brent2,167
Bromley2,3654,312
Camden2,902
City of London3,7445,682
Croydon2,334
Ealing
Enfield
Greenwich
Hackney1,778
Hammersmith and Fulham4,840
Haringey2,663
Harrow8,986
Havering1,6324,862
Hillingdon4,111
Hounslow1,2991,553
Islington1,858
Kensington and Chelsea9502,390
Kingston11,177
Lambeth7,359
Lewisham3,833
Merton
Newham1,531
Redbridge
Richmond1,648
Southwark5,288
Sutton3,855
Tower Hamlets
Waltham Forest1,948
Wandsworth6,888
Westminster2,415

Civil defence grant aid received by London boroughs 1989–90(Estimated)

Borough

Staff £

Building £

Other £

Barking and Dagenham2,2803,240
Barnet3,070
Bexley
Brent
Bromley4,3504,710
Camden3,000
City of London9,5005,800
Croydon2,240
Ealing
Enfield
Greenwich1,660
Hackney2,240
Hammersmith and Fulham4,669
Haringey3,318
Harrow8,560
Havering
Hillingdon5,265
Hounslow1,7302,200
Islington

Borough

Staff £

Building £

Other £

Kensington and Chelsea4,900
Kingston12,500
Lambeth6,734
Lewisham
Merton
Newham2,810
Redbridge920300
Richmond1,670
Southwark4,650
Sutton3,500
Tower Hamlets
Waltham Forest
Wandsworth6,074
Westminster

Accountancy Firms

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many outside accountancy firms are employed by his Department; whether such employment is subject to any guidelines; and whether he takes steps before employing an accountancy firm to discover whether that firm has been censured by Department of Trade and Industry inspectors in their inquiries under the Companies Act.

[holding answer 14 December 1989]: The Home Office is currently employing four accountancy firms. Contracts are awarded which provide value for money from competent firms, after consultations as necessary and where appropriate, in the light of advice given by Her Majesty's Treasury.

Arts And Design

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what expenditure was made by his Department on (a) the arts and (b) design in the last financial year.

[holding answer 21 December 1989]: A number of items of my Department's expenditure—for example, the provision and maintenance of prisons and programmes for prisoners, and the production of various publications—contain elements that could be classified as expenditure on arts and—or design, but in general it is not practicable to separate and cost those elements.All prison education departments provide courses in art and craft work, but, because these courses are part of the total education provision, it is not possible to identify separately expenditure on them. Expenditure on the annual Koestler Trust exhibition of prisoners' art and craft is estimated to have been £20,000 in 1988–89.

Energy

Plutonium

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy at what point plutonium created in civil reactors under safeguards becomes no longer subject to safeguards when distributed in plutonium-contaminated wastes at Sellafield.

Detailed discussions are continuing with the international safeguards authorities on the safeguards to be applied to waste containing civil nuclear material.

Euratom Annual Safeguards Report

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy if he has received a copy of the 1988–89 Euratom annual safeguards report from the European Commission.

Neighbourhood Energy Action

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy from what percentage of projects in England and Wales Neighbourhood Energy Action has received statistical returns.

In the latest two quarters for which information is available (April to June and July to September 1989) the response rates of projects in England and Wales providing statistical returns to Neighbourhood Energy Action were both over 99 per cent.

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy if he will itemise the progress made by the Energy Efficiency Office in developing quality indicators for Neighbourhood Energy Action projects.

All community insulation projects operating under employment training are contracted to undertake a "standard job" to a specification provided by Neighbourhood Energy Action. In addition, that organisation with the support of the Energy Efficiency Office, is continuing to develop certified training for the benefit of both project staff and trainees.

Gas-Fired Power Stations

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy if he will list all the schemes for gas-fired power stations which are known to his Department giving in each case details of the progress of applications for consent to build and operate them and the names of the organisations concerned.

Not all gas-fired projects known to my Department are in the public domain, and I must respect the wish for commercial confidentiality where it exists. The projects that have been made public, and the consents that I have so far given are:

CompanyProjectConsents received
Lakeland PowerRoosecoteGas burn consent
Thames PowerBarkingGas burn consent
Hawker SiddeleyCorbyGas burn consent
PeterboroughGas burn consent
Lasmo/RangerSouth DenesGas burn consent
British SugarBrigg
ShellShellhaven
ICl/EnronWilton
Sheffield Heat & PowerSheffield
CEGBKillingholme (A)Gas burn consent
Little BarfordGas burn consent
Killingholme(PowerGen)Gas burn consent
Rye HouseGas burn consent
The stations planned by the CEGB would require capital investment approval in addition to consents from me under section 2 of the Electric Lighting Act 1909. I shall reach decisions in due course. I cannot comment on the position on other consents or authorisations which may be required for these stations from other authorities.

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy what assessment his Department has made of the likely impact on employment in the mining industry of the proposed gas-fired power station at Killingholme.

It will be for the British Coal Corporation to assess the implications for its manpower requirements of changes in fuel purchasing arrangements within the United Kingdom.

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy what effect the European Community directive prohibiting the use of national gas for power generation is likely to have on gas-fired power station proposals in the United Kingdom.

The use of gas for power generation is not prohibited by EEC directive 75/404; rather, its use has to meet certain criteria. The Government assess gas-powered generation project proposals against the criteria in the directive, such as the thermal efficiency and environmental impact of the plant.

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy what estimate his Department has made of the likely impact of gas-fired power stations on the consumption of coal in power stations.

My Department makes no such estimates; decisions on fossil fuel choice are matters for the industry. Mechanistic scenarios, which are not to be construed as estimates, illustrating the technical options which may be available to curtail emissions of the greenhouse gases from the United Kingdom are however contained in my Department's paper "An evaluation of energy-related greenhouse gas emissions and measures to ameliorate them", a copy of which is in the Library of the House. Section 2 of chapter 5 deals with alternative fossil-fuelled power generation.

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy (1) what is his Department's estimate of the likely increase in gas-fired generating capacity in the United Kingdom in each year to 1995;(2) what is his Department's estimate of the likely percentage of electricity to be generated by gas-fired power stations in each year to 1995.

This depends on the growth of demand and on decisions to be taken by the electricity industry.

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy, when he expects to announce his decision on the application to build a gas-fired power station at Killingholme.

The CEGB has submitted two applications for my consent under section 2 of the Electric Lighting Act 1909 to construct combined cycle gas turbine power stations at Killingholme. My officials are currently discussing a number of points relevant to my consideration of the applications with the CEGB, the relevant local planning authorities and other Government Departments. I will announce my decisions on the two applications when I am ready to do so.

Energy Efficiency

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy what financial resources will be made available to the Director General of Electricity Supply to promote energy efficiency and electricity conservation measures.

