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Retirement Pensions

Volume 173: debated on Thursday 24 May 1990

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To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security (I) what would be the additional cost, net of savings in other benefits, of reducing the male state retirement pension age to 64, 63, 62, 61 and to 60 years (a) on the basis of current male contributor dependant and survivor benefit rights and (b) on the basis that male contributors receive the same dependant and survivor rights as female contributors do currently;(2) what would be the saving, net of additional costs in other benefits, of increasing the female state retirement pension to 61, 62, 63, 64 and 65 years

(a) on the basis of current female contributor dependant and survivor rights and (b) on the basis that female contributors receive the same dependant and survivor rights as male contributors do currently.

To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security what is his estimate of the number of women pensioners and the proportion of total women pensioners, who receive a reduced pension as a result of the married woman's half test.

Complete figures are not available in the form requested. The latest available figures show that on 31 March 1989 there were 6·11 million women pensioners in Great Britain.

To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security at what age the state retirement pension age could be equalised at nil additional cost taking savings in other benefits into account.

Information is not available in the precise form requested. The latest available figures based on 1985–86 benefit rates are that the cost of equalisation at age 63 is £800 million while at age 65 there is a saving of £500 million.