Skip to main content

Written Answers

Volume 181: debated on Friday 23 November 1990

The text on this page has been created from Hansard archive content, it may contain typographical errors.

Written Answers To Questions

Friday 23 November 1990

Education And Science

Welsh Students

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he will publish the figures for the number of students in each university college in Wales who were normally resident in Wales for both 1989 and 1990; and if he will publish the figures in percentage form of the total number of students attending each college.

The numbers of students in academic year 1989–90 in each university college in Wales of Welsh domicile, and as expressed as percentages of the total numbers of students attending each college, are given in the table. The data cover all students whether full time, part time, undergraduate or postgraduate.The numbers for 1990 are not yet available.

Total education spendingTeachers' salaries
Cash terms1989–90 pricesIncreaseCash terms1989–90 pricesIncrease
£ billion£ billionPer cent.£ billion£ billionPer cent.
1970–712·616·50·64·1
1980–8112·921·9333·76·354
1988–8922·023·476·67·011
1989–9024·124·13n.a.n.a.

Notes:

1. The total education spending figures are drawn from the relevant Public Expenditure White Papers.

2. The figures for spending on teachers' salaries are drawn from local authority spending returns. Data for 1989–90 are not yet available. Spending on teachers' salaries includes on-cost such as superannuation. No account is taken of changes in teacher numbers over the period shown.

3. The "increase" column shows the increase in spending at 1989–90 prices over the previous year shown.

4. The figures at 1989–90 prices have been calculated using latest GDP deflators.

Teachers

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he will state on the same basis as his reply of 12 November, Official Report, column 46, the actual number of pupils being educated by local education authorities in 1960, 1970, 1980, 1989 and 1990, together with the pupil-teacher ratio in each case, based on actual numbers, showing also the change between 1970 and 1989 in actual and percentage terms.

The information requested for local education authority-maintained nursery, primary and secondary schools is given in the table.

January each yearActual teacher numbers (thousands)Actual pupil numbers (thousands)Ratio of actual pupil numbers to actual teacher numbers
19601
1970347·87,537·221·7
1980455·78,275·518·2
1989421·06,900·516·4
19902424·6
University of Wales—1989
Total students all domicilesWelsh domicilePercentage Welsh domicile
Aberystwyth3,9291,09928
Bangor3,60691325
Cardiff9,3003,30236
Lampeter89718020
Swansea5,7251,67729
UWCM1,12043939
Total24,5777,61031

Source: Universities Statistical Record.

State Education

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he will show the total expenditure on state education in actual and 1989 prices in 1960, 1970, 1980 and 1989, showing the percentage increase in 1989 prices, and also the amount spent on teachers' salaries and related costs in each case in actual and percentage terms.

Data for 1960 are not readily available. The available data for subsequent years on total United Kingdom education spending, and on spending on school teachers' salaries in England, are as follows:

1 Not readily available.

2 Data on pupil numbers are not yet available.

Teacher numbers increased by 73,200, or 21 per cent., between 1970 and 1989. Pupil numbers decreased by 636,700 or 8 per cent. and the ratio of actual pupil numbers to actual teacher numbers also decreased by 24 per cent. over the same period.

Council For National Academic Awards

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science when he expects to be in a position to respond on behalf of the Government to the conclusions reached by the report of the review of the Council for National Academic Awards.

I cannot yet say. The Government recognise the support for some change revealed by the consultations on the report's recommendations. However, the right for institutions to award their own degrees cannot be taken as an issue on its own. The report also raises important questions about which institutions should have this right, and about the nature of future quality assurance arrangements. We need to consider these further.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science (1) if he will set out the criteria currently required of those who seek to qualify for Council for National Academic Awards status; and whether any changes are proposed in future;(2) if he will make a statement as to how the estimated numbers likely to secure Council for National Academic Awards status as set out in paragraph 10.7 of his Department's review of the Council for National Academic Awards were arrived at;(3) what representations he has received from those institutions which may be denied Council for National Academic Awards status as proposed by the conclusions of the committee reviewing the Council for National Academic Awards.

Any educational institution or training organisation may apply to the Council for National Academic Awards for validation of its courses. If successful it is granted "associated" status and may later seek "accredited" status. The departmental policy review of the CNAA recommended that associated status should be phased out over a period, and that associated institutions should either seek to become accredited or should look to other educational institutions to validate their courses. Around half the 80 responses to the review have been from institutions with associated status, or from bodies whose membership includes such institutions. The Government are still considering their response to the review in the light of the consultations.The estimate in the policy review of the number of institutions which might neither want, nor qualify for, accredited status was a matter for the review team.

Illiteracy

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science what current plans he has to combat illiteracy in adults.

Local education authorities are the main providers of basic literacy tuition for adults; central Government support is provided to the Adult Literacy and Basic Skills Unit, which acts as the central focus for adult literacy and basic skills work in England and Wales.The Department will continue to work closely with the Adult Literacy and Basic Skills Unit to promote improvements in adults' basic literacy skills. We are continuing to provide support through the education support grant programme to enable local education authorities to establish open learning centres and are encouraging the development of workplace tuition by employers. The training of tutors to teach adult literacy and related basic skills is currently a national priority area in the local education authority training grant programme. We will also continue to co-operate with the Adult Literacy and Basic Skills Unit, the BBC and the Employment Department on the basic skills accreditation initiative.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science what resources are being devoted to combat illiteracy among adults in the current financial year; and what increase is proposed for the next three years.

The Department of Education and Science and the Welsh Office support the Adult Literacy and Basic Skills Unit: the Department's grant for the current financial year is £3,030,000. The Department is also supporting expenditure of £1·7 million this year in the education support grant programme to enable local education authorities to establish open learning centres. Training in adult literacy is a national priority area under the local education authority training grants scheme and we are supporting expenditure of £700,000 this year.Local education authorities are the main providers of adult literacy and other basic skills tuition. The Adult Literacy and Basic Skills Unit estimates that local education authorities in England and Wales are spending about £26·3 million a year on adult basic education. The Employment Department funds training and enterprise councils, which provide training programmes taking account of local labour market needs, including the requirements of unemployed people with literacy difficulties. The Home Office also makes provision for those with inadequate literacy skills in prisons.The Government are not yet in a position to announce what funds will be available in the next three years for those programmes which it funds directly. The expenditure of local education authorities is for them to decide in the light of available resources.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science how many teachers are currently employed in the Government's efforts to tackle illiteracy.

Comprehensive figures are not available. Local education authorities provide annual returns to the Adult Literacy and Basic Skills Unit. These include the numbers of staff involved in teaching adult literacy and related basic skills. In November 1989, 751 full-time tutors and 8,514 part-time tutors were employed by local education authorities. In addition, there were 3,925 volunteer tutors.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he will conduct a survey to establish the extent of illiteracy in adults in the United Kingdom at the present time; and if he will make a statement.

I have no plans to conduct such a survey at present. Our best estimate, based on evidence from the national child development study survey in 1981, suggests that about 13 per cent. of adults may have some problems with literacy and numeracy. I understand that a further survey for this study is currently taking place.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science what agencies, voluntary and statutory, are involved in the Government's efforts to tackle adult illiteracy.

A number of voluntary sector providers have a substantial involvement in adult basic education, for example, the National Association for the Care and Rehabilitation of Offenders, but a comprenhensive list is not available. The main statutory agencies involved in improving adult literacy and related basic skills include the following: the Department of Education and Science and the Welsh Office which support the Adult Literacy and Basic Skills Unit; the Employment Department through its training, enterprise and education directorate; the Home Office; local education authorities; and other organisations such as the BBC and the library service.

Refugees

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he will consider making additional earmarked grants available to local education authorities for provision of English courses for refugees newly arrived in the United Kingdom.

It is open to local education authorities in England and Wales to apply for grants paid under section 210 of the Education Reform Act 1988 to meet the educational needs, including the need for English language teaching, of those who are for the time being resident in a camp or other accommodation or establishment provided for refugees or for displaced or similar persons. Provision for English language teaching for other refugees is a matter for the local education authority concerned. However, if the refugees are from the Commonwealth, local education authorities in England and Wales may apply for grant paid by the Home Office under section 11 of the Local Government Act 1966 to support the cost of English language teaching.

To ask the Secretary of Stale for Education and Science if he will consider making additional resources available to asylum seekers to meet the fees sought by British universities or colleges to which they may apply.

The Government do not regard it as appropriate to provide resources to meet the course fees of applicants for asylum, since there is no presumption that they will be allowed to remain in this country. Those granted asylum are eligible to apply for mandatory awards, or to pay fees at the home rate if they do not qualify for such an award.

