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Yugoslavia

Volume 228: debated on Thursday 8 July 1993

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To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what assessment he has made of the extent of mobilisation of Bosnian-Croat citizens in Bosnia-Herzegovina on 30 June; what action he plans in the event of fighting by these forces: if he will bring forward plans to impose economic and diplomatic sanctions against the Republic of Croatia; and if he will make a statement.

We are aware of reports that all three parties in the conflict in Bosnia are taking further steps to mobilise their citizens. We are pressing all parties to stop fighting and to support the peace process. We are also pressing the Croatian Government to co-operate fully in this. Croatia was put on notice by the 8 June meeting of EC Foreign Ministers that restrictive measures would he initiated against it if the situation so required.

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how many times representatives of Her Majesty's Government have met President Franjo Tudjman of Croatia since January 1991; and what was the purpose of each meeting.

Representatives of Her Majesty's Government have met President Tudjman and his staff on numerous occasions since January 1991, most recently on 30 May when Her Majesty's ambassador in Zagreb met the President. The main purpose of our representations on this and previous occasions has been to press President Tudjman to co-operate fully with the efforts of the international community to achieve lasting and equitable settlements to the conflict in Bosnia, based on the principles established by the London conference, and to urge restraint in trying to restore Croatian sovereignty in the Serb-occupied Krajinas.

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how many times representatives of Her Majesty's Government have met President Izetbegovic of Bosnia-Herzegovina since January 1991; and what was the purpose of each meeting.

Representatives of Her Majesty's Government have met President Izetbegovic and his staff on numerous occasions since January 1991, most recently on 14 June 1993 when he visited London for talks with my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs. The main issues raised by President Izetbegovic were the arms embargo on the former Yugoslavia and the fighting in central Bosnia. My right hon. Friend set out British policies and encouraged President Izetbegovic to engage in negotiations to achieve a lasting and equitable settlement to the conflict in Bosnia, based on the principles of the London conference.

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, pursuant to his answer to the hon. Member for Inverness, Nairn and Lochaber (Sir R. Johnston) of 14, April, Official Report, column 581, what assessment he has made of the relation between that answer, his answer to that hon. Member in the Official Report, column 580 and information contained in United Nations Security Council note verbale, dated 16 March 1993, Ref. S/24900/Add. 27; on what basis the assumption was made that aircraft crossing the borders of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia into Bosnia-Herzegovina were flown by Bosnian Serbs; and what subsequent information he has received about the incident.

The information referred to in the written answer given on 14 April to the hon. Member for Inverness, Nairn and Lochaber by my right hon. Friend the then Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs is contained in note verbale S/24900/Add. 30 of 26 March from the United Nations Secretary-General to the president of the Security Council. The aircraft observed at Gladovici on 13 March were seen to withdraw towards the Bosnian/Serbian border following the incident, but have not been definitively attributed to any party.

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what plans he has to urge the Security Council to defer decisions on actions in the former Yugoslavia until reliable evidence is available on which to make decisions.

In taking decisions on the former Yugoslavia, as on other areas of the world where there is a need to maintain international peace and security, Security Council members take account of the views of the United Nations Secretary-General as set out in his reports, as well as their own knowledge and assessment of a situation.