The Office of Electricity Regulation will be financed by vote with its costs covered through licence fees. It will be for the director general to assess the resources he needs and to manage those resources in the most appropriate way to meet his statutory duties.Close links are being established between his office and the Energy Efficiency Office to ensure that they both complement and reinforce one another's work in the important area of energy efficiency.

Energy Conservation

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy if he will amend the draft licence for electricity suppliers to allow cost-pass-through for energy conservation measures.

I am reviewing the conditions in all the electricity licences with a view to publishing revised versions of the licences shortly.

Education And Science

Grants

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science, pursuant to his reply to the hon. Member for Oxford, East, Official Report, 18 December, columns 36–40, if he will publish the numbers of students on which his calculations are based for each year from 1990 to 2027.

The table gives estimates of the numbers of students eligible for loans from 1990–91 to 2000–01 inclusive. The basis is the United Kingdom. The figures in annex E of the White Paper rest on a series of assumptions, one being that numbers remain constant after the end of the century. This assumption also applies to the revised estimates of costs and savings.

United Kingdom numbers eligible for loans
Year(000s)
1990569·2
1991582·2
1992584·6
Calendar Year198519861987198811989
Number of maintained secondary schools approved for closure1061171079294
(i) girls' schoolsn.a.n.a.n.a.79
(ii) boys' schoolsn.a.n.a.n.a.97
(iii) mixed schoolsn.a.n.a.n.a.7678
(iv) voluntary schools183323187
(v) county schools8884847487
Number of maintained secondary schools for which proposals were approved for significant change of character3175183537
(i) girls' schools123
(ii) boys' schools11312
(iii) mixed schools2974153232

Year

(000s)

1993580·6
1994576·4
1995574·3
1996581·6
1997600·0
1998625·7
1999645·1
2000655·5

Disabled Students

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he has any plans to revise the guidelines to local education authorities concerning administration of the disabled students allowance; and if he will make a statement.

As I indicated in the reply that I gave to my right hon. Friend on 19 December 1989 at columns 219–20, guidance is normally issued to local education authorities following the revision of the mandatory awards regulations. My right hon. Friend will consider later this year what if any new guidance is needed on the disabled students' allowance, after he has reviewed the contents of the regulations in the light of representations received.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science whether students who become disabled during their course will continue to receive loans.

An eligible student who becomes disabled will remain eligible for loans.

Secondary Schools

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science, further to his answer to the hon. Member for Epping Forest of 29 November, Official Report, columns 261–2, if he will break down the information in (a) and (b) on closures and significant changes of character of secondary schools by the categories (i) to (v) which he has applied in the case of enlarged schools under (c).

The information is given in the table. Figures in respect of school closures are for the total number of schools approved for closure in a given year; the equivalent figures in my answer of 29 November were net of new schools established as a result of amalgamations. Disaggregated figures by gender before 1988 are not available.

Calendar Year

1985

1986

1987

1988

1

1989

(iv) voluntary schools23255
(v) county schools2972163032

1 To 31 October 1989.

Single-Sex Schools

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he will list by gender of pupils and name single-sex schools which have been closed since 1985.

The names of the single sex maintained and non-maintained schools that have closed in 1985 and onwards are given in the table. The table includes maintained schools that have been closed following the approval of statutory proposals; in some cases for the purpose of amalgamation.The table is not fully up to date as some replies from local education authorities are still awaited confirming closures in 1989.Independent schools are shown in the education authority in which they are situated.

Local education authoritySchool name
Girls Schools Closed since 1985
BarnetSouthaw Girls
BexleySidcup Girls School
BromleyRavensbourne School for Girls
Rock Hill School for Girls
Beckenham Convent School
CroydonLady Edridge Girls High
Selhurst Girls High School
Purley Girls High School
EalingSt. Annes Convent School
HarrowWhite Gate Senior School for Girls
NewhamLondon School of Islamics
Waltham ForestConnaught High School for Girls
Leyton Manor High School for Girls
Warwick High School for Girls
Leyton Senior High Schools for Girls
Walthamstow Senior High School for Girls
BirminghamErdington School
Longmeadow School
CoventryCardinal Wiseman Roman Catholic Secondary School for Girls
WolverhamptonEly House Girls School
KnowsleyKnowsley St. Gregorys Roman Catholic Girls Comprehensive
LiverpoolSt. Teresas Roman Catholic Junior Girls
Stanley Park Girls County Comprehensive
Aigburth Vale Girls County Comprehensive
Childwall Valley Girls County Comprehensive
Liverpool Institute Girls High School
Queen Marys Girls County Comprehensive
Allerton Priory
St. HelensMount Carmel Roman Catholic High School
Notre Dame Roman Catholic High

Local education authority

School name

SeftonSt. Augustines Roman Catholic High
WirralBebington Secondary School for Girls Oxley School
The Marian Roman Catholic High
Avalon High School
Hoylake Coaching Centre
ManchesterThe Hollies Roman Catholic High School for Girls
St. Josephs Roman Catholic High School for Girls
StockportPriestnall School
TraffordUrmston Grammar for Girls
Stretford Grammar for Girls
SheffieldIslamia Girls High School
BradfordTinakori Towers School
CalderdaleThe Princess Mary School
Brighouse Girls Grammar School
KirkleesHyrstlands Community Home
Waverley School
Batley Muslim Girls High School
LeedsSpringfield Park Community Home
West Park Girls High
Notre Dame High School
Newcastle upon TyneThe Silverhill School
Inner LondonWandsworth Ensham
Wandsworth Garratt Green
Greenwich Park
Wandsworth Mayfield
St. Veronicas Roman Catholic Secondary
Battersea Notre Dame High School
Wandsworth Convent of the Holy Family
Sternhold College
Hugh Jones Tutor
Elvaston House School
Northcote Lodge
BerkshireReading Westwood Comprehensive
Reading Alfred Sutton Girls Comprehensive
BuckinghamshireChesham the Lowndes Secondary School for Girls
Amersham Brudenell Secondary for Girls
CambridgeshireWisbech Queens Girls Comprehensive
CumbriaAskham Church of England School
Carleton Hill School
DevonPlymouth Stoke Damerec High School for Girls
Plymouth Public High School for Girls
Plymouth Salisbury Road Girls Secondary School
Withycombe House School