Student Loans Company

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science if non-executive directors will be appointed to the board of the Student Loans Company.

The board of the Student Loans Company met on 1 November and, with the approval of the then holder of my office and my right hon. and learned Friend the Secretary of State for Scotland, appointed Mr. Ralph Kanter as non-executive director. This appointment will bring additional commercial expertise to the board of a successful and efficient company.

Attorney-General

Child Care Cases

To ask the Attorney-General what steps have been taken by the Lord Chancellor to nominate members of the judiciary to deal with child care cases in the higher courts under the Children Act 1989; and whether the location at which these hearings will take place have been determined.

The Children Act 1989 is due to be implemented on 14 October 1991. Central to the philosophy of the Act is the principle that children's cases in the higher courts should be heard by judicary who, by reason of their experience and training, are specialists in family work.

Under the Courts and Legal Services Act 1990, the Lord Chancellor will have the power to nominate such judiciary, with the concurrence of the president of the family division. The nomination process is expected to extend over a period of months, but as a first step the Lord Chancellor has, with the approval of the right honourable Sir Stephen Brown, president of the family division, named 47 circuit judges who will be known as "designated family judges". This group of judges will be based at the network of county court "care centres" and will have the primary responsibility for hearing the child care cases transferred to those centres from the magistrates courts.

Each centre will also provide the focus for a local implementation committee which will be chaired by the designated family judge and which will play a major role in developing implementation plans based on local circumstances. It is envisaged that these committees will begin their work well before October 1991.

The location of the "care centres" which were announced on 2 August have been confirmed following widespread consultation with justices' clerks, local authorities and other interest groups. The 50 locations, together with the name of the designated family judge assigned to each one, are as follows:

Location

Judge

South Eastern circuit

BrightonHis Honour Judge Hammerton
ChelmsfordHis Honour Judge Groves TD RD
GuildfordHis Honour Judge Main QC
IpswichHis Honour Judge Barnett QC
LutonHis Honour Judge Hamilton
MedwayHis Honour Judge Russell Vick QC
Milton KeynesHis Honour Judge Tyrer
NorwichHis Honour Judge Hyam
ReadingHis Honour Judge Kenny
WatfordHis Honour Judge Stockdale

Midland and Oxford circuit

BirminghamHis Honour Judge Wilson Mellor QC
CoventryHis Honour Judge Harold Wilson
DerbyHis Honour Judge Morrison
LeicesterHis Honour Judge Young
LincolnHis Honour Judge Hutchinson
NorthamptonHis Honour Judge John Wilson
NottinghamHis Honour Judge Heald
OxfordHis Honour Judge Peter Crawford QC
PeterboroughHis Honour Judge Astill
StokeHis Honour Judge Kenneth Taylor
TelfordHis Honour Judge Shand
WolverhamptonHis Honour Judge Stuart-White
WorcesterHis Honour Judge Roy Ward QC

Western circuit

BristolHer Honour Judge Counsell
TauntonHis Honour Judge Willcock QC
PlymouthHis Honour Judge Sir Jonathan Clarke
TruroHis Honour Judge Cox
BournemouthHer Honour Judge McKinney
PortsmouthHis Honour Judge Wroath

Wales and Chester circuit

CardiffHis Honour Judge Norman Francis
ChesterHis Honour Judge Roy Woolley
Caernarfon and LlangefniHis Honour Judge Eifion Roberts QC
Warrington and Rhyl(to be appointed)
SwanseaHis Honour Judge Michael Evans QC
NewportHis Honour Judge David Glyn Morgan
Merthyr TydfilHis Honour Judge Graham Jones

Northern circuit

ManchesterHis Honour Judge Lees
LiverpoolHer Honour Judge Ebsworth

Location

Judge

CarlisleHis Honour Judge Bell
BlackburnHis Honour Judge Lockett
LancasterHis Honour Judge Mahon

North Eastern circuit

HullHis Honour Judge Barker
LeedsHis Honour Judge Geoffrey Baker QC
NewcastleHis Honour Judge Paling
MiddlesbroughHis Honour Judge Peter Fox QC
SheffieldHis Honour Judge Fricker
SunderlandHis Honour Judge Carr
YorkHis Honour Judge Coles QC

The principal registry of the family division will act as the centre for child care cases in London. Mrs. Justice Bracewell, whose appointment as family division liaison judge for London was announced on 27 September, will be assigned special responsibility for this centre.

Drumcree Church Parade

To ask the Attorney-General whether any proceedings have been taken against spectators of the church parade to Drumcree parish church, County Armagh, on 8 July, in respect of their threatening, abusive and insulting language or in respect of their display of flags and posters likely to provoke a breach of the peace.

I have been asked to reply.This is a matter for the chief constable, but I understand that no arrests were made by police during the parade and no proceedings are pending.

Environment

Civil Defence

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment how many civil servants are currently employed (a) full time and (b) part time by his Department on civil defence; what the total costs of employing staff on civil defence duties were in 1989–90; what the total costs of employing staff on civil defence duties are expected to be in 1990–91; and whether he has any plans for these staff to be transferred to work on other duties.

The information requested is as follows:

Number of full-time staff employed on 16 November 1990Number of part-time staff employed on 16 November 1990Total cost 1989–90 £Estimated total cost 1990–91 £
Nil34261K230K
My right hon. and learned Friend the Home Secretary announced on 16 October that he had initiated a review of the options for the future of civil defence arrangements in the light of east-west relations. Future levels of expenditure in civil defence will depend on the outcome of that review.

Vehicle Emissions

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what assessment his Department has made of the emission standard for carbon monoxide for motor vehicles which would be necessary to achieve the environmental aims set out in his White Paper, "This Common Inheritance".

It is our assessment that the strict car exhaust emissions standards for which we are pressing within the European Community will enable us to achieve the Environmental White Paper aims for CO.

Avian Pests

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what discussions he has had with the European Commission concerning the birds directive's provisions for avian pest species.

There have been many meetings with the Commission in recent years, at both ministerial and official level, at which ways of accommodating pest control practices within the directive's protective framework for birds and their habitats have been discussed.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what proposals he intends to put to the European Community for a control scheme for avian pest species following his decision not to amend the Wildlife and Countryside Act.

Only the European Commission may submit proposals to the Council for amending Community law. In the Government's view, however, there is a case for amending the EC birds directive so that where member states can show that control of avian pest species is necessary and would not endanger the survival of those species, they may authorise appropriate measures without having to operate unnecessary bureaucratic procedures. The Commission is aware of the Government's views.

Smoke Controls

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what support will be offered by his Department to implement the extension of Clean Air Act controls to areas of dense smoke.

Local authorities which designate smoke control areas under the Clean Air Acts are eligible for Exchequer grant of 40 per cent. of the cost of adapting heating and cooking appliances to burn fuel smokelessly. Since 1979–80, grants totalling more than £15 million have been awarded to local authorities in England and Wales.

The Mall

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment why The Mall in London SW1 is closed to traffic on Sundays.

The Mall is closed on Sundays to facilitate pedestrian access to St. James's park and to improve the amenity of the area for visitors.

Government Offices (Furnishing)

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what is his assessment of the relative costs of furnishing Government offices (a) from Crown Suppliers and (b) from (i) German and (ii) other foreign suppliers.

Since 1987 Government Departments have been individually responsible for purchasing furniture wherever value for money can be obtained. The information requested is not available and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Local Government Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what is(a) the Government assistance per head in the North Devon district council area and (b) the community charge in the same area.

External support to the North Devon district council area is £470 per adult in 1990–91. External support consists of revenue support grant, receipts from the national non-domestic rate pool, receipts from the safety net and low rateable values grant. The average community charge in the area is £319.Charge payers in the North Devon area also receive additional Government assistance through community charge benefits and the transitional relief scheme.

Nature Conservancy Council

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will list the reasons he gave the Nature Conservancy Council for not providing it with additional funding to assist in the purchase of fenns and whixhall mosses.

We expect the Council to make the safeguarding of important sites a top priority when disbursing the grant in aid it receives from my Department each year. Its grant in aid was increased by almost £4 million to £44·069 million this year and should have been more than sufficient for the purchase of the fenns and whixall mosses. We do not retain funds within the Department for site acquistion.

Nuclear Waste

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will place in the Library the report commissioned by his Department to examine the feasibility of alternatives to reprocessing of nuclear waste.

