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Written Answers

Volume 228: debated on Thursday 8 July 1993

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Written Answers To Questions

Thursday 8 July 1993

Lord Chancellor's Department

Murder Cases

To ask the Parliamentary Secretary, Lord Chancellor's Department if he will ensure that, in murder cases where hon. Members have raised the conviction with members of the Government, transcripts or notes of the trial are retained longer than the five year norm provided that the hon. Member is still seeking a review of the case, regardless of whether it has gone to appeal.

If an hon. Member seeks a review of a murder case, he, or others, may purchase any transcript required within the five-year period. On request, the Department will supply details of the contractor responsible for keeping the particular record.Applications for leave to appeal are required to be lodged within 28 days and reasons to justify any extension of time are required. If there has been an application for leave to appeal, transcript relevant to the grounds of appeal will have been obtained and will be retained indefinitely in appeals against a murder conviction. The Royal Commission on criminal justice made no recommendation to extend the five-year period for the keeping of a verbatim record and I see no case to do so.

To ask the Parliamentary Secretary, Lord Chancellor's Department what arrangements are made for the storage of transcripts or notes of the trials in murder cases which have gone to appeal.

The verbatim record is kept for five years after it was taken, regardless of whether there is an appeal. Transcripts are not automatically produced for cost reasons, but may be purchased if required within the five-year period.If there is an appeal against a murder conviction, any transcripts purchased by the Court of Appeal and the documents provided by the Crown court to the Court of Appeal are retained indefinitely by arrangement with the Public Record Office.

To ask the Parliamentary Secretary, Lord Chancellor's Department if he will make it his policy, in circumstances in which the Home Office has requested from an hon. Member representing the interests of a convicted murderer a statement concerning that case, to provide the hon. Member on request with a transcript of the relevant portions of the trial including the summings up by counsel for the defence, the prosecution and the trial judge.

Verbatim records of murder trials are retained for five years. If a transcript is required by an hon. Member, the Home Office, or another organisation or person, it must be purchased within the five-year period. The contractor responsible for keeping the records will be required to meet any such request. It would not be appropriate for my Department to meet the costs of such transcription.A verbatim record of the evidence and a trial judge's summing up is always taken, but prosecution and defence closing speeches are not matters of evidence or law which a jury are required to have regard to. A record of these may not be available as there is no requirement to record them.

Home Department

Serious Fraud Office

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what was the rank of the officer or officers of the City of London police who on or about 1 April 1992 prepared letters purporting to have been written, respectively by the right hon. Member for Tweeddale, Ettrick and Lauderdale (Sir D. Steel) and Mr. D. W. Freeman in connection with a case under investigation by the Serious Fraud Office; what disciplinary proceedings have been taken; and if he will make a statement.

These are matters for the Commissioner of Police for the City of London.

Police (Assaults)

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many officers in each police force in the United Kingdom have had to retire from their jobs as a result of injuries caused by assault in each year since 1979.

The information requested is not held centrally for police forces in England and Wales. I understand from my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Scotland that this is also the case for Scotland. If individual forces were able to provide the information requested, it could be collected only at disproportionate cost.I understand from my right hon. and learned Friend the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland that his Department holds information about retirements from the Royal Ulster Constabulary from which the information requested could be extracted in respect of former RUC police officers. If my hon. Friend writes to him, he will provide the information.

Police (Civilian Staff)

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how he expects the recommendation in his White Paper that civilian staff employed for police purposes should be employed by the chief constable to work in practice.

It is too early to say how the detailed arrangements for the employment of civilian staff in the police service will be managed. Civilian staff have an increasingly important part to play in the provision of a good quality police service. It therefore seems appropriate, and in the interests of all those working in the police service, that the civilian staff should be directly employed by the chief constable.

Sunday Trading

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when he will publish his plans to reform Sunday trading law in England and Wales.

We intend to lay before Parliament next week and publish on 13 July a draft Sunday trading Bill together with a covering text describing the options for reform.

Family Reunification

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department in what ways United Kingdom legislation will have to be changed to implement the resolution on family reunification adopted by the Ministers responsible for immigration at their meeting in Copenhagen on 1 and 2 June; and what cost implications this will have.

There will be no need to amend primary legislation to implement the resolution on family reunification.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list the international conventions and fundamental provisions in national legislation which the Ministers responsible for immigration indicated would be taken into account in their resolution on family reunification at their meeting in Copenhagen on 1 and 2 June; and which of these obligations are relevant to the implementation of this resolution in United Kingdom law.

It is not possible to provide an exhaustive list of all the international conventions which the United Kingdom has ratified or the provisions in domestic legislation which might be relevant. However, the following are likely to be applicable:

International Conventions
  • (a) The United Nations Convention on Human Rights;
  • (b) The European Convention on Human Rights;
  • (c) The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child;
  • (d) The European Convention on the Adoption of Children;
  • (e) The United Nations Convention on Refugees.
  • 2. Domestic legislation
  • (a) The Immigration Act, 1971;
  • (b) The Marriage Act, 1949;
  • (c) The Children Act, 1989;
  • (d) The Adoption Act, 1976, together with the equivalent Act and Order for Scotland and Northern Ireland;
  • (e) The Family Law Reform Act, 1987.
  • Dogs (Tail Docking)

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what measures will be taken against those veterinary surgeons who continue to dock the tails of dogs; and if he will make a statement.

    It is a matter for the royal college to determine what controls to impose over veterinary surgeons.

    Drinking And Driving

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will estimate for each year since 1967 the number of times a week people drive motor vehicles after consuming more than the legal limit for alcohol for drivers and the number of related deaths each year.

    Such estimates are not available. However, the average weekly number of screening breath tests in England and Wales for the years 1968 to 1992 and the number of fatalities per year involving illegal alcohol levels are as follows:

    Average number of screening breath tests per weekAnnual number of fatalities in accidents involving illegal alcohol levels1
    1968980
    19691,130
    19701,400
    19711,860
    19722,310
    19732,540
    19742,380
    19752,580
    19762,580
    19772,520
    19782,730
    19793,1501,790
    19803,4601,570
    19813,4001,540
    19823,9801,670
    19834,6301,200
    19844,0001,280
    19854,8101,130
    19865,8301,060
    19877,690980
    19888,520840
    198910,400870
    199011,480800
    199110,810700
    199210,210

    1 Source: Department of Transport. Figures for years prior to 1979 not available. Figures for 1992 not yet available.

    Treason

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what plans he has to review United Kingdom legislation on treason.

    Quangos

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list the former Members of this House who have been appointed since 1988 by his Department to quasi autonomous non-governmental organisations; and if he will list in each case the title of the post, the salary, the duration of the appointment, and the party which the former hon. Member represented.

    The following former Members have been appointed to Home Office non-departmental public bodies:

    • David Bellotti
    • Trustee of the Community Development Foundation
    • Expenses only
    • Appointed January 1992 for 3 years
    • Liberal Democrat
    • Right hon. Lord Carlisle of Bucklow, QC
    • Chairman of the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board
    • Salary £31,350
    • Appointed 1 March 1989 until 31 March 1995
    • Conservative
    • John Cartwright
    • Member of the Police Complaints Authority
    • Salary £38,020
    • Appointed for 3 years from October 1992
    • SDP
    • Sheila Faith
    • Member of the Parole Board
    • Fee Paid; £139 per attendance
    • Appointed 1 June 1991 for 3 years
    • Conservative
    • Ben Ford
    • Member of the Firearms Consultative Committee
    • Expenses only
    • Appointed 1989 for 2 years
    • Labour
    • Lord Kimball
    • Chairman of the Firearms Consultative Committee
    • Expenses only
    • Appointed for 5 years from 1989
    • Conservative
    • Anna McCurley
    • Member of the Horserace Betting Levy Board
    • Salary £11,640
    • Appointed 1988 for 3 years extended until 1994
    • Conservative
    • Michael Meadowcroft
    • Trustee of the Community Development Foundation
    • Expenses only
    • Appointed 1986, extended until 1994
    • Liberal
    • Norman Miscampbell, QC
    • Member of the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board
    • Fee £246 per day
    • Appointed 22 March 1993 until 31 March 1995
    • Conservative
    • Lord Wyatt of Weeford
    • Chairman of the Horserace Totalisator-Board
    • Salary £90,918
    • Appointed 1976; reappointed 1993 for 2 years
    • Labour
    Information in respect of the parole local review committees is not readily available and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost. Information in respect of the Fire Services Examination Board is not available.