Local education authority

School name

DorsetAshley Cross County Modem for Girls
Oakmead County Secondary for Girls
Queensmount School
St. Marys Gate School
East SussexCharters Towers School
St. Michaels Convent Girls School
EssexWestborough High School for Girls
Belfairs High School Girls
Eastwood High School for Girls
Gainsborough Lodge School
GloucestershireColwell School for Girls
Cheltenham Pates Grammar School for Girls
HampshireWinchester Danemark Comprehensive
Manor Girls Comprehensive
Queens Mead School
Hereford and WorcesterHallow Park School
HertfordshireStevenage Girls School
St. Angelas Roman Catholic Girls
Christs Hospital School
Poles Convent FCJ
Rosary Priory High School
Rosary Priory Preparatory School
Chorley Wood College for the Blind
Hertfordshire College of Higher Education
HumbersideFifth Avenue Junior High Girls
St. Mary High
Rise Hall School
KentMargate Lausanne Secondary School for Girls
Mailing House School
Nonington College
LancashireClitheroe Grammar for Girls
Lindenhurst College
LeicestershireMorcott Hall School
Windsor Classical Dance Centre
NorfolkKings Lynn St. James Junior Girls
Londsdale School
St. Georges School
North YorkshireMill Mount Girls Grammar
Queen Annes Girls Grammar
Burton Stone Secondary Modern
St. Margaret Clitherow Roman Catholic Secondary Modern
NorthamptonshireCroft Lodge School
Irchester Arkwright School
SomersetKingsbury School
StaffordshireSt. Josephs Convent School
SurreySunbury St. Teresas Roman Catholic
WarwickshireRugby Dunsmore School for Girls
West SussexConvent of the Family School
Summerlea School
Springfield Park School
Hatchlands School
Summerfold School

Local education authority

School name

Boys Schools Closed since 1985

BarnetHolmewood Preparatory School
Haynes School
BexleyParklands School
BrentSt. Benedicts Community Home
BromleyRavensbourne School for Boys
Kentwood School for Boys
CroydonNorbury Manor Boys High
Selhust Boys High School
Purley Boys High School
EnfieldSt. Ignatius College
St. Ignatius College Lower School
HaringeyThe Somerset School
HarrowHarrow High School
HillingdonPark Place School
Kingston-upon-ThamesArundel House School
RedbridgeLondon School of Islamics
SuttonCheam CE Junior Boys
Glastonbury High School for Boys
Wilsons School
Waltham ForestGeorge Mitchell High School for Boys
Norlington High School for Boys
Warwick High School for Boys
Leyton Senior High
Sir George Monoux Senior High for Boys
BirminghamAlderlea School
Selly Oak School
CoventryCardinal Wiseman Roman Catholic Secondary School for Boys
WalsallDruids Heath Community Home
The Queslett School
WolverhamptonNordley Special School
KnowsleyKnowsley St. Kevins Roman Catholic Boys Comprehensive
LiverpoolAnfield County Comprehensive
Alsop Boys County Comprehensive
Collegiate Boys County Comprehensive
Liverpool Institute Boys High School
Hillfoot Hey Boys County Comprehensive
St. HelensCampion Roman Catholic High School
West Park Roman Catholic High School
SeftonBishops Court School
WirralBebington Secondary School for Boys
The Henry Meoles School
Bishop Challoner Roman Catholic High
The Leas School
ManchesterRosehill Observation and Assessment Centre
St. Marks Roman Catholic High School for Boys
St. Pius Roman Catholic High School for Boys

Local education authority

School name

De La Salle College of Education
SalfordThe Bezalel High School
StockportStockport School
TraffordStretford Grammar for Boys
Urmston Grammar for Boys
WiganWorthington Burtholme Hostel
SheffieldLimb Lane School (Family Shirecliffe House)
CalderdaleThe Heath School
Hipperholme Grammar School
Rastrick Grammar School
LeedsMoor Grange Boys High
St. Michaels Roman Catholic College
Harewood Bridge House School
Newcastle upon TyneCondercum House School
Eastview School
Castledene School
Kenton Lodge School
SunderlandWashington Hall School
Milton Hall School
Inner LondonLambeth Henry Thornton
Wandsworth School
Wandsworth Spencer Park
Wandsworth Sir Walter St. Johns School
Wandsworth Clapham College
Hammersmith London Oratory Roman Catholic
Wandsworth John Griffiths Roman Catholic Secondary
St. Josephs Academy Pre-Prep School
St. Vedast Independent School for Boys
Life Christian School
St. Aloysius Junior Shool
Edward Rudolf Memorial Special School
Heathermount School
Shephall Manor School
Nathaniel Heckford School
Winceby House School
London School of Nautical Cookery
BerkshireReading Stoneham Comprehensive
Reading Alfred Sutton Boys Comprehensive
Reading Collegiate School
BuckinghamshireAmersham The Raans Secondary School for Boys
Cestreham Secondary Boys School
Beckets Senior School
Beckets Preparatory School
Divine Mercy College
CambridgeshireWisbech Queens Boy Comprehensive
CheshireTorpenhow School
DerbyshireFernilee Infant
Frank Merifield School

Local education authority

School name

DevonForde Park Community Home
Plymouth Sutton High School for Boys
Plymouth Public High School for Boys
Plymouth Widey High School for Boys
Plymouth Prince Rock Boys Secondary School
Brunel School
Montpelier School
Heathercombe Brake School
Dawlish College
Heanton School
Russell College (Family Dennington College)
Ward House School
Lupton House School
St. Pauls College
Swallow Cliff School
Morice School
DorsetSeldown County Secondary Boys
Oakmead County Secondary School for Boys
Stinsford School
DurhamRedworth Hall Residential School
East SussexCentral Boys Club
Strickland House School
Great Sanders School
Rotherfield Hall
EssexEastwood High School for Boys
Fairfax High School for Boys
Belfairs High School for Boys
Copford College
GloucestershireCheltenham Grammar School for Boys
Whitefriars School
Badgeworth Court School
Dowdeswell Court School
Washbournes Place School
Advicenna College
HampshireWinchester Montgomery of Alamein Boys Comprehensive
Heron Wood Boys Comprehensive
Drayton Manor School
Oakmore School
Mile End House School
Ark Family Units
Kinloss School
Hereford and WorcesterCathedral Preparatory School
Cotsbrook School
Bodenham Manor School
HertfordshireBushey Grange Park
St. Michaels Roman Catholic Boys
HumbersideCastle Howard Community Home
Hull Grammar School
Endike Junior High Boys
Riley High Boys
Marist College Boys School
KentMargate St. Johns Church of England Secondary School for Boys
Winchester House School
Foxbush School
St. Vincent School
LancashireUpholland College
LincolnshireHolbeach Eastfields Hostel
NorfolkKings Lynn St. James Junior Boys
Duncan Hall School

Local education authority

School name

North YorkshireNunthorpe Boys Grammar
St. Georges Roman Catholic Secondary Modern
Ingmanthorpe Hall School
NottinghamshireSt. Hughs College
OxfordshireSmith Hospital School
SalopApley Park School
Castle Hill School
SomersetKing Alfred School
Barwick House School
Midelney Place School
StaffordshireNeedwood School for the Partially Hearing
SuffolkNowton Court School
The Development Centre
SurreySunbury Cardinal Godfrey Roman Catholic
Allen House School
WarwickshireRugby Dunsmore School for Boys
West SussexFernden School
Goring Hall School
St. Johns College
Pennfold School
Dalesdown. School
WiltshireSt. Probus School

Local Management Schemes

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he will publish a table to show such information as he has to hand from the schemes for local management of schools submitted for his approval by local education authorities under the headings (a) the value of the general schools budget, (b) the value of the mandatory exceptions, (c) the value of the aggregate schools budget, (d)(b) as a percentage of (a) and (e)(c) as a percentage of (a).

