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Local Government Finance

Volume 167: debated on Monday 12 February 1990

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To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment (1) what percentage of net weekly income a household in each of the regions on a weekly net income of (a) £100, (b) £150, (c) £200, (d) £250, (e) £300, (f) £400 and (g) £500 will pay in poll tax in (i) 1990–91, (ii) 1991–92 and (iii) 1992–93;(2) what percentage of net weekly income a household in Greater London on a weekly net income of

(a) £100, (b) £150, (c) £200, (d) £250, (e) £300, (f) £400 and (g) £500 will pay in poll tax in (i) 1990–91, (ii) 1991–92 and (iii) 1992–93;

(3) what percentage of net weekly income a household on a weekly net income of (a) £100, (b) £150, (c) £200, (d) £250, (e) £300, (f) £400 and (g) £500 will pay in poll tax in (i) 1990–91, (ii) 1991–92 and (iii) 1992–93.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what estimate he has made as to the amount towards the cost of local government that will be contributed under the community charge system by the top 10 per cent. of all households by income, taking tax payments to central Government into account, and the amount that will be contributed by the poorest 10 per cent. of households by income.

About 15 times as much will be contributed to the cost of local government by the top 10 per cent. of households by income compared with the poorest 10 per cent.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what poll tax payments are due from a full-time mature student on a full grant but with no other source of income who owns his own home, which has no other occupants, and who is living and studying away from home.

[holding answer 8 February 1990]: A person who is following a full-time course of education for the purposes of the student relief will be liable to pay 20 per cent. of the personal community charge at his term-time address. If that person also owns domestic property in which there is no person solely or mainly resident, he will be subject to the standard community charge in respect of that property. However, guidance already issued by the Department has suggested that local authorities should use the wide discretion available to them to specify this class of circumstance as one where the standard community charge multiplier is zero.