I assume that the hon. Member is referring to DOE report No. DOE RW89/089 entitled "Packing, storage and direct disposal of spent AGR fuel". The report was submitted to the Department in November 1989. A copy was also sent to the national lending library in Boston Spa, where it is available to the public on request. I am arranging for a copy to be placed in the House Library.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what assessment his Department has made of the use of dry storage of nuclear waste from advanced gas-cooled reactors as an alternative to reprocessing or subterranean disposal; and if he will make a statement.

No such assessment has been made by my Department. The hon. Member is aware of the report commissioned by my Department on the feasibility of dry storage of spent fuel. Spent fuel is not nuclear waste unless it is designated for direct disposal. The storage of nuclear fuel is a matter for the nuclear industry.

County Hall (London)

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment why the bid from the County Hall Development Group for county hall was formally rescinded by the London residuary body; and what the impact on capital receipts for the London boroughs will be.

The County Hall Development Group failed to complete the purchase of county hall as required by the London residuary body. LRB notified London boroughs on 25 October that there would be no general distribution of Greater London capital receipts this year.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will make a statement about the future of county hall, London, SE1.

My Department's letter of 24 July invited the London residuary body and the County Hall Development Group to submit amendments to the planning and associated applications that were the subject of a public inquiry in the autumn of 1989. Amendments were submitted by the London residuary body on 7 November and copies sent to all parties to the public inquiry. My Department has invited comments on the proposed amendments. I will be considering whether the inquiry should be reopened.

London Residuary Body

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what the £23·1 million deposit that appears on page 16 of the London residuary body accounts for 1989–90 relates to; and what has happened to this deposit.

The sum of £23·1 million relates to the deposit on the purchase of county hall. It is now held by the London residuary body and reserved from distribution in 1990–91 in accordance with the terms of the 1990 London capital money order.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment whether he has any plans to appoint a Labour party nominee to membership of the London residuary body.

Spencer House

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what items were transferred from Kenwood to Spencer house; and what was the basis of the transfer.

A suite of furniture comprising five chairs and two sofas, which had been on loan from Spencer house to Kenwood house since 1958, was returned to the painted room at the newly restored Spencer house when it was reopened on Monday 19 November. The furniture was purchased by the Victoria and Albert museum in 1977 and remained on loan to Kenwood house until its recent removal. This is consistent with the V and A's policy of reinstating furniture and works of art to their original locations wherever possible. The furniture will continue to be available for public view.

Local Government Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what was the basis of calculation that resulted in Wandsworth receiving the highest cash payment of inner London boroughs from the London residuary body in respect of capital receipts in 1989–90 and Barnet receiving the highest cash payment of the outer London boroughs.

The distribution of capital receipts by the London residuary body is based on population. The London borough of Croydon received the largest cash payment of the outer London boroughs.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what response he has made to the recommendations in the report of the National Association of Citizens Advice Bureaux "Coping with the Community Charge".

[holding answer 22 November 1990]: Officials in my Department discussed with the National Association of Citizens Advice Bureaux the detail of the report last July. Substantial assistance has also been given to the association towards the creation of an office manual on the community charge for advice bureaux officers.

Langbaurgh District Council

To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will make a statement on his recent meeting with representatives of Langbaurgh district council.

[holding answer 22 November 1990]: I met my hon. Friend the Member for Langbaurgh (Mr. Holt) and representatives of the district council on 21 November. The delegation made a number of points about the proposals for the revenue support grant settlement which will be considered before final decisions are taken. They also raised the question of charge capping.

Overseas Development

Water Projects, India

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (1) when the water project in Orissa state will be going ahead; and if the Government will fund the training rig programme;(2) what is the current position regarding talks between the Overseas Development Administration and

(a) Save the Children, (b) UNICEF and (c) the People's Rural Education Movement in respect of the water projects in Orissa state, Uttar Pradesh, Rajastan and Gujarat, respectively.

We have submitted to the Government of India a detailed proposal for a mission to formulate an integrated rural water supply project in southern Orissa, to tackle engineering, health and social issues jointly. The organisations to be involved in the project, which may include those referred to by the hon. Lady, will depend on the mission's findings.

We have confirmed to UNICEF in writing our interest in funding British rigs for certain villages, in a number of Indian states, as part of its next five-year programme. We have discussions with it next week. The need for a training rig programme will depend on UNICEF's response.

Health

Mentally Ill People

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans his Department has to extend the grant made available to care for the mentally ill, to cover mentally handicapped people in general.

The specific mental illness grant was introduced because, in comparison with other client groups, local authorities had not been able to give sufficient priority to the mentally ill. In contrast, local authority expenditure on services for mentally handicapped people has been rising steadily in real terms over a sustained period, increasing by 72 per cent. between 1979–80 and 1988–89 to £358 million.

Disabled People

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what representations he has received on local authorities being empowered to make payments directly to disabled people to make their own care arrangements.

There have been a number of representations on the subject.

Snapethorpe Hospital, Wakefield

To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will ensure that any moneys accruing to Yorkshire regional health authority from the proposed sale of Snapethorpe hospital, Wakefield, are made available to Wakefield district health authority.

To encourage district health authorities to identify surplus property it is our policy that district health authorities should benefit from the proceeds of sales. Regional health authorities are instructed, therefore, to pass a significant proportion of sale proceeds to the district health authority which initiates the sale. Regarding the proposed sale of Snapethorpe I suggest the hon. Member contacts the regional health authority chairman, Sir Bryan Askew.

Northern Ireland

Teacher Training

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland whether teacher training colleges have any latitude in interpreting the recommendations of the committee for course accreditation for teacher education.

In order to be approved by the Department of Education, courses of initial teacher training in Northern Ireland must meet criteria laid down by the Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education.Some of these criteria prescribe specific requirements which must be met; but others are not so prescriptive, seeking rather to establish a framework within which courses should be organised. Thus under the criteria relating to the selection and admission of students to postgraduate courses, it is for the institution to determine how appropriate the content of the entrant's initial degree is to the primary or secondary curriculum.The colleges in Northern Ireland have exactly the same degree of latitude in this respect as their counterparts in England and Wales.

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will publish a list of those colleges whose graduates' training and qualifications are (a) likely to be acceptable and (b) unlikely to be acceptable for course accreditation for teacher education and entry to a recognised teacher training course.

This information is not available in the form requested. However, I can reassure the hon. Gentleman that all courses provided by Northern Ireland's two colleges of education meet the criteria laid down by the Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education.

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland whether any discussions have been held between the Department of Education (Northern Ireland) and education and library boards in relation to retraining for teachers or training for alternative careers for teachers experiencing difficulty coping with education reforms and curriculum changes; and if he will make a statement.

The Department of Education for Northern Ireland regularly discusses all aspects of the in-service training of teachers with the area boards. These have embarked on major training programmes in fulfilment of their statutory responsibility to ensure that all teachers in grant-aided schools in their areas have the necessary skills to implement the various aspects of education reform, including the common curriculum.To assist the boards to implement such a programme, substantial additional resources, both money and additional staff training time have been made available to each board.I am very pleased with the way in which Northern Ireland's teachers are responding to these changes.

House Of Commons

Late Sittings

To ask the Lord President of the Council how much it cost to keep the House of Commons open after midnight in Sessions 1988–89 and 1989–90.

Broadcasting Of Parliament

To ask the Lord President of the Council if he will list the statutory provisions that apply to the broadcasting of the proceedings of Parliament.

The broadcasting of the House's proceedings is carried out under the authority of the resolutions of the House of 26 July 1977 (sound broadcasting) and 19 July 1990 (televising). In the latter case, a further resolution will be required to provide authority for the continued televising of the House's proceedings after 1 October 1991 on the basis of permanent arrangements to be recommended to the House in due course by the Select Committee on Broadcasting.The only statutory provisions which directly relate to the broadcasting of the House's proceedings are those contained in the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988. Section 165(4)(b) of the Act provides that

"any sound recording, film, live broadcast or live cable programme of the proceedings"

of either House is protected by copyright. Section 167 states that the functions of the House of Commons as owner of copyright are to be performed by Mr. Speaker. In exercise of these powers in relation to the broadcasting of proceedings, Mr. Speaker has granted a licence to House of Commons Broadcasting Unit Ltd., a company formed by the BBC and independent television, for the purposes of producing and distributing the signal.

As for the inclusion within programmes of extracts from, or live transmissions of, parliamentary proceedings, the broadcasters are, of course, subject to the same legal obligations and standards in such areas as political balance as apply under the various Broadcasting Acts to all their other activities. Responsibility for the operation and administration of the relevant legislation lies, in the first instance, with my right hon. and learned Friend the Home Secretary.