    Prison Security Guards

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is the current standard hourly rate for prison security guards.

    Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the prison service. I have asked him to arrange for a reply to be given.

    Letter from Derek Lewis to Mr. Jon Owen Jones, dated July 1993:

    The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent question about the current standard hourly rate for prison security guards.

    Subsequent to the introduction of Fresh Start in 1987 prison officers receive an annual salary paid monthly. They are conditioned to an average week of 39 hours net, any additional hours worked are compensated for by time off in lieu as they are a non overtime grade.

    Prison Officers have a seven point pay scale with a 10 and 15 year increment. The hourly rate ranges from £7.42 at the minimum to £9.25 at the 15 year point. These salaries are part of the annual pay negotiations between the Treasury and the Prison Officers Association and will be uplifted from 1 April 1993. Any increase will be within the Government pay restraints and be limited to between 0 to 1.5 per cent. increase.

    Duchy Of Lancaster

    Quangos

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster if he will list the former Members of this House who have been appointed by his Department to quasi-autonomous non-governmental organisations; and if he will list in each case the title of the post, the salary, the duration of the appointment, and the party which the former hon. Member represented.

    No former Members of this House have been appointed by my right hon. Friend to the non-departmental public bodies for which he has had responsibility since the creation of his Department in April 1992.

    Transport

    Airports

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what measures are being taken to improve the services offered by major United Kingdom international airports; and if he will make a statement.

    The Government believe that increasing the scope for airport operators to respond to commercial pressures offers the best route for improving the services offered at all airports. This underlies the Government's policy of encouraging increased private sector involvement in the ownership and management of local authority-owned airports.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many passengers used (a) Gatwick airport and (b) Heathrow airport in each year since 1979.

    The numbers of passengers at (a) Gatwick airport and (b) Heathrow airport are shown in the table.

    Terminal passengers at Heathrow and Gatwick 1979–92
    YearGatwick (000)Heathrow (000)
    19798,96527,979
    19809,70327,484
    198110,72526,411
    198211,15526,406
    198312,47126,767
    198413,95329,164
    198514,88531,310
    198616,30931,310
    198719,38134,743
    198820,74437,510
    198921,14939,587
    199021,04342,635
    199118,69040,245
    199219,84244,964

    Private Aircraft

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many people flying in private aeroplanes have been killed in aviation accidents in United Kingdom air space in each year since 1987.

    The Civil Aviation Authority's safety data analysis unit advises me that the number of people flying in private aeroplanes that have been killed in aviation accidents in United Kingdom airspace since 1987 are as follows:

    YearNumber of Fatal AccidentsFatalities
    PassengersCrew
    1987242324
    19881069
    198919419
    1990191319
    199117418
    1992161014

    Trust Ports

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what has been the total receipts from the privatisation of trust ports to date.

    The total receipts to the Exchequer from the five ports privatised last year under the Ports Act 1991 was £169 million.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport when he expects to announce the timetable for privatisation of the next wave of trust ports.

    I refer my hon. Friend to the answer I gave on 12 March, Official Report, column 769. The power that the Secretary of State has under the Ports Act 1991, to require the larger trust ports. with a turnover above a specified threshold, to privatise themselves, will become available after 24 July 1993. The Secretary of State expects to make an announcement as soon as he has completed his consideration on the way in which he should use his power of compulsion.All trust ports can use the Act at any time to take action to privatise themselves. Five have already done so, we hope more will follow.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will list those trust ports with whom he has discussed privatisation.

    The Secretary of State has not yet decided which trust ports he will formally consult, under the terms of the Ports Act 1991, in respect of his power to require privatisation.

    Piracy

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many (a) merchant ships and (b) British-owned merchant ships have been victims of piracy or other attacks in the last five years.

    Shipowners, flag states and coastal states are encouraged to report incidents of piracy and armed robbery against vessels to the International Maritime Organisation. When we are advised of incidents involving British ships we report them to IMO. However, there is no requirement in international law to report attacks and masters and shipowners can he reluctant to do so. As a result, records are incomplete.Full information in the form requested is not available. The table, however, gives an indication of trends during the past five years on incidents of piracy affecting tankers.

    YearAll flagsUK flags
    198850
    198930
    199030
    1991362
    1992220
    The Government are concerned about the under reporting of attacks. We have produced comprehensive advice in "Merchant Shipping Notice M1517" urging mariners to report any attack or attempted attack to the flag and coastal states concerned.

    South China Sea

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will hold talks with the National Union of Marine, Aviation and Shipping Transport Officers about providing armed escorts for all British or commonwealth vessels passing through the South China sea.

    We are willing to consider any representations from NUMAST and other shipping interests. We treat the problems in the South China sea very seriously indeed and hope that the matter can be solved through multilateral and bilateral co-operation. At the present time, we do not believe there is a need for armed escorts.

    A1, Northumbria

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport at how many points between Morpeth and the Scottish border the A 1 is currently reduced to one-way operation by temporary traffic lights; how many of these interruptions result from works which will result in improvement to dual carriageway status; and which of these interruptions will continue through the Scottish and English bank holiday weekends.

    The A1 is currently reduced to one-way operation by temporary traffic signals at the following five locations:

    • Bockenfield, south of Felton;
    • Brownieside, north of Alnwich;
    • Detchant, north of Belford;
    • Scremerston, south of Berwick; and
    • Marshall Meadows, north of Berwick.
    Of these, the works at Brownieside and Marshall Meadows will result in improvement to dual carriageway status.Traffic signals will continue to operate at Bockenfield, Brownieside and Detchant for the Scottish bank holiday weekend. Arrangements have been made to remove all traffic signals for the English bank holiday weekend.

    Central Line

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) what proposals he is considering in respect of an alternative public transport service between Epping and Ongar should London Transport close this part of the Central line; and if he will make a statement;(2) if he will make a statement on the current situation in respect of the Central line service between Epping and Ongar.

    On 5 May 1993, London Underground Ltd. published notice of its intention to seek closure of the Central line between Epping and Ongar. Due to the Secretary of State's quasi-judicial role in the closure proceedings, it would not be appropriate for me to make any comments on the subject at this stage.

    Buses, Dorset

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many passenger miles were travelled by bus in Dorset in each year since 1988–89.

    [holding answer 7 July 1993]: The Department does not collect information on passenger mileage from operators. National estimates are imputed from the passenger journey information collected in a survey and national estimates of average journey cost. The survey samples are selected to be representative at the national level and could not be used to produce county information.

    Social Security

    Severe Hardship Payments

    To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security what are the administration costs of the severe hardship payments.

    The administration of income support is a matter for Mr. Michael Bichard, the chief executive of the Benefits Agency. He will write to the hon. Member and a copy will be placed in the Library.

    Letter from Michael Bichard to Mr. Alan Simpson, dated 7 July 1993:

    As Chief Executive of the Benefits Agency it is my responsibility to answer questions about relevant operational matters. I am therefore replying to your recent Parliamentary Question to the Secretary of State for Social Security asking what are the administration costs of the severe hardship payments.