A table giving such information as is available will be published very shortly.

Teacher Shortages

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science how many children have not been receiving full in-school education since the start of the 1989 autumn term in (a) Vauxhall constituency, (b) Lambeth, (c) the Inner London area, (d) the Greater London area and (e) nationally.

The particular data requested are not all available to the Department. At the beginning of the 1989 autumn term, some 200 primary pupils in the area of the Inner London education authority, including about 100 in Lambeth, were sent home from school because of the shortage of teaching staff. The authority was able to recruit more teachers during the term and all these pupils returned to school. Other pupils, on a rotation basis, have been sent home for short spells. The authority is continuing to monitor the situation, and is keeping the Department informed.

The Department does not have equivalent information in respect of the other London boroughs or other parts of the country.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science what action his Department will be taking to tackle teacher shortages, particularly in inner-city areas.

I refer the hon. Member to the reply I gave to my hon. Friend the Member for Hexham (Mr. Amos) on 14 November 1989 at column 235. In addition, the teaching as a career unit will be assisting in a Londonwide recruitment campaign in collaboration with the ILEA and the London boroughs. My right hon. Friend has also asked the interim advisory committee to look at measures to improve supply in areas where vacancy rates are highest—particularly in Inner London.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science what percentage of graduates entered a career in teaching in each of the last 10 years.

Statistics of graduates entering teaching and of the total number of graduates can not readily be compiled on a common basis, so a precise calculation of the first as a percentage of the second is not possible. The table provides the best approximation that can be made from the available data.

(thousands)
1(1)2(2)Ratio of to (2)
197811·9
197915·1
198015·079·80·19
198112·882·90·15
198211·386·90·13
198311·891·70·13
198411·697·40·12
198510·299·30·10
198610·4102·10·10
198710·7104·00·10
1988106·2
1989107·5
1 Graduates newly entering full-time service in maintained nursery, primary and secondary schools in England and Wales in the 12 months ending 31 March of the year shown.
2 First degree United Kingdom domiciled graduates from institutions in England and Wales in the previous academic year (including the Open University). (Figures include an element of estimation).

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science what were the total numbers of teachers leaving the profession each year for the last 10 years, indicating whether the reason was (a) retirement and (b) entering a new profession.

The number of teachers leaving full-time service in maintained nursery, primary and secondary schools in England in each of the last 10 years for which figures are available is as follows:

Year ending 31 March
All figures in thousands
Number
197829·8
197932·7
198034·5
198133·5
198230·8
198329·4

Number

198429·6
198531·1
198631·2
198729·0

Information on the nature of these departures is available only for the last two years, and even then does not provide a complete breakdown of destinations. The available data are:

Year ending 31 March

1986 per cent.

1987 per cent.

Percentage of teachers leaving full-time service in maintained nursery, primary and secondary schools in England who:
transferred to other service, full or part-time, in the maintained sector in England or Wales11517
transferred to teaching outside the maintained sector144
retired or died3430
others4749

1 The Department's "Database of Teacher Records" does not provide complete coverage of the non-maintained sector nor of part-time service within the maintained sector, so these figures may be slightly understated (with the "others" correspondingly overstated).

The "others" category in this table includes teachers leaving for alternative non-teaching employment, but also those withdrawing for family reasons. The sex and age distribution of these cases (more than half are women aged 25–39) suggests that the latter group are a substantial part of the whole.

National Curriculum

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science whether it is his policy that the 10 subjects of the national curriculum should take up approximately 70 per cent. of the school timetable and that the remaining 30 per cent. should be left for schools to use at their own discretion.

Section 4(3) of the Education Reform Act makes it clear that it is for schools themselves to determine how much time should be devoted to the subjects of the national curriculum. I would expect that in key stages 1 to 3 schools will devote the great majority of curriculum time to the national curriculum subjects and to religious education, as they have done in the past. In key stage 4, I would expect that schools will offer some optional subjects outside the national curriculum.

Student Loans Company

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science how may people are likely to be employed by the Government to run the Student Loans Company.

Some 130 people are likely to be employed by the Student Loans Company by December 1990. There will be some increase in numbers thereafter as the collections department staff are employed and take-up is known.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he will estimate profit levels for the Student Loans Company in each of the next 10 years.

The Student Loans Company will operate at cost. Any income will be offset against the administration costs which will be met by the Government.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he will estimate the cost to the Government of running the Student Loans Company for (a) 1990, (b) 1991, (c) 1992, (d) 1993, (e) 1994 and (f) 1995.

The annual administrative costs of the Student Loans Company will be in the order of £10 million to £20 million.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science what is the estimated cost of transferring the Student Loans Company into the hands of the Government.

The Government have purchased the shares of the Student Loans Company Limited at a total cost of £10. The banks agreed to make a contribution of £500,000 towards the preparatory costs of the student loans scheme.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science whether the Government intend to appoint a chairman of the Student Loans Company.

An official of the Department of Education and Science has been appointed chairman of the Student Loans Company.

Employment

Police (Earnings)

To ask the Secretary of State for Employment, why earnings etc. figures have been left blank for the police in the new earnings survey.

Footnotes to the relevant tables in the new earnings survey report explain why some figures for certain occupations, including police inspectors and above, have been omitted.

Labour Statistics

To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what has been the fall in unemployment since June 1987; and if he will make a statement.

Since June 1987 the level of unemployment, seasonally adjusted, in the United Kingdom has fallen by 1,207,500 to 1,649,700 in November 1989 and is now at its lowest level for over nine years.

To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what was the rise in the number of people in employment in the last quarter; and what were the comparable figures for other countries in the European Community.

In the second quarter of 1989, the latest date for which information is available, the civilian work force in employment in the United Kingdom rose by 82,000 (0·3 per cent.) to 26,033,000. Quarterly data are published by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation

European comparisons of civilian employment
Seasonally adjusted
Thousands
Q4 1988Q1 1989Q2 1989Changes Q1 1989 to Q2 1989
ThousandsPercentage
United Kingdom25,78725,95126,0338203
Germany26,84227,01127,075640·2
Italy20,70020,69520,674-21-0·1
Spain11,89512,05312,2081551·3
Portugal4,3224,363n.a.410·9
France121,264n.a.n.a.n.a.n.a.
1 Figures for France are unadjusted and are published only for the fourth quarter of each year.

Source: "Quarterly Labour Force Statistics 3/1989" (OECD) except United Kingdom (ED).