Transport

Footbridges

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will indicate the approximate range of costs of footbridges with sloping ramps suitable for installation over six-lane trunk roads.

Typical construction costs for such a footbridge are currently estimated at between £200,000 and £350,000. The total cost could be higher depending on factors such as location, land and foundation costs, and the angle to the carriageway.

Public Service Vehicles

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what plans he has to monitor the operation of the Public Service Vehicles (Conduct of Drivers, Inspectors, Conductors and Passengers) Regulations 1990.

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many prosecutions have been brought under the Public Service Vehicles (Conduct of Drivers, Inspectors, Conductors and Passengers) Regulations 1990: and of those prosecutions, how many were in respect of clause 4.

This information is not held centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what information he has on the number of complaints that have been made by members of the public to the police in respect of clause 4 of the Public Service Vehicles (Conduct of Drivers, Inspectors, Conductors and Passengers) Regulations 1990; and if he will undertake a review to assess the effectiveness of the enforcement of the above clause.

Information on such complaints is not held centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost. We have no plans to review the enforcement of the regulations.

Midland Main Line

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will make a statement about British Rail's longer-term plans for the midland main line.

The midland main line is, and will continue to be, an important line for british Rail. Over £150 million at cash prices has been invested in the line since 1979, £40 million on rolling stock and the rest on signalling, infrastructure and improvements to passenger facilities. British Rail's investment will continue and it will also be developing plans and taking key decisions over the next two to three years about the longer-term future of the line. These plans will assess the options available when the existing high-speed trains are ready for renewal. I can assure my hon. Friend that electrification of the line will be an option.

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether he will ask British Rail to undertake further investment to cut travelling time on the midland main line from London to Leicester.

I understand that InterCity is considering spending a further £5 to £10 million on the infrastructure of the midland main line in the mid-1990s to improve journey times. Depending on the availability of finance it might be possible for British Rail to advance some, but not all, of this investment.

East London River Crossing

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what representations he has received from the European Commission about the environmental impact of the east London river crossing on Oxleas woods.

I have not received any representation from the European Commission on this subject.

Toll Roads

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) why his Department did not allow the Staffordshire forum of district councils to make a presentation on the proposed toll road;(2) if he will name each of the six companies which are currently bidding to win the contract from his Department in respect of the toll road alternative to the Birmingham-Manchester M6;(3) if he will place in the Library alternative proposed routes for the proposed toll road alternative to the M6.

In April this year, we invited outline proposals from the private sector for new privately funded road capacity between Birmingham and Manchester. The following four groups responded:

  • Balfour Beatty
  • Tarmac
  • Trafalgar House/Italstat
  • Western Parkway Consortium: led by Manufacturers Hanover and Cofiroute.
In addition, the following two groups expressed an interest in participating in the project:

  • W. S. Atkins Consultants,
  • Mitsubishi Bank.

The proposals that we have received are being carefully evaluated and, at this stage, remain commercially confidential. The Department is currently discussing various aspects of the proposals with the respondents. It is still too early to give details of any of these proposals as it is not certain yet which—if any—would be acceptable to the Government. When we are clear about a favoured proposal, consultations will take place with all interested parties—including the Staffordshire forum of district councils—in the normal way.

M6

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will estimate the volume of traffic currently using the M6 motorway and for each of the next five years until 2030.

On some weekdays, 24-hour flows exceeding 100,000 vehicles have been recorded between junctions 11 and 16. A detailed breakdown of M6 traffic flow figures is given in "Information for Prospective Bidders" for the Birmingham-Manchester road competition. A copy is in the House Library. The "1989 National Road Traffic Forecasts" forecasts traffic demand to grow between 83 and 143 per cent. by the year 2025.Local influences may mean that traffic demand could differ from the national road traffic forecasts.

National Finance

Corporation Tax

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will break down the 1989 figure of corporation tax paid by industrial and provident societies given in his answer of 23 October, Official Report, column 107, in the eight classes of such societies listed by the Registrar of Friendly Societies in his annual report.

Building societies account for the great bulk of the total, but the full breakdown requested could be prepared only at disproportionate cost.

Economic And Finance Council

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will make a statement on the outcome of the latest meeting of the European Community's Economic and Finance Council.

The ECOFIN Council met in Brussels on 19 November. The Minister of State for Corporate Affairs and I represented the United Kingdom. Further progress was made in discussions on the investment services directive. The arrangements for VAT controls after 1992 were also discussed and I explained the importance to the United Kingdom of further consultations with industry. I also stressed the importance of setting thresholds so as to minimise the impact of VAT requirements on small businesses. The presidency gave a brief report on progress in developing a system for controlling movements within the Community of goods subject to excise duties. Discussion of travellers' allowances for duty-paid goods was postponed.The Council discussed a report from the presidency on negotiations with the European Parliament about revisions to the financial perspective of the Community budget arising from German unification and the Gulf crisis.The Commission reported on the Community's offer in the financial services negotiations in the Uruguay round. This offer received general support.

Capital Asset Information Systems

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will make a statement on the development of proposals for improved capital asset information systems in Government.

An interdepartmental working group has now completed a study into these systems and has made recommendations. The report of the group has now been published and copies have been placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

Controlled Drugs

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will make a statement as to the way in which Her Majesty's Customs and Excise assesses the street value of controlled drugs for the purpose of preparing evidence of value for courts.

When called upon to provide a street value of controlled drugs Her Majesty's Customs and Excise use the national average street price as calculated by the national drugs intelligence unit from information provided by the police.

Privatisations

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to his answer to the hon. Member for Holborn and St. Pancras of 13 November, Official Report, column 112, (1) if he will publish the list of appointments various companies have held in advising on past privatisations;(2) whether the performance of any adviser on privatisation has been such as to cause them to warn Departments before considering them for a further privatisation.

[holding answers 22 November 1990]: I have placed a copy of the list the hon. Member requested in the Library. Obviously, past performance is one of the factors taken into account in considering an adviser for a further appointment.

Defence

Chemical Weapons

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what is his policy as to the most appropriate response to a chemical weapon attack by Iraq;(2) what is his policy as to the most appropriate response to the use of chemical weapons by Iraq.

The Government would take the gravest view of any Iraqi attack using chemical weapons. I am not prepared to indicate in advance what our response to such an attack might be.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) if the Government will invest further resources in chemical weapons research following the developments in the Gulf;

(2) if the Government will invest further resources in biological weapons research following the developments in the Gulf.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer that my predecessor the hon. Member for Romford (Mr. Neubert), gave to her questions on 8 February 1990, Official Report, columns 775–76.

Porton Down

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what were the funds allocated to Porton Down chemical weapons research establishment in 1990; and what will be the level of funding in 1991.

The budget of the chemical defence establishment, Porton Down for the financial year 1990–91 is some £24 million. Budgets for 1991–92 will be determined in due course.

Signal Tower, Brizlee Wood

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether it is planned to demolish the existing signal tower and dishes at Brizlee wood, Northumberland.

No. The station is expected to remain operational for the foreseeable future.

Service Personnel (Insurance)

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what discussions have been held with the insurance industry in order to ensure appropriate mechanisms to ensure that service personnel are not disadvantaged in the housing market or in respect of life insurance and to ensure that they are compensated for any extra financial burden; and if he will make a statement.

The Department keeps in close touch with the insurance industry through the Association of British Insurers and through insurance brokers with traditional links with the services.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what representations he has received regarding incidents where members of the armed services, including individuals neither under orders nor on standby, have been asked to pay a surcharge or otherwise disadvantaged before being accepted for life insurance cover, due to the Gulf crisis.

I understand that one letter has been received by my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what steps he will take to ensure that members of the armed services who are charged a surcharge in respect of life insurance due to the Gulf crisis, even when neither under orders nor on standby, are compensated for such additional costs.

It is not yet clear whether such steps are necessary, but we are keeping the matter under review.

Employment

Demographic Changes

To ask the Secretary of State for Employment (1) if he will list the members of the interdepartmental working group set up to consider ways of alleviating the effects of forecast demographic change to the work force in the 1990s;(2) if he will publish the recommendations made by the working group set up to consider ways of alleviating the effects of the forecast demographic change to the work force in the 1990s.