    For the financial year 1992–93 the administration costs of the Severe Hardship Claims Unit in Glasgow were £676,714.

    Associated administration costs arise within the Benefits Agency District Offices. Those costs cannot be separately identified for the year 1992–93. However they are estimated at £1.5 million.

    I hope that you find this reply helpful. A copy will appear in the Official Report and a copy will also be placed in the Library.

    Fraud, Blackpool

    To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security if he will make a statement about social security fraud in Blackpool.

    The administration of benefit fraud is a matter for Mr. Michael Bichard, the chief executive of the Benefits Agency. He will write to my hon. Friend and a copy will be placed in the Library.

    Letter from Michael Bichard to Mr. Harold Elletson, dated 7 July 1993:

    As Chief Executive of the Benefits Agency it is my responsibility to answer questions about relevant operational matters. I am therefore replying to your recent Parliamentary Question to the Secretary of State for Social Security requesting him to make a statement about social security fraud in Blackpool.

    The investigation of potentially fraudulent claims was reorganised in January 1991 when Fraud Sectors were formed.

    The Blackpool Sector covers an area on the Fylde coast North to Fleetwood/Knott End, South to Lytham St. Annes and East to the outskirts of Preston.

    There are currently a total of 13.5 full time members of staff devoted to the investigation of suspect claims although three of these posts are clerical support rather than investigators.

    In the year ending 31 March 1993 Blackpool sector conducted 2,158 investigations. Of this total, 914 cases resulted in a weekly benefit saving and a further 304 cases produced an instrument of payment saving. In addition, an overpayment was detected in a further 304 cases. The total gross savings exceeded £2.5 million. Seven people were prosecuted in the same period and all were found guilty.

    In addition to the Sector fraud staff who have carried out the activities as detailed above, there has been an input from a mobile team who are based at Area level and who can be called on to assist Sector staff at times of staff shortage, high intake of work or to conduct pro-active investigations into larger scale fraudulent activities.

    In the past three months the Mobile Team has conducted a number of investigations, two of which were particularly successful.

    In the first exercise over 1,600 visits were made to check the addresses of people claiming benefits. It was confirmed that 267 people were not living at the quoted address. The full results of the savings are not yet known as the exercise is not yet completed but they are anticipated to be considerable.

    The second exercise involved the arrest by the Police of six people in connection with instrument of payment abuse. Over 100 people were interviewed by members of the Mobile Team and instrument of payment savings of £50,000 were recorded.

    I should stress that the vast majority of the Benefit Agency's customers are genuine and will never have any contact with any of our Investigators. The investigators exist to ensure that the honest customer's benefit goes to that customer.

    I hope you find this reply helpful. A copy will appear in the Official Report and a copy will be placed in the Library.

    Child Benefit

    To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security what was the total cost of child benefit in each year since 1979 with the figures adjusted for inflation.

    The information is in the table.

    Child benefit expenditure
    Cash (£ million)1992–93 prices (£ million)
    11978–792,2966,479
    1979–802,7876,762
    1980–812,9446,036
    1981–823,3726,305
    1982–833,6606,389
    1983–843,9886,653
    1984–854,2766,793
    1985–864,4686,727
    1986–874,5136,579
    1987–884,5986,357
    1988–894,5155,821
    1989–904,5375,489
    1990–914,5915,133
    1991–925,1895,423
    1992–935,7675,767
    1 Figures include cost of Child Tax Allowance.

    Income Statistics

    To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security if he will provide statistics similar to table A3, page 63, of the "Households Below Average Income Statistical Analysis" 1979, 1990–91, to include the top 40 per cent., 30 per cent., 20 per cent. and 10 per cent. of income distribution for 1979, 1988–89 and 1990–91, for income before housing costs and income after housing costs.

    The information is in the tables.

    Share of total income (per cent.) (including self-employed)
    19791988–891990–91
    Income before housing costs
    Top 40 per cent.586364
    Top 30 per cent.475253
    Top 20 per cent.354041
    Top 10 per cent.212526
    Percentage change 1979 to 1990–91 in real income by decile group.
    Decile Group Median
    Including self-employedDecile 6Decile 7Decile 8Decile 9Decile 10
    Income before housing costs2731364358
    Income after housing costs2833384562
    Decile Group Median
    Excluding self-employedDecile 6Decile 7Decile 8Decile 9Decile 10
    Income before housing costs2730364356
    Income after housing costs2833384461

    Note:

    Figures relate to the United Kingdom and are based on income equivalised for the household size and composition.

    Disability Living Allowance

    To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security when he will respond to the report by the Social Security Select Committee's third report on the delivery of disability living allowance and disability working allowance.

    The Government's response—Cm 2282—is published today. Copies have been placed in the Library.

    Crisis Loans

    To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security what is the latest available information for the district covering Stockport and nationally on the number and applications for crisis loans dealt with by social fund officers because of re-alignment of unemployment benefit.

    The administration of the social fund is a matter for Mr. Michael Bichard, the chief executive of the Benefits Agency. He will write to the hon. Member with such information as is available and a copy will be placed in the Library.

    Letter from Michael Bichard to Ms Ann Coffey, dated 7 July 1993:

    As Chief Executive of the Benefits Agency, it is my responsibility to answer questions about relevant operational matters. I am therefore replying to your recent Parliamentary Question to the Secretary of State for Social Security asking

    Share of total income (per cent.) (including self-employed)

    1979

    1988–89

    1990–91

    Income after housing costs

    Top 40 per cent.586465
    Top 30 per cent.485355
    Top 20 per cent.354143
    Top 10 per cent.212627

    Note:

    The figures in the tables are based on equivalised income for household size and composition.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security if he will provide similar statistics to table A1, page 60, of "Households Below Average Income" 1979, 1990–91, to include decile 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 including the self-employed, before housing costs and after housing costs, and excluding self-employed before housing costs and after housing costs.

    The information is in the tables.what is the latest available information for the district covering Stockport and nationally on the number of applications for crisis loans dealt with by Social Fund Officers because of re-alignment of unemployment benefit.I am unable to give the information you requested because the statistical information kept does not identify the individual benefits involved in such applications. I can, however, provide details of the number of crisis loans awarded to applicants whose benefit is paid in arrears. For the period 1 April 1993 to 30 May 1993 (latest available data) the figure for the Stockport District is 323. The national figure for the same period is 39,350.I hope you find this reply helpful. A copy will appear in the Official Report and a copy will also be placed in the Library.

    Trade And Industry

    Burma

    To ask the President of the Board of Trade what deputations his Department has recently received from Burma; what trade matters were discussed; and what is Her Majesty's Government's policy towards trade with Burma.

    My Department has received no deputations from Burma recently. The Government's policy is to provide no specific encouragement to British firms to trade or invest in Burma in view of the current political and economic situation there. The United Kingdom does not sell arms to Burma and our aid programme, like that of other donors, has been suspended since 1988. British business visitors to Rangoon can of course look to our embassy there for advice and support. Firms seek advice on trading with Burma are always made aware of the Government's policy.

    Quangos

    To ask the President of the Board of Trade if he will list the names of individuals who (a) are spouses of hon. Members, (b) are members of the House of Lords, (c) are spouses of members of the House of Lords and (d) have been party candidates for Parliament, indicating for which party, who have been appointed by his Department since 1988 to quasi-autonomous non-governmental organisations giving, in each case, the title of the post, any salary payable, and the duration of the appointment.