Property Services Agency

To ask the Secretary of State for Employment if he has any conveniently available figures for the (a) value, and (b) size of Department of Employment property being removed by the Property Services Agency; and how much priority one Department of Employment property is not being renovated, owing to shortage of funds.

The Department of Employment occupies approximately 604,000 sq m of the civil estate, but figures are not conveniently available for the value of these occupations.Responsibility for maintenance of the civil estate, under the property repayment system (PRS) arrangements, is shared between PSA and Departments. On 24 May 1989, Sir Gordon Manzie, the chief executive of the PSA, informed the Environment Committee that, at current funding levels, it should be possible to clear the backlog of priority maintenance work on the civil estate as a whole by 1995–96. There is, however, no readily available information relating the backlog to individual Department occupations.

Unemployment Benefit

To ask the Secretary of State for Employment how many claimants have completed the UB671 since its inception; and how many have been disallowed benefit as a result, for each quarter and by each standard region.

Jobstart Scheme

To ask the Secretary of State for Employment how many people have participated in the 50-plus jobstart scheme in each of the pilot areas; what was the average hourly pay earned by participants, excluding the £20 a week allowance, what was the average amount of hours worked per week by participants; and how many participants remained in employment after the allowance had ceased.

Between the start of the 50-plus Jobstart pilots on 26 June and 15 December 1989 a total of 61 people were accepted on the programme. The breakdown of the number of people on the programme and their average hours and wages by area is as follows:

and Development in respect of some European countries and data for recent quarters are shown in the following table:

Area

Participants

Average hourly wage £

Average hours

Dudley and Sandwell142·0020·0
Leeds272·2018·7
London South12·0020·0
Lothian and Borders192·2717·4

Unemployment Benefits (Adjudication)

To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what is the average length of time between a claimant's referral for adjudication and an adjudication officer's decision on grounds of actively seeking work, by standard regions in Great Britain.

The information requested is not available and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what is the average length of time between a claimant's referral for adjudication and an adjudication officer's decision on grounds of refusal of employment by standard Great Britain regions.

Information is not available in the precise form requested. However, the speed with which adjudication officers make decisions—that is, the time between their receiving a referral and reaching a decision—is monitored in a 5 per cent. sample of cases. The sample shows that for the three-month period ending 30 September 1989, the percentage of refusal of employment questions decided within four weeks of referral to an adjudication officer, for each employment service region, was as follows:

Refusal of employment
per cent.
Northern100
Yorkshire and Humberside73
East Midlands65
Eastern94
Southern73
Western75
West Midlands92
SouthWest72
Wales100
North West81
Scotland71

Footwear And Textile Industries

To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what numbers of jobs there have been in (a) footwear and (b) textile industries for each year since 1979; and how many have been lost in each industry in 1989, by month.

Employees in the footwear and textile industries (SIC 80)
Great Britain(thousands)
Footwear SIC group 4511989 monthly changeTextiles SIC class 431989 monthly change
June 197968·8371·4
June 198065·3324·8
June 198158·8273·0
June 198253·5256·2
June 198351·4238·8
June 198452·8233·5
June 198551·1234·5
June 198651·9238·2
June 198750·8229·0
June 198849·5231·0
December 198848·9225·9
January 198948·7-0·2223·3-2·6
February 198948·2-0·5219·5-3·8
March 198947·7-0·5218·6-0·9
April 198947-2-0·5217·6-1·0
May 198946·8-0·4216·5-1·0
June 198946·6-0·2217·81·3
July 198946·4-0·2215·5-2·3
August 198945·7-0·7215·70·2
September 198945·3-0·4218·12·5
October 198945·2-0·1217·0-1·1

Employment Training

To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what is the total number of trainees in employment training for the most recent date for which information is available in Great Britain and in each of the standard regions, Scotland and Wales.

[holding answer 21 December 1989]: The information is not available in the precise form requested. Information is available only for the eight Training Agency regions in England and for Scotland and Wales. The latest available figures of employment training filled places are given in the table.

Employment training
Number in-training at 8 December 1989
RegionNumbers
South East14,300
London21,400
South West12,300
West Midlands23,100
East Midlands and Eastern16,900
Yorkshire and Humberside25,600
North West29,400
Northern24,500
Wales16,500
Scotland26,400
Great Britain1211,000
1 Including a small number of trainees at Residential Training Colleges and other training providers not identified separately in the regional totals.

Prime Minister

Nuclear Energy Projects

To ask the Prime Minister if she will initiate a review of all statements since 1979 made to the House by Ministers having responsibility for military and civil nuclear energy projects and programmes, to assess whether they require revision in the light of official information made public under the 30-year rule on 1 January 1990.

Eastern Europe

To ask the Prime Minister if she has any plans to meet the Heads of Government of (a) Bulgaria, (b) East Germany, and (c) Czechoslovakia, to discuss the creation of free markets in those countries.

I have no immediate plans to meet the Heads of Government of Bulgaria, East Germany or Czechoslovakia. I have no doubt that when I do meet them, economic reform will be high on the agenda.

To ask the Prime Minister what recent representations she has made to President Gorbachev regarding the political situation in eastern Europe.

We and other western Governments have kept in close contact with the Soviet authorities over developments in eastern Europe. This was one of the topics at my meeting with Mr. Shevardnadze on 19 December.

Science And The Environment

To ask the Prime Minister if she will place in the Library a copy of her speech on science and environment, given as the 50th anniversary lecture of the parliamentary and scientific committee on 6 December 1989.

Northern Ireland

Market Research

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many market research and sample surveys were carried out by or for his Department in the last 12 months; what was the cost of each; what was the total cost; how many were carried out in-house; how many were carried out for his Department by outside organisations; and what percentage of the total expenditure was paid to outside organisations.

A total of 38 sample surveys were carried out in the target period of which eight were continuous or annual surveys, for example, the family expenditure survey and the labour force survey. The remainder were ad-hoc surveys of varying size and complexity.Total expenditure was £954,000 with the costs of individual surveys ranging from £400 to £192,000. Twenty-two surveys were conducted in-house (cost £832,000) and 16 were carried out for the Department by outside organisations (cost £122,000). Payment to outside organisations accounted for 13 per cent. of total expenditure.

Public Appointments

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many persons above the age of (a) 60, (b) 65 and (c) 70 years he has appointed to public bodies in each of the last 10 years.

The information requested is as follows:

Over 60Over 65Over 70
198036
198121
198287
198344
198431
198592
198686
198733
1988117
1989251
Totals53421
The figures include reappointments.

Fishery Conservancy Board

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many statutory pollution samples have been taken by the Northern Ireland Fishery Conservancy Board in the past 12 months; what was the cost of taking each sample; how many such samples proved positive; how many such samples resulted in prosecution in court; and how many such prosecutions were successful.