An ad-hoc interdepartmental working group of officials was set up in 1987 to consider the implications of the decline in the number of young people entering the labour market. The working group consisted of officials from the Department of Employment, which chaired the group, the Department of Education and Science, the Manpower Services Commission, the Department of Health and Social Security, the Manpower and Personnel Office and the Ministry of Defence.The working group's findings were summarised in an article entitled "New Entrants to the Labour Market in the 1990s", which was published in the May 1988 edition of

Employment Gazette, and in chapter 1 of the Government White Paper "Employment for the 1990s" (Cm 540).

Labour Statistics

To ask the Secretary of State for Employment how many were employed in the (a) agricultural industry, (b) coal mining industry, (c) shipbuilding and ship repair industries and (d) steel industry as at June 1990.

Information is given is the table.

Employees in employment industries (SIC 1980): Great Britain
Thousands June 1990
Agriculture and horticulture (Class 01)260·2
Coal extraction and solid fuels (Group 111)85·5
Iron and steel (Group 221)25·3
Shipbuilding and ship repairing (Group 361)41·2

To ask the Secretary of State for Employment if he will publish a table showing the numbers and rate of unemployment in Great Britain and the United Kingdom using (a) the International Labour Office definition and (b) the claimant count in each year since 1974.

[holding answer 20 November 1990]: The information requested is contained in the following table. Levels of unemployment based on the International Labour Office definition are not available before 1984.

Standardised unemployment rates in selected OECD countries
Annual Data
1974197519761977197819791980198119821983198419851986198719881989
Canada5·36·97·18·08·37·47·47·510·911·811·210·49·58·87·77·5
United States5·58·37·66·96·05·87·07·59·59·57·47·16·96·15·45·2
Japan1·41·92·02·02·22·12·02·22·42·62·72·62·82·82·52·3
Australia2·64·84·75·626·26·26·05·77·19·98·98·28·08·07·26·1
New Zealand13·94·05·67·1
Belgium33·05·06·47·47·98·28·810·812·612·112·111·311·211·09·78·1
Finland1·72·23·85·87·25·94·64·85·35·45·25·05·35·04·53·4
France2·84·04·44·95·25·96·37·48·18·39·710·210·410·510·09·6
Germany (Federal Republic)21·623·623·723·623·523·23·04·46·18·07·17·26·46·26·15·5

Thousands

1

Total claimant count (annual average unemployment) (seasonally adjusted)

Total ILO unemployed2 (spring each year)

Year

Level

Rate

Level

Rate

United Kingdom

1974518·32·0
1975796·23·1
19761,091·34·2
19771,160·84·4
19781,144·04·3
19791,074·34·0
19801,364·45·1
19812,172·28·1
19822,544·99·5
19832,788·010·5
19842,916·310·73,206·011·8
19853,027·910·93,074011·2
19863,097·911·13,073·011·2
19872,806·510·02,979·010·7
19882,274·98·12,469·08·8

31989

1,784·46·32,063·07·2

Great Britain

1974492·52·0
1975761·63·0
19761,046·24··
19771,111·54·3
19781,091·04·2
19791,021·43·9
19801,301·15·0
19812,086·38·0
19822,447·89·4
19832,681·310·3
19842,806·110·63,094·011·7
19852,915·210·82,968·011·1
19862,975·311·02,969·011·1
19872,684·49·82,879·010·6
19882,161·77·82,376·68·7

31989

1,678·86·01,978·07·1

1 The seasonally adjusted series has been revised in November 1990 to allow for the changes in conditions of the Redundant Mineworkers Payment Scheme, effective from July 1989. The seasonally adjusted series takes into account changes in the unemployment count consistent with the current definition of unemployment to make assessment of trends over time possible.

2 ILO definition levels of unemployment for United Kingdom and Great Britain only available from 1984.

3 Preliminary estimates only 1989.

To ask the Secretary of State for Employment if he will publish a table showing the rates of unemployment in each country in the OECD using the International Labour Office definition in each year since 1974.

Following is the information for all the OECD countries for which standardised unemployment rates are available. The table is taken from the OECD publication "Quarterly Labour Force Statistics". OECD figures provide the nearest comparable data to the ILO definition.

1974

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

1980

1981

1982

1983

1984

1985

1986

1987

1988

1989

Ireland13·715·416·817·116·916·3

215·7

Italy5·35·86·67·07·17·67·57·88·48·89·49·610·510·911·010·9
Netherlands

22·7

5·25·55·35·35·46·08·511·412·011·810·69·99·69·28·3
Norway1·52·31·71·41·82·01·62·02·63·43·12·62·02·13·24·9
Portugal7·98·48·58·57·05·75·0
Spain2·63·64·65·26·98·511·213·915·817·220·021·421·020·119·116·9
Sweden2·01·61·61·82·22·12·02·53·23·53·12·82·71·91·61·4
United Kingdom2·94·35·6

26·0

25·9

25·0

26·4

29·8

2ll·3

212·4

11·711·211·210·38·5

26·9

OECD Total

23·5

5·25·3

25·3

25·2

25·1

5·86·7

28·1

8·68·07·87·77·36·7

26·2

1 The data are not seasonally adjusted.

2 Secretariat estimates (or preliminary-figures).

3 Revised series.

Social Security

Refugees

To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security if he will conduct a review of the social security provisions which are currently applied to refugees newly arrived in the United Kingdom; and if he will make a statement.

To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security if he will increase the resources made available to publicise the availability of social security assistance available to refugees newly arrived in the United Kingdom.

We have no plans to do so. Adequate information is already available to newly arrived refugees and their advisers. All those refugees who do not already have contacts in the United Kingdom can turn for advice to the numerous refugee agencies, many of which receive Government funding.

To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security what savings are made to the social security budget by reducing income support available to asylum seekers.

None. The income support budget takes into account the provision for asylum seekers allowed under the rules.

To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security if he will issue new guidelines to his Department's local offices authorising the award of social fund grants to bona fide refugees newly arrived in the United Kingdom.

No. There is already guidance to local offices on social fund provision for refugees. They can apply for a crisis loan when they first arrive in the United Kingdom. If they receive income support they can apply for a community care grant. In both cases the social fund officer will consider the full circumstances of their claim before making a decision.

To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security (1) if he will make the full income support rate of payment available to asylum seekers newly arrived in the United Kingdom;(2) if he will increae the rates of income support presently offered to asylum seekers under the age of 25 years.

There are no plans at present for changes in the relevant income support rules.

Residential Homes

To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security if Price Waterhouse was asked to evaluate the quality of care offered when undertaking its recent survey into residential and nursing homes.

The objective of the survey was to identify the range of costs of caring for people with different types and levels of dependency in homes of varying size and staff-resident ratios in different parts of Great Britain. All the homes in the survey would be subject to registration and inspection by the relevant statutory authority to ensure appropriate standards under legislation made by my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Health.

Wales

Welsh Language

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales if he will announce the results of his consultation about exemptions from Welsh in the national curriculum.

I have carefully considered the views of the Curriculum Council for Wales, local education authorities and others on the issues set out in the consultation document published by my predecessor on 28 February.There was general approval for the proposal to waive the provision that schools not yet teaching Welsh should teach it for a "reasonable time" until the national curriculum requirements come into effect. I laid regulations to implement this on 12 November.There was also widespread though not unanimous approval for the proposal to exempt from the national curriculum requirement for Welsh pupils from outside Wales who enter a school in Wales for the first time in the final year of key stage 3 or during key stage 4. I shall therefore be issuing for consultation draft regulations to implement this exemption for such pupils provided they have not studied Welsh in the school curriculum for at least one academic year in any of the preceding three academic years.The consultation document indicated a preparedness to consider proposals from LEAs for an extension of up to a further two years of the period for phasing in Welsh, where this was necessary and formed part of an LEA plan for the full introduction of Welsh in the national curriculum.

Clwyd, Gwynedd, Mid Glamorgan and West Glamorgan LEAs have not sought any extension and I propose to accept that.

Gwent LEA, which starts from a position of very limited provision in its schools, put forward a detailed plan for implementation which would require some exemptions for up to two years. I welcome the positive approach the authority has taken and I am making proposals in line with its implementation plan.

Powys and South Glamorgan LEAs also put forward implementation plans which I accept and which provide for deferment in some schools for up to two years.

Dyfed LEA has not sought any exemptions in general, but drew attention to the secondary schools of South Pembrokeshire with which it had agreed a proposal to extend the implementation of key stage 3 so that it would be taught to the end of key stage 3 by 1997. I accept this proposal.

I am now proceeding to consultation on proposals to implement the necessary limited period exemptions.