    My right hon. Friend the President of the Board of Trade is responsible for a total of more than 800 public appointments. Of these:

  • (a) James Roe (spouse of Marion Roe, Conservative MP for Broxbourne) has been appointed as a reserve member of the Monopolies and Mergers Commission at a salary of £8,490 per annum for the period 1 February 1993 to 31 January 1996.
  • (b) Viscount Chelmsford has been appointed as a member of the Simpler Trade Procedures Board for the period 1 November 1992 to 31 October 1995. The post is unpaid.
  • (c) Lady Jane Forbes (spouse of Lord Forbes, KBE) was re-appointed as a member of the Post Office Users Council for Scotland for the period 1 October 1991 to 30 September 1995 and as a member of the Scottish Advisory Committee on Telecommunications for the period 1 October 1991 to 30 September 1993. Both appointments are unpaid.
  • We do not collect information on the political affiliations of those appointed or details of those who have been party candidates for Parliament.

    Beer

    To ask the President of the Board of Trade if he will make a statement on the effects of the Beer Orders on the brewing industry and consumers.

    There have been considerable changes in the brewing industry since the implementation of the orders. However, it is difficult to separate the effects of the orders from other developments within the industry, some of which are part of long term trends beginning before the Monopolies and Mergers Commission review.We believe that it is too soon to make an assessment of the impact of the orders. The overriding need now is for a period of stability for both brewers and tenants/lessees. The Agriculture Select Committee's report on the effects of the Beer Orders on the brewing industry and consumers supported this view.

    Telecommunications Council

    To ask the President of the Board of 'Trade, pursuant to his answer to the hon. Member for Norwich, North (Mr. Thompson) of 30 June, Official Report, columns 511–12, what were the voting figures for each decision taken at the European Community's Telecommunications Council held on 16 June; and if he will make it his policy to include in future statements on Council meetings information on whether formal votes were taken and which member states voted in favour, against or abstained on particular measures.

    No formal votes were taken at the European Community's Telecommunications Council held on 16 June. I regret that this was not made clear in my answer of 30 June, in accordance with the undertaking given to the hon. Member that statements to the House following meetings of the Council of Ministers will either include details of the record of the vote whenever a formal vote is taken, or report that no formal votes were taken.

    Civil Nuclear Sites

    To ask the President of the Board of Trade if he will list the civil nuclear sites in the United Kingdom, together with the expiry dates of their current operational site licences.

    The table shows the civil nuclear sites in the United Kingdom, all of which are licensed by the Health and Safety Executive under the provisions of the Nuclear Installations Act 1965, as amended.A nuclear site licence is issued without limit of time, but may at any time be revoked by the Health and Safety Executive or surrendered by the licensee with the executive's agreement. The licensee continues to be responsible for the site, and subject to direction by the Health and Safety Executive, until in the opinion of the executive there has ceased to be any danger from ionising radiations from anything on the site, or until a new nuclear site licence is issued to some other person.

    List of nuclear licensed sites
    SiteOperator
    Berkeley Power StationNuclear Electric plc
    Berkeley
    Gloucestershire GL13 9PA
    Bradwell Power StationNuclear Electric plc
    Bradwell-on-Sea
    Southminster
    Essex CM 10 7HP
    Dungeness Power StationNuclear Electric plc
    Romney Marsh
    Kent TN29 9PP
    Hartlepool Power StationNuclear Electric plc
    Tees Road
    Hartlepool
    Cleveland TS25 2BZ
    Heysham Power StationNuclear Electric plc
    Heysham
    Morecambe
    Lancashire LA3 2XQ
    Hinkley Point Power StationNuclear Electric plc
    Nr. Bridgwater
    Somerset TA5 IND
    Oldbury Power StationNuclear Electric plc
    Oldbury-on-Severn
    Avon BR 12 1RQ
    Sizewell Power StationNuclear Electric plc
    Leiston
    Suffolk 1P16 4UE
    Trawsfynydd Power StationNuclear Electric plc
    Trawsfynydd
    Blaenau Ffestiniog
    Gwynedd LL41 4DJ
    Wylfa Power StationNuclear Electric plc
    Camaes Bay
    Gwynedd LL67 0DH
    SiteOperator
    Capenhurst WorksBritish Nuclear Fuels plc
    Capenhurst
    Chester CH1 6ER
    Capenhurst WorksUrenco (Capenhurst) Ltd.
    Capenhurst
    Chester CHI 6ER
    Drigg Storage SiteBritish Nuclear Fuels plc
    Drigg
    Cumbria
    Sellafield WorksBritish Nuclear Fuels plc
    Seascale
    Cumbria CA20 1PG
    Springfields WorksBritish Nuclear Fuels plc
    Salwick
    Nr. Preston
    Lancashire PR4 0XJ
    Amersham InternationalAmersham International plc
    White Lion Road
    Amersham
    Buckinghamshire HP7 9LL
    Radiation Sources (Harwell)Amersham International plc
    Isotope Production Unit
    Didcot
    OxonOXll 0RA
    Forrest FarmAmersham International plc
    Whitchurch
    Cardiff CF4 7J2
    AEA TechnologyUnited Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority
    Harwell Laboratory
    Didcot
    Oxfordshire OX 11 0RA
    AEA TechnologyUnited Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority
    Winfrith Technology Centre
    Dorchester
    Dorset DT2 8DH
    AEA TechnologyUnited Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority
    Springfields Works
    Salwick
    Nr. Preston
    Lancashire
    AEA TechnologyUnited Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority
    Windscale
    Cumbria
    TRIGA ReactorICI Chemicals and Polymers Ltd.
    Billingham
    Cleveland ST23 2JB
    Rolls-RoyceRolls-Royce
    Raynesway
    POBox31
    Derbyshire DE2 8BJ
    Manchester UniversityManchester University
    Research Reactor
    Risley
    Warrington
    Cheshire WA3 6AT
    University of London ReactorImperial College
    Imperial College Field Station
    Silwood Park
    Ascot
    Berkshire SL5 7PY
    SiteOperator
    Barrow ShipyardVickers Shipbuilding and Engineering Ltd.
    PO Box 6
    Barrow in Furness
    Lancashire LA 14 1AF
    Devonport Royal DockyardDevonport Management Ltd.
    Devonport
    Plymouth PL1 4SR
    2.SCOTLAND
    Hunterston Power StationScottish Nuclear Ltd.
    West Kilbride
    Ayrshire KA23 9QT
    Torness Power StationScottish Nuclear Ltd.
    Dunbar
    East Lothian EH42 1QZ
    Chapelcross WorksBritish Nuclear Fuels plc
    Annan
    Dumfries and Galloway DG12 6RF
    Scottish UniversitiesUniversity of Glasgow
    Research Reactor
    East Kilbride
    Nr. Glasgow G75 0QU
    Rosyth Royal DockyardBabcock Thorn Ltd.
    Rosyth
    Fife KY11 2YD
    AEA TechnologyUnited Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority
    Dounreay
    Thurso
    Caithness KW14 7TZ

    Thorp

    To ask the President of the Board of Trade if he will publish the residues specification issued to overseas customers for THORP, to which reference is made at page six of the report of the Radioactive Waste Management Advisory Committee appended to the chairman of that Committee's reply of 10 October 1992 to the letter of 11 March 1992 from the Secretary of State.

    Public Bodies

    To ask the President of the Board of Trade to whom each of the executive non-departmental public bodies sponsored by his Department is responsible: whether the public bodies or their members in each case are subject to (a) surcharge, (b) investigation by the Parliamentary Commissioner, (c) scrutiny by the Audit Commission or National Audit Office, (d) the statutory provisions for open government which apply to local authorities, (e) performance indicators and (f) provisions under the citizens charters; and whether the chairpersons and members of the boards of each of these bodies are required to declare an interest.

