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Visas (Indian Sub-Continent)

Volume 164: debated on Monday 8 January 1990

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To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people are waiting for interview in queues 1,2,3 and 4 at each British post on the Indian sub-continent, and if he will give comparable figures for 1988, 1987 and 1986.

[holding answer 18 December 1989]: The information requested is given in the table.

Estimated numbers of applicants in the Indian sub—continent awaiting their first interview for entry to the United Kingdom
Number of persons
Post1Category3
Queue 1Queue 2Queue 3Queue 4
Dhaka
End September
19866401,9001302,700
19874001,8001402,600
19882301,6001502,100
19891206501201,400
New Delhi4
End September
198670210460180
19874032060090
1988300400110
198926033090
Bombay
End September
1986120450480130
198756046040140
19883035048050
198942053090
Madras5
End September
198711016
1988
198920106
Islamabad
End September
19868806102,100740
19877909702,300850
19881,2001,6002,4001,000
19892502,3001,700940
Karachi
End September
198620601001
1987108019010
1988101802104
1989130201
Total Indian sub—continent
End September
19861,7003,2003,3003,800
19871,8003,6003,3003,600
19881,5004,1003,6003,300
19893703,6002,7002,500
1 5 or fewer
2 There were no applicants awaiting for interview in Calcutta.
3 Queue 1: Persons with a claim to the right of abode, dependent relatives over 70 years old, and special compassionate cases (first—time applicants for settlement).

Queue 2: Spouses, and children under 18 years old (first-time applicants for settlement).
Queue 3: Fiance(e)s, and other applicants (first-time applicants for settlement).
Queue 4: Re-applicants for settlement.

4 Data exclude persons seeking political asylum in the United Kingdom.

5Madras did not re-open for entry clearance work until October 1986.

6 Separate data are not available; re-applicants are included in the data for first-time applicants.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people have applied over the past year for visas to visit the United Kingdom from British posts on the Indian sub-continent; how many were (a) granted and (b) refused; and what was the average waiting time for (i) interview and (ii) secured interview.

[holding answer 18 December 1989]: In the 12 months ending 30 September 1989, 176,500 persons in the Indian sub-continent applied for a visa to visit the United Kingdom; during the same period 151,800 such applications were granted, including those granted on appeal, and 19,400 were refused initially. Visit applications were considered within 24 hours.Those applicants who then required a detailed interview were usually seen within the 24-hour period except in Madras and Islamabad where the waiting time for applicants interviewed at the end of October 1989 was two to three and eight days respectively. The average waiting time over the latest 12 months is not available centrally because of incomplete information.