Dyfed LEA also takes the view that it would not be appropriate in the secondary schools in south Pembrokeshire to implement the national curriculum requirement for Welsh in key stage 4 at present. In view of the LEA's policy and of the distinctive historical and linguistic character of the south Pembrokeshire area, I shall be consulting interested bodies on a proposal to exempt the south Pembrokeshire secondary schools from Welsh at key stage 4. However, I do not think it would be right for any pupil in Wales to be deprived of the chance to choose to study Welsh in key stage 4. I would therefore propose that the exempted schools should make arrangements for Welsh to be an option for those pupils who choose it. Subject to that, I would propose to exempt the following schools from Welsh at key stage 4:

  • Greenhill School, Tenby
  • Milford Haven Comprehensive School
  • Pembroke School
  • Sir Thomas Picton School, Haverfordwest
  • Tasker-Millward VC Comprehensive School, Haverfordwest

The consultation exercise addressed the issue of flows of pupils across the border with England. Neither the CCW nor any LEA considered it sensible to make exemption regulations which would single out children who live in England but who are in classes in schools in Wales. I do not propose to do so. Nevertheless there are schools which take in numbers of pupils from England. Some schools with catchment areas or potential catchment areas which cross the English border have expressed concerns about possible losses of pupils if they were required to study Welsh, particularly at key stage 4. I therefore propose to respond to those concerns by consulting on proposals to exempt the following schools from the national curriculum requirements for Welsh at key stage 4. I propose that the exempted schools should make arrangements for Welsh to be available as an option at key stage 4 for those pupils who choose it:

Clwyd

  • Darland High School
  • Hawarden High School
  • The Maelor School, Wrexham
  • St. Richard Gwynn High School, Flint
  • St. David's High School, Saltney
  • St. Joseph's High School, Wrexhyam

Gwent

  • Monmouth Comprehensive School

Patient Care, Dyfed

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what initiatives are being taken to promote a better quality of care for patients in Dyfed, Wales; and if he will make a statement.

The quality strategy "A Quality Health Service for Wales", published in April 1990, is not intended to be prescriptive but to provide a framework within which individual health authorities can develop their own quality programmes in the context of their own strategic intent. Health authorities are required to consider how best they could progress quality within their own areas, using the strategy as a working framework.Within the context of the Department's annual review East Dyfed health authority has confirmed its commitment to the development of total quality management (TQM) and the pursuance of quality care as a key task for the health authority within the district's overall philosophy of being consumer responsive. The authority is also developing explicit statements on quality standards for the contracting process. Detailed information on initiatives in East Dyfed is, however, a matter for the authority.

Welsh Speakers, Ceredigion

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales how many Welsh speakers there are in Ceredigion; what were the corresponding figures for 1960, 1970 and 1980; and if he will make a statement.

The most recent data available are from the 1981 census. Information on Welsh speakers in earlier years is also related to the dates of the census. The number of people aged three and over who were recorded as speaking Welsh in the 1961, 1971 and 1981 censuses was as follows:

Enumerated population speaking Welsh1
1961238,500
1971235,800
198135,200
1 The enumerated population consists of persons present at midnight on census night whether or not they were usually resident there.
2 Cardiganshire.

Farmers' Unions

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales (1) when he last met the National Farmers Union; what representations it made to him; and if he will make a statement;(2) when he last met the Farmers Union of Wales; what representations it made to him; and if he will make a statement.

My right hon. Friend had a joint meeting with representatives of the National Farmers Union and the Farmers Union of Wales on 25 October 1990 to discuss the state of the agriculture industry in Wales.

Sheepmeat Producers

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what action he has taken to assist sheepmeat producers.

We were able to bring forward the timing of the two advance payments of sheep annual premium. Most, if not all, producers in Wales will, by now, have received the first payment of £2·40 per eligible ewe and will shortly receive the second instalment of £2·45 per head. This represents a cash flow benefit of some £25 million for producers in Wales. In addition, sheepmeat producers in the LFA can look forward to a 4 ecu per head (currently about £3·12) supplement to the sheep annual premium for 1991 as a result of this year's price-fixing agreement. The benefits of the green pound devaluation negotiated at the price fixing will also accrue from the beginning of the 1991 marketing year.

Hill Farmers

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what policy initiatives he proproses to safeguard and to enhance the incomes of hill farmers; and if he will make a statement.

Farmers in our less-favoured areas benefit directly from a number of special measures that are already in place, including the hill livestock compensatory allowances, enhanced rates of capital grants and for 1991 the maximum permitted payment under EC rules of the suckler cow premium. For the future we shall continue to seek to ensure that hill farmers in Wales are able to compete effectively and on equal terms with the rest of Europe.

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what representations he has received from hill farmers; and if he will make a statement.

During his recent visits to a number of hill farms my right hon. Friend discussed with farmers a wide range of issues affecting the agricultural industry in the less-favoured areas of Wales.

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales how many times he has visited European Community institutions on the continent to discuss upland farmers in Wales; and if he will make a statement.

In line with long-established practice, my right hon. Friend the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food takes the lead in European Community discussions and negotiations. We are in regular contact with him and we know that he is fully apprised of the needs of the upland farmers in Wales.

Scotland

Second Homes

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will give the number of registered second homes by district council area as at (a) 1 April 1980, (b) 1 April 1988 and (c) 1 April 1990.

Information is held centrally only on the estimated numbers of second and holiday homes in each district council area at 30 June 1988. These are given in the table. Comparable figures for 1980 and 1990 are not available.

Estimated number of second and holiday homes, 30 June 1988 Scotland
AreaNumber
Scotland28,308
Borders
Berwickshire295
Ettrick and Lauderdale321
Roxburgh497
Tweeddale258
Central
Clackmannan39
Falkirk216
Stirling287
Dumfries and Galloway
Annandale and Eskdale317
Nithsdale379
Stewartry704
Wigtown575
Fife
Dunfermline120
Kirkcaldy210
North East Fife925
Grampian
Aberdeen567
Banff and Buchan599
Gordon489
Kincardine and Deeside639
Moray735
Highland
Badenoch and Strathspey946
Caithness260
Inverness679
Lochaber700
Nairn110
Ross and Cromarty1,180
Skye and Lochalsh715
Sutherland670
Lothian
East Lothian697
Edinburgh1,034
Midlothian55
West Lothian75
Strathclyde
Argyll and Bute3,809
Bearsden and Milngavie6
Clydebank43
Clydesdale188
Cumbernauld and Kilsyth41
Cumnock and Doon Valley78
Cunninghame2,492
Dumbarton441
EAst Kilbride57
Eastwood26
Glasgow1,071
Hamilton70
Inverclyde112
Kilmarnock and Loudoun86
Kyle and Carrick677
Monklands82
Motherwell33
Renfrew181
Strathkelvin48
Tayside
Angus679
Dundee296
Perth and Kinross1,543
Islands Council
Orkney Islands202
Shetland Islands244
Western Isles510

Local Government Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how many people in each local authority area in Scotland have received a payment under the community charge special payments scheme; and what is the total sum paid out by each authority.

No local authority has yet provided details of the numbers of people receiving special payments in its area or of the amounts involved.

Sand Eel Catches

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what were the numbers of 0-group, 1-group and older fish in the sand eel catches in International Council for the Exploration of the Seas division VIa in each of the last five years.

The estimated numbers are as follows:

Thousands
0-Group1-Group2 Group and older
19853,260,010152,0921,240,938
19863,065,6601,845,060873,010
1987700,0701,196,780518,460
1988967,187258,8552,352,518
1989444,595225,5641,284,771

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what was (a) the size of the sand eel catches in International Council for the Exploration of the Seas division VIa in 1990, (b) the amount of fishing effort directed towards sand eel fishing and (c) the home ports of vessels concerned.

The information requested is as follows:

  • (a) The sand eel catch in International Council for the Exploration of the Seas area VIa in 1990 up to and including October was 16,515 tonnes.
  • (b) 2,065 hours' fishing.
  • The data available are up to and including October 1990 and are therefore subject to revision.

  • (c) Eleven vessels have recorded sand eel catches from area VIa to date. The districts of the vessels concerned are:
  • Number

    Fraserburgh3
    Stornoway2
    Aberdeen1
    Ayr1
    MacDuff1
    Mallaig1
    Orkney1
    Shetland1

    Child Care, Fife

    To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland if anyone involved in the inquiry into child care policy in Fife region has been given immunity from prosecution by the Crown Office; and if he will make a statement.

    [holding answer 12 November 1990]: I am advised that one witness was granted limited immunity in respect of one incident not involving children.