    [holding answer 6 July 1993]: All the executive NDPBs sponsored by the Department are accountable to DTI Ministers for their use of public funds and we are accountable to Parliament. The specific answers to the questions are:

  • (a) No.
  • (b) No.
  • (c) Yes, where the body receives grant or grant-in-aid.
  • (d) No.
  • (e) Yes, where appropriate.
  • (f) The citizens charter applies to all NDPBs which provide a public service.
  • The chairmen and members of the boards are expected to declare an interest where relevant.

    Science Base Funding

    To ask the President of the Board of Trade what plans he has to increase the science base funding for industry; and if he will make a statement.

    I have been asked to reply.As explained in the White Paper on science, engineering and technology, "Realising our Potential", the Government intend that decisions on priorities for support of the science and engineering base should be much more clearly related to meeting the country's needs and enhancing its wealth creating capacity. To this end: it is establishing a technology foresight capability; it is creating two new research councils to cover biotechnology and biological sciences, and engineering and physical sciences; it has provided all research councils with a mission statement which recognises the importance of research undertaken to meet the needs of users; and it is taking measures to improve the links between the councils and cognate Government Departments. Moreover, the LINK scheme will continue to be an important vehicle for the research councils collaboration with industry, and the Office of Science and Technology will now take lead responsibility for the scheme, with the LINK steering group reporting jointly to the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and the President of the Board of Trade.

    Overseas Development Administration

    Burma

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what is the involvement of United Nations, the United Nations Development Programme, UNICEF, the World Health Organisation, the UNDCP and the Food and Agriculture Organisation in Burma.

    The United Nations Under-Secretary for Humanitarian Affairs is involved in talks with the Burmese authorities about the return of the Rohingya refugees from Bangladesh'. The involvement of UN agencies in Burma is as follows.

    UNDP: Since the 1992 Governing Council, all UNDP assistance in Burma has been targeted specifically at grassroots level. Projects are approved on a case-by-case basis by the UNDP Administrator, and funding is only being released on a strictly limited basis.
    UNICEF: The programme in Burma concentrates on mother and child health care, basic education and access to safe drinking water.
    WHO: The programme has been reduced since July 1992 in response to UNDP's directive to limit activities. It now concentrates on nursing training and AIDS.
    UNDCP: A number of projects both in Burma and in the border areas of neighbouring states are funded to encourage the reduction of drug trafficking, and of demand, supply and abuse of drugs. Specific activities include the replacement of opium based economic activity by income substitution programmes, and demand reduction through community based education and training.
    FAO: Activities in Burma are largely rural based agricultural projects, including research and training. Many are UNDP funded and fall within the restrictions placed on the UNDP programme.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what accountability there is for United Nations activity and that of related organisations for their work in Burma; and if he will place reports on this subject by such organisations in the Library.

    The United Nations and related organisations operating in Burma are accountable, through their headquarters management, to their governing bodies. Members of these bodies, including the United Kingdom, monitor closely the activities of these organisations.There are no relevant reports which could be placed in the Library of the House.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what checks there have been to ensure that international aid to Burma has not been used for military purposes.

    We have no evidence that international aid is being diverted for military purposes. The mandates of the United Nations, its funds and programmes and the specialised agencies in the economic and social fields preclude any assistance for military purposes. In the case of Burma, the work of the United Nations system is being scrutinised with special care to ensure that none of its assistance is diverted to military uses. The international financial institutions do not grant loans for military purposes, and carry out the normal financial and audit checks on the use of their funds.

    National Finance

    Taxation

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will list the amounts remitted as a result of (a) hardship, (b) equity and (c) miscellaneous and the amounts written off as a result of (d) insolvency, (e) composition settlements and (f) taxpayer gone abroad or untraceable, for each of capital gains tax, schedule D tax, corporation tax, pay-as-you-earn and national insurance for each year since 1979 as cash figures and as a percentage of each tax collected.

    The information requested is shown in the tables.The amounts of corporation tax remitted or written off as irrecoverable for the reasons outlined are as follows:

    Amounts £ thousands

    Year

    Hardship remitted

    Percentage of total CT paid

    Equity remitted

    Percentage of total CT paid

    Miscellaneous remitted

    Percentage of total CT paid

    Insolvency remitted

    Percentage of total CT paid

    Composition settlements remitted

    Percentage of total CT paid

    Taxpayer gone abroad/away remitted

    Percentage of total CT paid

    1979n/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/a
    1980n/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/a
    198100.004350.012370.0119,7810.6800.002350.01
    198200.002490.012000.0133,0610.8670.008790.02
    198300.002740.012680.0139,3950.97300.009450.02
    198400.001450.003520.0157,5531.2210.0000.00
    198500.002250.002360.0074,8021.2660.00730.00
    198600.003740.009950.0188.9621.09710.009630.01
    198750.004980.018170.0191,4410.91150.00540.00
    198800.003490.002,3600.02222,7251.9020.001610.00
    198900.004780.001,0110.01149,7911.0460.00820.00
    199000.003890.001,9810.01182,2491.15350.00710.00
    199100.004550.002,0650.01317,8642.075290.00160.00
    199200.003070.002,4500.02539,1264.613000.00500.00

    Amounts £ thousands

    Year

    Hardship remitted

    Percentage of total CGT paid

    Equity remitted

    Percentage of total CGT paid

    Miscellaneous remitted

    Percentage of total CGT paid

    Insolvency remitted

    Percentage of total CGT paid

    Composition settlements remitted

    Percentage of total CGT paid

    Taxpayer gone abroad/away remitted

    Percentage of total CGT paid

    1979n/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/a
    1980n/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/a
    1981200.00830.023370.079500.21970.021,2470.27
    1982610.01690.013460.062,1600.354140.071,8180.29
    1983390.01740.014940.082,4590.3980.003,4220.54
    1984340.00340.005190.072,0750.2990.003,3270.47
    198580.001810.028220.101,7020.21180.004,8310.60
    1986190.00680.017220.071,8690.19210.007,3650.73
    1987380.001690.021,3860.122,7140.24160.004,4970.40
    1988300.00580.001,7780.115,5100.35610.005,2440.33
    1989320.001140.001,6980.073,9480.171660.014,8980.21
    199050.00700.002,3080.123,8210.211320.015,7400.31
    1991340.001490.013,9800.2113,9290.751160.0111,5130.62
    1992360.001190.017,3220.6237,1953.16840.0113,0801.10

    Amounts £ thousands

    Year

    Hardship remitted

    Percentage of total CGT paid

    Equity remitted

    Percentage of total CGT paid

    Miscellaneous remitted

    Percentage of total CGT paid

    Insolvency remitted

    Percentage of total CGT paid

    Composition settlements remitted

    Percentage of total CGT paid

    Taxpayer gone abroad/away remitted

    Percentage of total CGT paid

    1979n/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/a
    1980n/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/a
    19811,5750.031,8040.036,4470.1210,6180.192110.0022,9240.42
    19821,8680.032,0080.038,0520.1316,0290.261100.0026,7910.43
    19832,3310.041,8270.0310,1460.1618,6760.29300.0038,0830.59
    19841,9430.031,9600.0313,4180.2030,0100.44870.0046,1600.67
    19851,3740.022,3750.0311,4540.1535,5670.47260.0040,9740.54
    19861,6810.022,8530.0316,5890.1851,3250.54360.0053,6860.57
    19871,8510.033,1830.0521,2530.3055,2600.79790.0054,0280.77
    19881,9330.024,3700.0558,2920.73109,8411.371420.0079,7531.00
    19891,4680.024,5600.0560,7550.65101,4821.092120.0075,1600.80
    19901,6060.025,3020.0552,8340.5098,7460.934740.0098,7400.93
    19912,8960.026,2940.0594,9860.81166,9351.424230.00117,0251.00
    19924,6050.046,3950.05179,8921.39361,3722.803030.00156,4841.21

