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Fishery Conservancy Board

Volume 164: debated on Monday 8 January 1990

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To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many statutory pollution samples have been taken by the Northern Ireland Fishery Conservancy Board in the past 12 months; what was the cost of taking each sample; how many such samples proved positive; how many such samples resulted in prosecution in court; and how many such prosecutions were successful.

During 1988, the latest period for which complete statistics are available, 198 statutory samples were taken by the Fisheries Conservancy Board for Northern Ireland. Information on the cost of taking each sample is not readily available and could be compiled only at disproportionate cost.All the statutory samples proved to be polluting. Of these samples, 98 resulted in prosecution in court with 92 leading to convictions; four cases are still pending.

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how the Northern Ireland Fishery Conservancy Board is funded: what is the total number of bailiffs employed by the Northern Ireland Fishery Conservancy Board; what is the number of permanent bailiffs employed; what is the average probationary period served by a bailiff before he becomes permanent.

The Fisheries Conservancy Board for Northern Ireland is responsible for the conservation and protection of salmon and inland fisheries of Northern Ireland other than the fisheries of the Londonderry area of the Foyle Fisheries Commission. The board derives licence revenue from commercial fishermen and anglers to offset the cost of carrying out those functions. In addition the board carries out and receives agency fees for water pollution control work on behalf of the Department of the Environment for Northern Ireland and providing bailiffs for public fisheries on behalf of the Department of Agriculture for Northern Ireland. The total number of bailiffs presently employed by the board is 48: of these, 14 are permanent bailiffs.While the turnover of permanant staff is small, the probationary period for a new permanent bailiff is six months after which the appointment is confirmed, subject, of course, to a satisfactory report. This period may be extended or the appointment terminated in the event of an unsatisfactory report.