    Home Department

    Prisoners (Medical Care)

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what are the normal arrangements for providing medical care for prisoners who are seriously ill; and under what circumstances treatment is normally arranged outside prison.

    The medical officer of a prison is statutorily responsible for the health care of its prisoners and has clinical discretion to make whatever arrangements are deemed appropriate to meet the health needs of those who become ill. In general the medical officer will arrange for treatment to be received outside when the treatment required is such that it cannot be provided by a prison service hospital or medical centre.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what form of transport is normally used to convey a prisoner when medical treatment is thought to be necessary outside a prison; and what security arrangements are made.

    Such matters are determined at the time according to the circumstances of the particular case, including the security classification of the prisoner.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many prisoners in the last 12 months have been permitted to receive medical care outside prison; and what are the criteria for deciding if private medical care is appropriate in a particular case.

    In the 12 months ended 31 March 1990 prisoners attended out-patient departments of NHS hospitals on 18,740 occasions. During the same period there were 1,988 temporary removals of prisoners to NHS hospitals for in-patient observation or treatment. The number of prisoners involved is not recorded. More recent information is not available centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.Instances of prisoners being allowed to receive private medical treatment outside prison are not statistically recorded. A prisoner may receive in-patient treatment privately only in exceptional circumstances. The medical officer must be satisfied that the treatment should be carried out during the period in which the prisoner is likely to be in custody; that it cannot be provided in a prison service hospital; and that either the prisoner should be treated significantly earlier privately than under NHS arrangements or the prisoner had received an appointment for private in-patient treatment before coming into prison. Prisoners are not normally allowed to receive out-patient treatment on a private basis, but individual cases are considered on their merits.

    Freemasons

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will hold an inquiry into the operation of freemasonry within the Prison Department and the prison system.

    We have no plans to do so, but if the hon. Member has any specific cause for concern, perhaps he could let me know.

    Mr Paul Malone

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when he is going to reply to the letter from the hon. Member for Liverpool, Broadgreen regarding the findings of the two-year inquiry into the matter of the incarceration of Paul Malone.

    Controlled Drugs

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many (a) male and (b) female prisoners were serving prison sentences on 1 September for offences of importing controlled drugs;(2) if he will enumerate by nationalities the prisoners serving sentences on 1 September for offences of importing controlled drugs, and the prisons in which they are serving their sentences.

    The only readily available information on the types of drugs offence does not separately distinguish females or nationality; it is published annually in "Prison Statistics England and Wales" (table 1(a) of the latest volume, for 1989, Cm. 1221), copies of which are in the Library.

    Prisons (Education)

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many GCSE examinations were sat by prisoners in Her Majesty's prisons in the last academic year; if the national curriculum is to be applied to education in prisons; and if he will make a statement.

    A total of 666 GCSE examinations were sat by prisoners in 1989–90. Prison service establishments will, as far as possible, apply the national curriculum.

    Forensic Scientists

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make a statement on the numbers of forensic scientists available for police work.

    There are currently 588 staff in post in the forensic science service of whom 527 are scientific and technical staff who, directly or indirectly, provide scientific support to the police.

    Mr Charles Mcghee

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will refer for review by the Court of Appeal the case of Charles McGhee, who was convicted and sentenced on 17 May 1989; and if he will make a statement.

    Representations from Mr. McGhee which have been submitted on his behalf are being considered to decide whether there are any grounds to justify our intervention.

    Remand

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he intends to increase the number of remand places available for female defendants remanded into custody from Welsh courts.

    Female prisoners committed into custody by courts in north Wales are at present received at Risley remand centre and those committed by courts in south Wales are received at Pucklechurch. The provision of remand places for female prisoners at these establishments is kept under constant review and there are currently plans to create a further 60 places for females at Risley by the mid-1990s.

    Deportation Orders

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many deportation orders he has signed in the last 10 years.

    The numbers of deportation orders made in each year since 1980 are published in table 18 of the annual Home Office Command Paper "Control of Immigration Statistics, United Kingdom, 1989" (Cm.1124), a copy of which is in the Library.

    Immigration

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what was the backlog of immigration cases in each category for October.

    The number of outstanding cases relates to casework in B1 division in the immigration and nationality department and is as follows:

    Outstanding Cases—October
    Number
    General Immigration Casework1220,910
    Asylum and Related Casework1329,936
    1 Does not include applications received in the Department but which await allocation to caseworkers.
    2 Includes referred entry clearance applications, and enquiries submitted by letter, as well as variation of leave cases. Includes both general and Eastern European casework (the latter was absorbed into general casework in July 1990).
    3 These figures are a total of all work outstanding in the Refugee Unit.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many times the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State has visited (a) Lunar house and (b) the Liverpool passport office.

    I have paid three visits to Lunar house and one to Liverpool passport office since November 1989.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many passports are held at (a) Lunar house and (b) the Liverpool passport office.

    I regret that the information requested is not available and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

    Refugees

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he will take steps to amend existing regulations to allow newly arrived refugees who have children to apply for family reunion as of the date of their arrival in the United Kingdom.

    Once a person is recognised as a refugee, his or her spouse and minor children may be admitted to the United Kingdom immediately.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he will amend the employment regulations to allow newly arrived asylum seekers to qualify for work permits as soon as they arrive in the United Kingdom.

    We have no present plans to change our practice in allowing asylum seekers to work. The issue will be considered in the current review of asylum arrangements.

    Visitors

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list the number of visitors to the United Kingdom admitted in each quarter in 1988 and 1989, showing the numbers by country of embarkation.

    [holding answer 14 November 1990]: The available information is by nationality and is given in the tables.