    Amounts £ thousands

    Year

    Hardship remitted

    Percentage of total PAYE paid

    Equity remitted

    Percentage of total PAYE paid

    Miscellaneous remitted

    Percentage of total PAYE paid

    Insolvency remitted

    Percentage of total PAYE paid

    Composition settlements remitted

    Percentage of total PAYE paid

    Taxpayer gone abroad/away

    Percentage of total PAYE paid

    1979n/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/a
    1980n/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/a
    198150.0000.003430.0010,8850.0500.002080.00

    The amounts of capital gains tax remitted or written off as irrecoverable for the reasons outlined are as follows:

    The amounts of Schedule D tax remitted or written off as irrecoverable for the reasons outlined are as follows:

    The amounts of PAYE remitted or written off as irrecoverable for the reasons outlined are as follows:

    Year

    Hardship remitted

    Percentage of total PAYE paid

    Equity remitted

    Percentage of total PAYE paid

    Miscellaneous remitted

    Percentage of total PAYE paid

    Insolvency remitted

    Percentage of total PAYE paid

    Composition settlements remitted

    Percentage of total PAYE paid

    Taxpayer gone abroad/away

    Percentage of total PAYE paid

    198230.0020.004870.0014,4950.06530.002450.00
    198310.0050.005080.0021,6370.08200.004570.00
    198430.0040.006520.0032,1800.1100.004870.00
    198500.00500.009070.0045,2220.1490.005110.00
    198610.00130.001,1240.0059,1640.17210.005940.00
    198710.0070.001,3670.0090,4390.24130.007390.00
    198800.00240.002,9790.01126,4340.32560.001,2010.00
    198900.00690.002,7150.01118,9620.28770.001,0830.00
    1990110.00640.002,9550.01102,7750.21520.001,3020.00
    199100.00950.004,9730.01128,5700.251090.001,5110.00
    199220.00490.0010,1670.02368,3250.69670.002,5660.00

    Amounts £ thousands

    Year

    Hardship remitted

    Percentage of total NIC paid

    Equity remitted

    Percentage of total NIC paid

    Miscellaneous remitted

    Percentage of total NIC paid

    Insolvency remitted

    Percentage of total NIC paid

    Composition settlements remitted

    Percentage of total NIC paid

    Taxpayer gone abroad/away remitted

    Percentage of total NIC paid

    1979n/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/a
    1980n/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/a
    198130.0010.002270.007520.0000.001750.00
    198230.0020.004100.006230.0060.002170.00
    198310.0020.004410.006680.00180.004250.00
    198440.0050.005990.008920.0000.004720.00
    198510.00270.007810.008640.0060.005340.00
    198610.00110.001,0330.002,6230.01280.006810.00
    198710.0060.001,6620.016,1140.03110.007200.00
    198800.00150.002,9420.0111,9140.04550.009680.00
    198900.00580.002,8290.0111,0480.041090.001,0830.00
    199000.00300.002,9710.0113,2840.04540.009710.00
    199100.003480.004,2580.0115,8470.051840.001,0070.00
    199200.00400.007,2050.0223,8210.07590.001,4450.00

    Life Insurance Companies

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what representations he has received about expenses disclosure as it applies to direct sales forces and tied agents of life insurance companies.

    My right hon. Friend has received a number of such representations in the context of the consultation exercise on the Office of Fair Trading report on the marketing and sale of investment-linked insurance products.

    Manufacturing Industry

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will establish an advisory group of British manufacturers to make recommendations as to how best to modify the taxation system so as to encourage British manufacturing industry.

    Treasury Ministers meet regularly with key individuals and representative bodies in manufacturing industry, and will continue to do so in the period leading up to the Budget in November. Ministers also consider each year a large number of detailed written representations for changes to the tax system as it affects industry. I am not convinced that a further advisory group is needed to supplement these existing channels of communication.

    The amounts of NIC classes 1–1A remitted or written off as irrecoverable for the reasons outlined are as follows:

    Uncollected Tax

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will estimate the amount currently owed in uncollected tax by individuals against whom the Inland Revenue is taking legal proceedings or has proceedings outstanding; and if he will disaggregate that estimate into the amount owed by (a) those currently residing in the United Kingdom and (b) those currently residing abroad in (i) other EC countries, (ii) OECD countries other than the EC and (iii) all other countries.

    Taxes Act 1988

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will estimate the yield to the Exchequer for 1993–94, if subsections (4) to (9) of section 65 of the Taxes Act 1988 were repealed.

    I regret that the information to answer this question is not available.

    Tax Residents

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will estimate the additional revenue to the Exchequer for 1993–94, if, in determining whether an individual is tax resident in the United Kingdom, a day spent in the United Kingdom is deemed to include any day in which the person spends more than three hours of that day in the United Kingdom.

    I regret that the information to answer this question is not available.

    Available Accommodation Rule

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will estimate the number of taxpayers who will cease to be liable for United Kingdom tax in 1994–95 following the abolition of the available accommodation rule.

    Tax Returns

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer under what circumstances he requires (a) non-domiciled and (b) non-resident people working in the United Kingdom to complete tax returns.

    An individual would be required to complete a tax return in circumstances where there is a liability to United Kingdom tax.

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer from how many people who are non-domiciled and resident or ordinarily resident in the United Kingdom the Inland Revenue collected tax returns for the latest year available.

    I regret that the information to answer this question is not available.

    Chargeable Gains

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will estimate the yield to the Exchequer for 1993–94 if section 62(1) of the Taxation of Chargeable Gains Act 1992 did not apply to assets which qualified either for business property relief within section 104 of the Inheritance Tax Act 1984 or for agricultural property relief within section 116 of the Inheritance Tax Act 1984 at the time of the person's death.

    Assuming that the normal business reliefs against capital gains tax such as holdover relief and retirement relief would be made available on death, the estimated yield from introducing a capital gains charge on death in respect of assets which qualify for business property or agricultural property relief under the inheritance tax provisions in 1993–94 is negligible.

    Worldwide Income

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will estimate the yield in 1992–93 or the latest year available of taxing non-domiciled resident of ordinarily resident people on worldwide income and capital gains.

    I regret that the information to answer this question is not available.

    Securities And Investments Board

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what is his policy on the number of public interest members of the Securities and Investments Board; and if he will make a statement.

    [holding answer 7 July 1993]: The Chairman of SIB mentioned in his review that he wished to rebalance the composition of the SIB board. My right hon. and learned Friend has accepted these proposals.

    Environment

    Home Improvements

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what details he has as to the number of each type of grant given for home improvement in each of the last 10 years; and if he will give the cash total of each grant, in each case on a constant value cash basis.

    The values of payments and the numbers of dwellings involved for each type of grant for home improvement over the period 1982 to 1992 are shown in the tables.Tables 1 and 2 cover, respectively, numbers of dwellings on which grants were paid to private owners and tenants under the Housing Act 1985 for the whole period, and numbers of grants paid under the Local Government and Housing Act 1989 for 1990 onwards.Tables 3 and 4 give the respective total values of grants paid, and tables 5 and 6 show them expressed on a constant value basis at 1982 prices.