During 1988, the latest period for which complete statistics are available, 198 statutory samples were taken by the Fisheries Conservancy Board for Northern Ireland. Information on the cost of taking each sample is not readily available and could be compiled only at disproportionate cost.All the statutory samples proved to be polluting. Of these samples, 98 resulted in prosecution in court with 92 leading to convictions; four cases are still pending.

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how the Northern Ireland Fishery Conservancy Board is funded: what is the total number of bailiffs employed by the Northern Ireland Fishery Conservancy Board; what is the number of permanent bailiffs employed; what is the average probationary period served by a bailiff before he becomes permanent.

The Fisheries Conservancy Board for Northern Ireland is responsible for the conservation and protection of salmon and inland fisheries of Northern Ireland other than the fisheries of the Londonderry area of the Foyle Fisheries Commission. The board derives licence revenue from commercial fishermen and anglers to offset the cost of carrying out those functions. In addition the board carries out and receives agency fees for water pollution control work on behalf of the Department of the Environment for Northern Ireland and providing bailiffs for public fisheries on behalf of the Department of Agriculture for Northern Ireland. The total number of bailiffs presently employed by the board is 48: of these, 14 are permanent bailiffs.While the turnover of permanant staff is small, the probationary period for a new permanent bailiff is six months after which the appointment is confirmed, subject, of course, to a satisfactory report. This period may be extended or the appointment terminated in the event of an unsatisfactory report.

Strangford Lough

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will replace the CNCC with a democratically constituted council; and if he will make a statement about public participation in the management of area of special scientific interest Strangford lough part 3.

The Council for Nature Conservation and the Countryside (CNCC) was recently established under the provisions of article 3 of the Nature Conservation and Amenity Lands (Amendment) (Northern Ireland) Order 1989, and its constitution was very carefully considered. The membership of the council represents a wide range of interests and experience throughout Northern Ireland. It provides sound and balanced views on conservation matters. There are no plans to amend the legislation.The management of the lands within the Strangford lough (part 3) area of special scientific interest (ASSI) depends on co-operation between individual owners and occupiers and the Department of the Environment for Northern Ireland. It is not an appropriate matter for public participation.

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what proposals he has to involve the loughside community in the management of the Strangford lough foreshores; and if he will make a statement.

The management of the Strangford lough area of special scientific interest (ASSI), which mainly comprises the Strangford lough foreshores, is a matter between the individual owners and occupiers and the Department of the Environment for Northern Ireland. At the time the declaration of Strangford lough (part 3) ASSI was confirmed I stated that a locally based and organised voluntary group representative of the wide variety of interests concerned could be very useful to the Department in preparing its proposals for the marine nature reserve in Strangford lough. I also indicated that I hoped that local people would take forward this suggestion which I had welcomed.

Agricultural Advisory Service

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what amount of money has been received for advice given following the introduction of charges by the Agricultural Advisory Service; how many persons have been given advice; and what were the comparable figures for the equivalent period prior to the introduction of charges.

Following the introduction of charging by the advisory services of the Department of Agriculture for Northern Ireland in October 1988 a total of £224,000 has been received up to November 1989.Advice, some of which continues to be free, is given in a variety of ways both to individuals through farm visits, office consultations and by telephone and to groups through events, meetings, advisory letters, press articles, media broadcasts and publications notably "Agriculture in Northern Ireland". During any given period a farmer may get advice in more than one way. Currently our records which are compiled for each financial year are as follows:—

1987–881988–89
Farms Visited16,82714,442
Attendance at meetings/events34,00629,744
Advisory letters20,26838,500
Press articles416403
Media broadcasts2136
"Agriculture in Northern Ireland"12,12512,958

Harbours

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what is the level of harbour dues for (a) boats, (b) yachts and (c) other sea-going vessels at the harbours of Portrush, Ballycastle, Bangor, Ardglass and Portstewart.

[holding answer 19 December 1989]: The harbours at Portrush, Portstewart, Ballycastle and Bangor are owned and operated by the Coleraine, Moyle and North Down councils respectively and the information sought is not available in my Department.The Ardglass harbour is the responsibility of the Northern Ireland Fishery Harbour Authority. Charges at Ardglass are as follows:—

Fishing Vessels

Over 15 tons gross—£50 per annum
Under 15 tons—£25 per annum

Cargo and other commercial vessles

EC Vessels—15p per tonne per visit
Outside EC—21p per tonne per visit
If vessels stay over 1 week an extra 1 1 p per tonne is charged for each week thereafter.

All other craft

30p per metre for each week or part thereof except for vessels in a reserved area (for yachts and pleasure crafts) 15p per metre each week or part thereof.

Environment

European Environmental Monitoring

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment (1) what European Community funds are being, or will be, directed to the establishment of the European Environment Agency in 1989–90, 1990–91 and 1991–92;(2) what European Community funds are being, or will be, directed to the establishment of the European monitoring and information system in 1989–90, 1990–91 and 1991–92.

The establishment of the European Environment Agency and the European monitoring and information system are integral parts of a single proposal. As such it is inappropriate and impossible to distinguish separate expenditure elements. The cost of establishing and maintaining the agency and the underlying network in the first year of operations is estimated at 5·5 million ecu, equivalent to about £3·8 million. Budget estimates for later years are not available.

Corine Programme

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what European Community funds have so far been directed to the establishment of the CORINE programme; and what is the predicted annual funding of the programme in 1990–91 and 1991–92.

Up to 1989, 4 million ecu (£2·8 million) have been directed to the CORINE programme. For 1989, expenditure is estimated at 3 million ecu (£2·1 million) and for 1990 expenditure earmarked at 4·5 million ecu (£3·1 million). After 1990, it is envisaged that CORINE-related work will pass to the proposed European Environment Agency.

European Environment Statistics Office

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what European Community funds will be directed to the European environment statistics office in 1990–91 and 1991–92.

A separate European environment statistics office does not exist. A four-year programme to develop regular official statistics of the environment is currently being proposed within the statistical office of the European Communities. The proposed budget for the period amounts to 13·3 million ecu, approximately £9·3 million, with £0·7 million earmarked for 1990, £1·9 million for 1991, £2·8 million for 1992 and £3·9 million for 1993.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what has been the cost to the Economic Community each year since its inception of the European environment statistics office.

A separate European environment statistics office does not exist. The statistical office of the European Communities collects, co-ordinates and disseminates statistics to assist in the formulation and monitoring of a wide range of Community policies. The office is mainly concerned with economic and social statistics; its programme of work on environmental statistics has only recently begun with appropriations being met from the general budget of the European Communities.

European Environment Agency

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment pursuant to his reply of 30 November to the hon. Member for Billericay, Official Report, column 368, if he will undertake a survey of businesses to determine their view of the usefulness of the European Environment Agency.