    Table 1
    Ordinary and business visitors admitted to the United Kingdom by nationality, 1988
    Total visitor admissions in 1988
    Geographical region/Nationality1st quarter2nd quarter3rd quarter4th quarter
    Western Europe (excluding EC)
    Austria21,50024,80046,50021,900
    Cyprus5,3506,7309,6007,710
    Finland19,80028,90029,20024,600
    Malta6,8605,7509,9807,770
    Norway49,80059,40065,10059,800
    Sweden80,700113,000117,000104,000
    Switzerland43,40062,40077,70063,800
    Turkey9,74010,30013,30011,500
    Yugoslavia6,0007,76010,8008,200
    Western Europe (excluding EC)243,000319,000379,000309,000
    Eastern Europe
    Bulgaria4509501,310890
    Czechoslovakia2,4804,7705,9003,710
    GDR9001,5101,6701,160
    Hungary2,7804,9207,4203,730
    Poland5,6009,48016,7007,470
    Romania650730940700
    USSR1,0901,8602,5802,310
    Eastern Europe14,00024,20036,50020,000
    Europe (excluding EC)257,000343,000416,000329,000
    Americas
    Argentina2,7103,3904,0002,330
    Barbados4101,2003,050820
    Brazil9,96013,30022,00012,000
    Canada51,800111,000150,00073,800
    Chile1,3402,0602,2401,360
    Colombia1,5703,5004,0902,360
    Cuba8017012090
    Guyana3806401,540710
    Jamaica1,7903,7106,8202,860
    Mexico2,5205,74016,2005,130
    Peru1,1901,6201,8201,150
    Trinidad and Tobago1,2601,9904,6901,860
    United States of America294,000530,000676,000424,000
    Uruguay6801,3201,170620
    Venezuela1,0801,5503,0001,660
    Americas371,000681,000897,000531,000
    Total visitor admissions in 1988
    Geographical region/Nationality1st quarter2nd quarter3rd quarter4th quarter
    Africa
    Algeria2,7902,8005,4502,740
    Egypt4,9106,25011,3005,800
    Ethiopia5307101,060750
    Ghana3,6404,5807,8804,700
    Kenya2,9505,1308,2504,600
    Libya470660930480
    Mauritius1,7503,1805,2802,200
    Morocco2,0002,5804,5503,360
    Nigeria17,20017,60025,50019,800
    Sierra Leone9809602,3201,260
    Somalia170230320200
    South Africa13,00022,90029,80019,400
    Sudan1,4203,9003,5901,850
    Tanzania1,3602,2003,0601,680
    Tunisia1,3501,3401,5501,400
    Uganda9601,6202,0901,200
    Zambia1,4502,0102,1102,550
    Zimbabwe3,1104,8605,9004,480
    Africa60,00083,500121,00078,400
    Asia
    Indian sub-continent
    Bangladesh1,6703,0403,8602,400
    India19,20050,90051,50028,000
    Pakistan9,56020,00027,90012,000
    Indian sub-continent30,40073,90083,30042,400
    Middle East
    Iran4,0704,0006,6404,750
    Iraq1,5101,7702,8201,630
    Israel17,60016,40049,10021,100
    Jordan2,9003,9105,0802,810
    Kuwait4,0605,82012,4003,670
    Lebanon3,2904,3705,4303,580
    Saudi Arabia5,6205,51015,9004,420
    Syria350450860430
    Middle East39,40042,20098,20042,400
    Remainder of Asia
    China2,0703,1403,7402,910
    Indonesia1,1203,6103,7201,730
    Japan102,00076,900110,00088,200
    Malaysia5,3909,94010,8009,860
    Philippines1,9605,0306,8102,740
    Singapore3,78010,7007,2605,860
    Sri Lanka1,9703,6605,4802,640
    Thailand1,9706,5404,2903,040
    BDTC Hong Kong6,3007,73013,1006,300
    Remainder of Asia127,000127,000165,000123,000
    Asia197,000243,000346,000208,000
    Australasia
    Australia33,50071,40092,20055,300
    New Zealand7,40021,20025,90012,100
    Australasia40,90092,600118,00067,400
    British Overseas Citizens1,1401,8802,9201,640
    Other countries not elsewhere specified22,00031,80054,50029,200
    Stateless7,04011,20019,2008,510
    Total visitor admissions in 1988
    Geographical region/Nationality1st quarter2nd quarter3rd quarter4th quarter
    All Nationalities (excluding EC)955,0001,490,0001,980,0001,250,000
    Table 2
    Ordinary and business visitors admitted to the United Kingdom by nationality, 1989
    Total visitor admissions in 1989
    Geographical region/Nationality1st quarter2nd quarter3rd quarter4th quarter
    Western Europe (excluding EC)
    Austria20,90029,60051,20022,900
    Cyprus6,1507,2909,6208,470
    Finland24,50038,70038,00028,000
    Malta7,8205,9309,6108,840
    Norway46,30061,50063,00066,700
    Sweden79,600118,000114,000106,000
    Switzerland43,90069,60078,60063,500
    Turkey11,10011,1009,9609,880
    Yugoslavia6,9809,37011,3009,870
    Western Europe (excluding EC)247,000351,000385,000324,000
    Eastern Europe
    Bulgaria6601,2301,4502,200
    Czechoslovakia2,5704,7407,3104,280
    GDR8901,6801,7201,300
    Hungary3,0405,0907,6204,580
    Poland8,04012,40015,5007,540
    Romania400490870620
    USSR2,4204,8607,8806,790
    Eastern Europe18,00030,50042,40027,300
    Europe (excluding EC)265,000382,000427,000351,000
    Americas
    Argentina3,6603,8604,0502,760
    Barbados4501,3502,580900
    Brazil10,90018,50025,70014,500
    Canada61,500133,000105,00079,200
    Chile1,6102,4302,5201,460
    Colombia1,7603,8804,3502,410
    Cuba5010090210
    Guyana4508701,540770
    Jamaica2,3304,8807,1403,220
    Mexico3,2907,76018,2006,110
    Peru9001,3901,6901,270
    Trinidad and Tobago1,0202,3303,7701,980
    United States of America311,000624,000686,000431,000
    Uruguay5601,2301,260550
    Venezuela1,0301,5203,0901,720
    Americas400,000807,000927,000548,000
    Africa
    Algeria2,9603,30076,1803,410
    Egypt4,7105,94011,5005,520
    Ethiopia6208701,500850
    Ghana3,7504,8807,6105,200
    Kenya3,1605,1808,49094,990
    Libya470620800550
    Mauritius1,8003,6405,4702,410
    Morocco2,3002,8605,3503,560
    Nigeria14,40020,60025,80018,300
    Sierra Leone9801,2002,5601,470
    Somalia240360460280
    South Africa15,40027,30029,60019,100
    Sudan1,3503,2703,4801,850
    Tanzania1,4702,1902,9201,940
    Total visitor admissions in 1989
    Geographical region/Nationality1st quarter2nd quarter3rd quarter4th quarter
    Tunisia1,4101,4601,5001,570
    Uganda1,1301,7202,4801,790
    Zambia1,7302,6003,3802,520
    Zimbabwe3,4305,5504,8704,900
    Africa61,30094,200124,00080,200
    Asia
    Indian sub-continent
    Bangladesh1,8403,1004,3802,480
    India20,70054,40050,90028,000
    Pakistan9,82019,40027,90012,800
    Indian sub-continent32,40076,90083,20043,300
    Middle East
    Iran4,2504,4707,3404,660
    Iraq1,5002,1504,6303,370
    Israel18,50021,10047,40024,500
    Jordan2,4803,1304,8802,680
    Kuwait4,1706,23015,1003,800
    Lebanon3,0903,6105,6303,430
    Saudi Arabia5,0206,08016,4004,230
    Syria380640900470
    Middle East39,40047,700102,00047,100
    Remainder of Asia
    China2,2103,0003,2502,280
    Indonesia1,1503,8104,4802,090
    Japan124,000102,000143,000119,000
    Malaysia5,31010,70012,30010,800
    Philippines1,9005,6007,3302,930
    Singapore3,57012,0008,4507,340
    Sri Lanka1,7703,3604,8902,960
    Thailand2,4707,0305,0803,940
    BDTC Hong Kong7,6609,06015,2007,440
    Remainder of Asia150,000157,000204,000159,000
    Asia222,000282,000389,000249,000
    Australasia
    Australia41,70093,600111,00063,500
    New Zealand8,22023,80027,50015,400
    Australasia49,900117,000138,00078,900
    British Overseas Citizens1,1602,7703,9901,990
    Other countries not elsewhere specified25,00037,00060,80030,500
    Stateless8,52014,70031,90010,800
    All nationalities (excluding EC)1,030,0001,730,0002,100,0001,350,000

    Energy

    Low-Energy Light Bulbs

    To ask the Secretary of State for Energy what representations he has received about the inclusion of low-energy light bulbs in the home energy efficiency scheme; and what has been his response.

    One respondent to the consultation paper on the home energy efficiency scheme (HEES) published earlier this year sought to have the provision of low-energy light bulbs brought within the scheme. HEES is being introduced under powers taken in section 15 of the Social Security Act 1990, which do not enable the scheme to be extended to cover grant for provision of low-energy lighting.

    Powergen

    To ask the Secretary of State for Energy what compensation has been awarded to Mr. Malpas, the ex-chairman of PowerGen; and how many years' salary it is equivalent to.

    The question of compensation is under discussion between PowerGen and Mr. Malpas.

    Dounreay

    To ask the Secretary of State for Energy what long-term assessment he has made (a) of the consequences of current rundown at Dounreay for the United Kingdom's fuel requirements in the 21st century and (b) of Sir Frederick Warner's and Dr. Eric Vocie's evidence to the Select Committee on Energy in relation to Dounreay.

    I refer the hon. Member to the statement made by my predecessor on 21 July 1988 about the Government's review of the fast reactor programme. That review took full account of the position on uranium supplies in the next century.

    North Sea Installations

    To ask the Secretary of State for Energy whether there are any platforms on North sea installations on which full emergency shutdown valves have still to be fitted on risers as near to sea level as practicable.

    My Department has identified 181 pipeline risers which require the fitting or relocation of emergency shutdown valves to comply with the Offshore Installations (Emergency Pipeline Valve) Regulations 1989. A total of 72 valves remain to be fitted or relocated.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Energy (1) what was the ratio of injuries, excluding fatal injuries, suffered by operators' staff to those suffered by contractors' staff on North sea installations in each year since 1978;(2) what was the ratio of fatal accidents suffered by operators' staff to those suffered by contractors' staff on North sea installations in each year since 1978.

    The information requested by the hon. Member can be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Energy on how many risers on platforms in the North sea it is intended to retrofit subsea isolation valves; and how many of these have been fitted to date.

    A total of 35 subsea isolation systems have been fitted retrospectively to existing pipelines and plans have been made for a further six systems to be so installed.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Energy if he will list the platforms in the North sea which have control systems of the same age as that on Piper Alpha.

    Control systems on offshore installations may be modified as technology develops. Such modifications are a matter for the operators and the certifying authorities.

    Foreign And Commonwealth Affairs

    Katyn Massacres

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement on his Department's policy on ascribing responsibility for the Katyn massacres; and to whom he currently ascribes responsibility for the massacres.

    The Soviet authorities' admission in April that the NKVD (forerunner of the KGB) was responsible for the massacre was very welcome.

    Antarctica

    Mr. Simon Hughes