    Table 1
    Grants paid to private owners and tenants under Housing Act 19851 2
    EnglandNumber of dwellings
    Conversion and improvementIntermediate and specialRepairsAll
    198254,73220,60028,696104,028
    198379,52927,236113,061219,826
    198483,95829,003116,146229,107
    198552,98929,01254,411136,412
    198646,99424,62941,705113,328
    198749,38319,66139,864108,908
    198848,21317,10739,983105,303
    198948,71114,02735,47998,217
    199051,03112,68825,36189,080
    199115,4774,2336,51026,220
    19922,4606467453,851
    1 The system of grants to private owners and tenants under the Housing Act 1985 ended at the end of June 1990. Although no more grants were approved after that date, payments will continue for grants approved earlier.
    2 Includes grants paid to housing associations under private owner legislation and grants to tenants in both private and public sectors.
    Table 2
    Grants paid to private owners and tenants under the Local Government and Housing Act 19891
    EnglandNumber of Grants
    199019911992
    Renovation Grants
    Mandatory25914,98629,588
    Discretionary2553,2065,157
    Disabled Facilities Grants
    Mandatory36010,79016,261
    Discretionary13180287
    HMO2 Grants
    Mandatory5361757
    Discretionary2258
    199019911992
    Common Parts Grants
    Mandatory451122
    Discretionary1727
    Minor Works Assistance3
    Mandatory6,66729,04228,969
    All
    Mandatory62826,18846,728
    Discretionary6,93532,46734,498
    1 The new system of grants under the Local Government and Housing Act 1989 came into operation from July 1990 in England and Wales, apart from Minor Works Assistance (April 1990).
    2 HMO stands for Houses in Multiple Occupation.
    3 Grants for Minor Works Assistance are discretionary.
    Table 3
    Grants paid to private owners and tenants under Housing Act 19851 2
    England£ thousands
    Conversion and improvementIntermediate and specialRepairsAll
    1982185,86742,10854,184282,159
    1983318,71265,453271,325655,490
    1984413,84083,619341,924839,383
    1985271,99686,751166,352525,099
    1986208,77172,368113,783394,921
    1987199,97754,482107,554362,013
    1988190,90846,658109,508347,074
    1989188,09239,683100,881328,656
    1990202,65534,62874,545311,828
    199191,08314,70121,004126,788
    199215,7002,5292,47320,702
    1 The system of grants to private owners and tenants under the Housing Act 1985 ended at the end of June 1990. Although no more grants were approved after that date, payments will continue for grants approved earlier.
    2 Includes grants paid to housing associations under private owner legislation and grants to tenants in both private and public sectors.
    Table 4
    Grants paid to private owners and tenants under the Local Government and Housing Act 19891
    England£ thousands
    199019911992
    Renovation Grants
    Mandatory1,144124,766289,562
    Discretionary30912,53620,829
    Disabled Facilities Grants
    Mandatory65631,91158,342
    Discretionary376241,182
    HMO2 Grants
    Mandatory292,0935,805
    Discretionary123598
    Common Parts Grants
    Mandatory16390694
    Discretionary121151
    Minor Works Assistance3
    Discretionary3,54117,11518,422
    All
    Mandatory1,845159,160354,403
    Discretionary3,88730,51941,182
    1 The new systen of grants under the Local Government and Housing Act 1989 came into operation from July 1990 in England
    and Wales, apart from Minor Works Assistance (April 1990).
    2 HMO stands for Houses in Multiple Occupation.
    3 Grants for Minor Works Assistance are discretionary.
    Table 5
    Value of grants paid under Housing Act 1985, at constant 1982 prices1, 2, 3
    England£ thousands
    Conversion and improvementIntermediate and specialRepairsAll
    1982185,86742,10854,184282,159
    1983304,87062,610259,541627,022
    1984376,97676,170311,466764,613
    1985233,64574,519142,896451,060
    1986173,43760,12094,526328,082
    1987159,49943,45485,784288,736
    1988145,12435,46883,245263,838
    1989132,65327,98771,147231,786
    1990130,59322,31548,038200,945
    199155,4508,95012,78777,187
    19929,2121,4841,45112,147
    1 The system of grants to private owners and tenants under the Housing Act 1985 ended at the end of June 1990. Although no more grants were approved after that date, payments will continue for grants approved earlier.
    2 Includes grants paid to housing associations under private owner legislation and grants to tenants in both private and public sectors.
    3 Value of grants paid converted to constant prices using the Retail Prices Index.
    Table 6
    Value of grants paid under the Local Government and Housing Act 1989, at constant 1982 prices1 2
    England£ thousands
    199019911992
    Renovation Grants
    Mandatory73775,956169,900
    Discretionary1997,63212,221
    Disabled Facilities Grants
    Mandatory42319,42734,232
    Discretionary24380694
    HMO3 Grants
    Mandatory191,2743,406
    Discretionary75351
    Common Parts Grants
    Mandatory10237407
    Discretionary7489
    Minor Works Assistance4
    Discretionary2,28210,41910,809
    All
    Mandatory1,18996,895207,945
    Discretionary2,50518,58024,163
    1 The new system of grants under the Local Government and Housing Act 1989 came into operation from July 1990 in England and Wales, apart from Minor Works Assistance (April 1990).
    2 Value of grants paid converted to constant prices using the Retail Prices Index.
    3 HMO stands for Houses in Multiple Occupation.
    4 Grants for Minor Works Assistance are discretionary.

    Urban Policy

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what proposals he has to recognise the requirement for long-term planning of urban regeneration.

    The Government will continue to encourage and sustain long-term investment to improve the quality of life in our city areas, both through existing programmes and new initiatives. Urban development corporations will continue to attract private investment, which has so far totalled £12 billion. City challenge will continue to promote lasting regeneration and encourage partnership between central and local government, the private sector and local people. The Urban Regeneration Agency will draw together the present programmes of city grant, derelict land grant and English Estates to create a new unified approach to the regeneration of land in and around urban areas. All urban areas will benefit from substantial main programme spending.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment (1) when the index of urban deprivation will now be published;(2) if he will list each of his orginal and revised estimates of the date of the publication of the index of urban deprivation; and if he will make a statement.

    We have made no formal estimates of the date of publication of the results of our analysis of 1991 census data. The precise timing will depend on the outcome of continuing consultation with the local authority associations and other bodies, and on the finalisation of indicators.

    Name of bodyPost holderPositionAnnual salary (£)First appointed to boardPresent appointment
    FromTo
    Commission for the New TownsLord FinsbergDeputy Chairman9,7901 September 19921 September 199231 August 1996
    Lord BellwinMember6,3101 April 19851 April 199331 March 1995
    Countryside CommissionEarl of SwintonMember5,0501 July 19871 July 199030 June 1993
    English NatureEarl of CranbrookChairman35,1505 November 19905 November 199031 March 1994
    Earl PeelMember6,3105 November 19901 April 199331 March 1996
    Joint Nature Conservation CommitteeLord SelborneChairman23,4354 September 19914 September 1991:31 March 1994
    National Rivers AuthorityLord CrickhowellChairman52,94510 July 198910 July 198930 June 1994
    Lord GregsonMember8,0901 July 19911 November 199231 October 1995
    Rural Development CommissionLord ShuttleworthChairman31,3601 May 19901 May 199030 April 1994
    Urban Development Corporation LeedsBaroness LockwoodMember5,03030 June 198830 June 199129 June 1994
    Urban Development Corporation London DocklandsLord CocksDeputy Chairman23,1751 November 19882 March 19921 March 1995
    Urban Development CorporationLord DormandDeputy Chairman8,59022 June 198722 June 199121 June 1993
    TeessideBaroness EcclesMember5,03022 June 198722 June 199121 June 1993

    Sellafield (Radioactive Discharges)

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what assessment he has made of the views of the Government of the Republic of Ireland on the pollution inspectorate's recommendations on the new authorisations for radioactive discharges from the Sellafield site in Cumbria.

    The views expressed by all respondents, including the Irish Government, were taken into account by the chief inspector of Her Majesty's inspectorate of pollution and the radiological inspectorates of the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food in their report on the public consultation on their proposed draft

    Quangos

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will list the former Members of this House who have been appointed since 1988 by his Department to quasi-autonomous non-governmental organisations; and if he will list in each case the title of the post, the salary, the duration of the appointment and the party which the former hon. Member represented.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will list the names of individuals who (a) are spouses of hon. Members, (b) are members of the House of Lords, (c) are spouses of members of the House of Lords and (d) have been party candidates for Parliament, indicating for which party, who have been appointed by his Department since 1988 to quasi-autonomous non-governmental organisations giving, in each case, the title of the post, any salary payable, and the duration of the appointment.