The objectives of the proposed European Environment Agency are to assemble, coordinate and analyse environmental information to inform and support Community environment policy. There is no intention to place further burdens on industry by surveying their views on the proposal.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will publish in the Official Report his letter of 6 December to the hon. Member for Hornsey and Wood Green concerning the seventh report of the Environment Committee of Session 1988–89, relating to the proposed European Environment Agency.

The text of my letter was as follows:

"Your Committee took evidence from my officials on 8th November and produced an admirably clear report in time for the debate in the House on 12th November; we appreciate this.
For the record I can say that Government policy is very much in line with the Committee's recommendations.
In particular:

Paragraph 1: The Committee's agreement with the DOE view on duties of the Agency is noted.
Paragraph 11: The Government agrees that "in the first instance the Agency should be set up as a Community body".
Paragraph 12: The Draft Regulation requires separate agreements to be established with third countries covering all aspects of participation; but the need to include voting rights and the financial contribution issue is noted.
Paragraph 14: The need to recognise the value of the information holding of NGO's is important and the Committee is right to stress the advantages of collaboration between the Agency and the NGO's in this area.
Paragraph 15: I shall be keeping the staffing implications of the proposal under review as far as my Department is concerned.
Paragraph 16: The Committee's support for the Government bid for the Agency to be located in the United Kingdom is welcome.
Please convey my thanks to your Committee for their speedy and helpful examination of this issue. Your findings were helpful in the discussions in the Environment Council on 28th November and you might like to know that the location of the Agency is now the only significant outstanding issue as far as Environment Ministers are concerned. You may have seen that the Government has now offered Cambridge as a suitable location; no decision has yet been taken however at Community level."

Housing Needs Index

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will make a statement on his review of the housing needs index and on the effect on the apportioning of capital funds to housing associations in the north-west of England of this review.

My hon. and learned Friend the then Minister for Housing and Planning announced on Wednesday 20 December 1989, in answer to my hon. Friend the Member for Edmonton (Dr. Twinn), his decisions on the Housing Corporation's approved development programme for 1990–91. The number of new housing association dwelling units to be approved in the north-west region is planned to increase in each of the next three years, though the proportionate increase will be less than in some other regions.

Local Government Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will place in the Library as soon as possible a full list of non-domestic revaluations arising out of the Local Government (Finance) Act 1988.

I shall make available in the Library as soon as possible microfiche copies of the draft local non-domestic rating lists for England and Wales which have been sent to local authorities by the valuation office.

Derelict Land

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment when he expects to announce his decision on the joint rolling programme submission by North Staffordshire local authorities for derelict land programme assistance; and if he will make a statement.

The Department will announce decisions on the regional distribution of derelict land grant resources for 1990–91 shortly. At the same time, we will announce the rolling programme which the Department is prepared to support.

Radioactive Waste

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if his departmental library holds copies of the International Atomic Energy Agency waste management research abstracts on radioactive waste programmes in progress.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if his departmental library receives a copy of the bimonthly information bulletin on radioactive wastes and fuel reprocessing, produced by Harwell Information Services.

Nirex (Safety Research)

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment when he expects to receive the 1988–89 report on the United Kingdom Nirex safety assessment research programme.

I understand that the report is expected to be published by the end of January 1990. Distribution of the report is a matter for United Kingdom Nirex.

Insulation

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment whether he will make cavity wall insulation and double glazing mandatory requirements in building regulations.

No. The thermal insulation standards in the Building Regulations 1985 have recently been upgraded, and we estimate that these amendments will achieve a saving of around 20 per cent. in energy requirements for space and water heating in new houses and other buildings. Cavity wall insulation and double glazing are methods of meeting these requirements, but there are also other ways of doing so. We consider that architects and builders should be allowed the maximum flexibility to choose for themselves whch is the most appropriate way of meeting the higher standards, which are due to come into force on 1 April.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will update his Department's 1985 estimates of the amount needed to be spent on the insulation of local authority houses in England and generally on heating, insulation and works to remedy condensation.

The Department's most recent estimate of the amount needed to be spent on the insulation of local authority houses in England is £880 million, and on heating, insulation and works to remedy condensation £3,100 million. These figures are based on analysis of the 1986 English house condition survey. They are at 1984 prices and therefore comparable with the Department's estimates reported in 1985.

Departmental Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment when MINIS 10 was completed; when it was placed in the Library; and if he will make a statement in its findings.

I reviewed the outcome of MINIS 10 on 3 October 1989 and subsequently authorised publication. Copies of MINIS 10 were sent to the Library on 15 November 1989.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will give for each year since 1978 the spending on loft and wall insulation measures in local authority housing stock, consistent with the figure of £146 million stated in paragraph 3·40 of the National Audit Office's "National Energy Efficiency".

[holding answer 18 December 19891: The figure given in paragraph 3.40 of the National Audit Office's report was based on analysis of the 1986 English house condition survey. Comparable figures for earlier years are not available.

Microwave Ovens (Palace Of Westminster)

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will list the location and make of each microwave oven within the Palace of Westminster.

[holding answer 18 December 1989]: A total of 14 microwave ovens in use on the parliamentary estate have been provided by my Department. They are located in either the Refreshment Department or mess facilities and comprise seven Merrychefs, five National Panasonics, one Moulinex and one Sharp.

Craven Cottage

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment (1) on what criteria he based his decision to set the date of the inquiry concerning Craven Cottage at 30 January 1990;(2) on what date Hammersmith council was notified that Mr. Palmer had been appointed to preside at the inquiry concerning Craven Cottage;(3) on what date Mr. Martin replaced Mr. Palmer on the inquiry concerning Craven Cottage; and why Hammersmith council was not given an opportunity to make representations on this matter;(4) when the date of the public inquiry on 30 January 1990 into the London borough of Hammersmith and Fulham's compulsory purchase order of Craven Cottage was set; and when his Department received the council's compulsory purchase order;(5) whether he received any representations from any person concerning the appointment of Mr. Palmer to the inquiry concerning Craven Cottage.

[holding answer 20 December 1989]: The compulsory purchase order was received on 30 May 1989 and the date of the public inquiry on 30 January 1990 was set on 25 September, after consultation with the parties on alternative dates in the usual way. The Department has no record of when Hammersmith council was told the name of the inspector. Mr. Stephen Marks was substituted for Mr. Palmer on 10 November after representations were received from the agents for the owners. It is not departmental practice to invite the parties to an inquiry to comment upon the choice of inspector.

Arts And Design

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what expenditure was made by his Department on (a) the arts and (b) design in the last financial year.

[holding answer 21 December 1989]: The Government's support for the arts, as the term is commonly used, is primarily a matter for my right hon. Friend the Minister for the Arts. I have joint responsibility with my right hon. Friend for the grant in aid to the national heritage memorial fund, and for the acceptance of land, property and works of art in lieu of tax. In the last financial year (1988–89) expenditure was split equally £3 million (£1·5 million each) and £2 million (£1 million each) respectively.

More generally my Department contributed to expenditure on the arts in 1988–89 where inner city regeneration is concerned, for example through grant in aid to urban development corporations—the London Docklands development corporation spending £75,000 in 1988–89.

Among all its activities, PSA included, the Department aims to encourage good design especially through the public bodies it sponsors. Specifically, it has incurred expenditure of £365,000 through its sponsorship of the Royal Fine Art Commission, and contributed £12,000 as its share of the costs of the housing design awards, the other contributors being the Royal Institute of British Architects and the National House Building Council.

Radioactivity

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what information on radioactivity released has been withheld in 1989 under section 8(5)(b) of the Radioactive Substances Act 1960.

It is not Government policy to reveal the existence of any authorisation to dispose of radioactive waste restricted under the terms of section 8(5)(b) of the Radioactive Substances Act 1960.

Rutland Water

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment whether he will call for a report from the National Rivers Authority into the progress of the investigation since 27 November into the death of dogs and sheep connected with the Rutland Water, and whether he will instruct the authority to complete its report in sufficient time to enable remedial action to be taken before summer 1990.

I am satisfied with the progress which the NRA is making in compiling its report into the causes of last year's toxic algae problem which will take account of the findings arising from the studies being conducted into animal deaths at Rutland Water. These are primarily matters for the NRA which I understand will address the question of remedial action in its report which it aims to complete this summer.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment whether, following the meeting between the Minister of State, the hon. and learned Member for Folkestone and Hythe (Mr. Howard) and the hon. Member for Rutland and Melton on 27 November, he has obtained copies of (a) the findings by Professor Codd of Dundee university regarding the toxicity of algae at Rutland Water and (b) the findings of the veterinary service of the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, regarding post mortems on dead dogs and sheep; when this information will be made available to the hon. Member for Rutland and Melton; and if he will make a statement.

Results of the work carried out by Professor Codd to establish the toxicity of the algae at Rutland Water have been placed on the NRA public registers. The studies being conducted by the veterinary service of MAFF and Professor Codd on the animal deaths at Rutland Water are continuing and final results are not yet available.

Water Privatisation

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment (1) what was the total cost to public funds of advertising for the privatisation of water;(2) what was the total cost to public funds of the flotation of the water industry in fees to City advisers;(3) what was the total cost to the Government of the flotation of the water industry.

It is too soon for these cost totals to be known. The full costs of the flotation of the water industry will be reported to Parliament in due course in the normal way.

Wales

Local Government Finance

24.

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what assumptions he has made with regard to those domestic rates being paid by second home owners in Wales, in preference to personal community charge; and upon what basis such non-domestic rate income will be distributed between district councils in Wales.

I have made no such assumptions. Domestic rates will not be payable by second-home owners from April 1990, whether in preference to personal community charge or otherwise. Standard community charges will be payable on domestic properties that do not constitute any person's sole or main residence; the income from these charges will accrue to the local authorities in the areas where the properties are situated—it will not be distributed between district councils in Wales.Income from non-domestic properties will be pooled and redistributed between district and county councils as an amount per head of population in each receiving authority's area.

Farm Woodlands Scheme

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales if he will make a statement about the operation of the farm woodlands scheme in Wales; and what is the current uptake.

My Department has received 38 applications for planting on 286 hectares of land. Twenty-two applications in respect of 188 hectares have already been approved, three applications for 12 hectares have either been withdrawn or rejected and those remaining are being processed.

Eggs

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales if he will undertake a review of the overall effectiveness of recent legislation affecting the egg-producing industry in Wales; and if he will make a statement.

It is too early at this stage to gauge the effectiveness of the various measures to control salmonella, since the legislation has been introduced only recently. It will be reviewed in due course.

Works Of Art

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales (1) if he will list (a) German expressionist, (b) 20th century Welsh, (c) Piccassos, (d) Dutch 17th century, (e) Italian renaissance and (f) French impressionist works of art in Wales, owned by the state; how much money each cost the state; and if he will make a statement;(2) if he will list the works of art produced in

(a) 1945 to 1964, (b) 1965 to 1977, (c) 1978–87 and (d) 1988 to 1989 owned by the state; if he will indicate which of those were produced either partly or wholly by public funding; and if he will make a statement.

We have no direct responsibility for any works of art within the categories listed. Information on items held by non-departmental public bodies is not held centrally. Items from the Government art collection are the responsibility of my right hon. Friend the Minister for the Arts.

Health

Medical Equipment

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps have been taken to act on the recommendations of the 1986 Advisory Council for Applied Research and Development report on medical equipment.

The Government's response to the report, summarising action then being taken or planned on the report's recommendations, was published in February 1987. A wide programme of improvements has been implemented and further developments in the fields of research, evaluation and equipment management are being vigorously pursued. Inter alia the research and development coordinating committee of the Department of Health, Department of Trade and Industry, Medical Research Council and the Science and Engineering Council, which meets quarterly, has made considerable progress in identifying and eliminating gaps and overlaps in the research and development medical equipment field to ensure that available resources are used as effectively as possible.

Nurses

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what instruction he has as to how many (a) trained and (b) untrained nursing staff were employed in (i) the private sector and (ii) the public sector, for each of the years 1978 to 1989; and if he will make a statement.

The available information is given in the tables.

Table 1
NHS nursing and midwifery staff in post (excluding agency) at 30 September each year, England Whole-time Equivalents1
YearsQualified2Unqualified3Total
1978188,260159,240347,500
1979192,010162,410354,420
1980197,900167,950365,860
1981212,100175,910388,010
1982219,300174,740394,040
1983223,620171,070394,680
1984227,730166,010393,740

Years

Qualified

2

Unqualified

3

Total

1985234,130162,900397,030
1986236,770160,470397,240
1987239,360158,550397,910
1988241,920155,920397,840

1 All figures are independently rounded to the nearest ten (10) wholetime equivalent.

2 Includes qualified nurses and midwives, health visitors and district nurses.

3 Includes learners and unqualified nursing staff.

Note: The figures have not been adjusted for the reduction in the working week from 40 to 37·5 hours introduced in 1980–81.

Source: DH (SM13) Annual Census of NHS Non-Medical Manpower

Table 2

Nursing staff (whole time equivalents), Independent sector hospitals, Nursing homes and Clinics, England

Year

1

Nursing staff

Total

1

Trained

1

Untrained

198212,20810,41622,623
198313,75411,91825,672
198415,44613,98629,432
198518,35417,73036,084
198621,68323,26644,949
198825,83630,61156,447

1 The figures for 1988 relate to the number in post (wholetime equivalents) at 31 March, the previous years figures relate to the numbers in post at 31 December

2 Registered nurses and midwives, enrolled nurses

3 Nursing auxiliaries/assistants and other non-registered/enrolled nursing staff

Source: SBH212 return 1982–1986

K036 return 1988