    The following members of the House of Lords are currently serving on the boards of executive non-departmental public bodies sponsored by my Department. The other information requested is not available.authorisations for British Nuclear Fuels' Sellafield site. The inspectorates' report has been carefully considered by my right hon. Friends the Secretary of State for the Environment and the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food. They intend to carry out a further round of public consultation which will include the Irish Government.

    Property Services Agency

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what is the value of the land and buildings in the ownership of the Property Services Agency.

    The value of freehold land and buildings on the PSA Services' departmental estate is estimated as £4 million.

    Radioactive Waste

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what assessment he has made of the relative effectiveness of (a) dry storage of spent AGR fuel as waste in a store such as that proposed for Torness by Scottish Nuclear or (b) reprocessing of the spent fuel as low as reasonably advisable in implementing the principle on minimising exposure to radiation.

    Dry storage of spent nuclear fuel is not to be regarded as an alternative to reprocessing but rather as a measure which enables the owners of the spent fuel to defer any decision on whether to reprocess the fuel or to dispose of it directly. Unless a decision has been taken to dispose of it directly, the spent fuel in store is not to be regarded as a waste but as a resource from which uranium and plutonium can be extracted by reprocessing. It is for the owners of the spent fuel to determine whether they wish to implement dry storage and, if so, to satisfy the planning and regulatory authorities that their proposals are acceptable.

    Environment Council

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will make a statement on the outcome of the Environment Council on 28 and 29 June.

    I and my hon. Friend the Minister for the Environment and Countryside represented the United Kingdom at the Environment Council in Luxembourg on 28 and 29 June. The Council discussed a lengthy agenda and achieved positive results.The Council adopted a common position, by qualified majority—QMV—on a directive on the control of volatile organic compound—VOC—emissions resulting from the storage of petrol and its distribution from terminals to service stations—the so-called "stage I" directive. This will control VOC emissions which contribute to the formation of ozone at ground level. Ozone is the main constituent of photochemical smog and a damaging pollutant. The directive will introduce a closed system of petrol distribution under which petrol vapours are recovered and regenerated into a petroleum product instead of being vented into the air as at present. The agreed text meets the Government's concerns, including the need to protect small service stations in rural areas; to allow the continued use of existing vapour recovery units; and to allow the continued use of measuring dipsticks for existing road tankers.The Council agreed unanimously a directive on hazardous waste incineration which sets combusion conditions and emission limits for incineration plant and other plants using hazardous waste as a fuel. The directive is an important contribution to securing incineration as an environmentally acceptable waste disposal route. The Government secured a number of important changes to the text which are intended to achieve a proper balance of costs and benefits. These relate in particular to the scope of the directive, emissions limits and the discharge of waste water. The directive will come into force for new plant two years after its publication in the Official Journal of the Communities and for existing plant three and a half years thereafter.The Council discussed two measures on vehicle emissions. Ministers agreed by QM V the text of a directive, amending directive 70/220/EEC, which will set new exhaust emission standards for light commercial vehicles below 3.5 tonnes maximum weight. The new directive will require the same catalyst technology introduced for cars in 1992 to be applied to light duty vans and trucks, and will result in a significant reduction in traffic pollution from these vehicles. The standards will come into effect in October for the approval of new types and will apply to all models sold from 1 October 1994. In the text, the Council also agreed that additional provisions should be applied in a further stage for introduction in 1996–97. Ministers also made substantial progress towards agreement on a further directive on standards for passenger car emissions. This would introduce new limits for implementation in 1996–97, and provide for further measures to be considered for the year 2000.The Council agreed unanimously that the Community and its member states intend to ratify the biodiversity convention by the end of the year. The decision to do so is dependent on achieving essential safeguards concerning the financial provisions of the convention and will be kept under reviewThe Council discussed proposed minor revisions to the annexes to the wild birds directive, but was unable to reach agreement. The issue has been referred back to the Committee of Permanent Representatives—COREPER—for further discussion, with a view to early adoption in the future.The Commission presented to the Council new proposals for the implementation in the Community of the Montreal protocol on ozone depleting substances with references to HCFCs and methyl bromide, and for Community ratification of the relevant amendments to the Montreal protocol. The Government welcomed the Commission's presentation, but will wish to consider the proposals in detail, especially as regards methyl bromide. In discussion, however, we were able to support the proposed cap on HCFC supply at 2.5 per cent. and a phase-out by 2015.The Council held a full discussion of the problems caused by the German packaging ordinance for the paper and plastics recycling industries in other member states, based on an oral report by the Commission. The majority of member states agreed that early action was necessary on a Community-wide basis. They welcomed the intention of the incoming Belgian presidency to give high priority to the proposed packaging and packaging waste directive. The Commission will be bringing forward a revised draft to take account of amendments proposed by the European Parliament.Among other matters, the Council formally adopted the regulation establishing a voluntary Community scheme on eco-management and audit; noted the good progress which had been made on the Commission's proposal for a revision of controls on the wildlife trade —the CITES regulation—and invited COREPER to take the discussion forward; adopted conclusions on follow-up to UNCED and to the conference of European Ministers for the Environment held in Lucerne in April; heard a report from the presidency on progress over the last six months on a number of proposals relating to climate change; adopted conclusions welcoming follow-up action in accordance with the Commission's communication on a "Common Policy on Safe Seas"; heard a report from the Commission on its preparations for a possible Community strategy on coastal zones; and welcomed a presentation by the Commission of new internal measures that it has introduced to improve the integration of environmental concerns into other Community policies.The Commissioner announced that the Commission had adopted criteria for the award of Community eco-labels for the first two product groups under the Community scheme—washing machines and dishwashers —and that the scheme was now in operation.

    Church Urban Fund

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what representations he has received from the Church Commissioners and the Church of England about the use of urban deprivation index to assess the appropriate level of grants from the church urban fund.

    Officials from the Department of the Environment met Church of England officials on 6 May and there have been subsequent contacts and correspondence. The Church of England has made helpful comments on our contractors' proposals for assessing urban conditions.

    Thorp

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will list his statutory responsibilities and functions under the Radioactive Substances Acts in respect of considering justification for operating a thermal oxide reprocessing plant; and if he will make a statement.

    Under section 12A of the Radioactive Substances Act 1960, my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State has power to direct the chief inspector to refuse an application for an authorisation to dispose of radioactive waste, or to direct him to grant such an authorisation subject to limitations or conditions, if any, as my right hon. Friend may specify in the direction. Under section 12B my right hon. Friend has power to require the chief inspector to refer an application to him so that he may determine it.The Act does not refer to the matters which my right hon. Friend is to take into account in considering whether, and if so how, to exercise these powers.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment when the period of consultation over the justification for operating THORP will formally begin; when it will end; and if he will make a statement.

    My right hon. Friends the Secretary of State and the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food will go out to consultation when they have the further information and material referred to in the answer given by my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State to my hon. Friend the Member for Norwich, North (Mr. Thompson) on 28 June, Official Report, column 392. The consultation period is expected to last two months.

    Water Disconnections

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment how many domestic water disconnections took place in Severn-Trent during the last 12 months and in each of the previous five years.

    The information requested is given in the table, and relates to Severn Trent Water's supply area, and that of the former Severn Trent water authority. Information on disconnections prior to privatisation includes total disconnections, domestic and non-domestic.

    Number
    1987–881932
    1988–8911,101
    1989–90985
    1990–91286
    1991–921,284
    1992–931,215
    1 Domestic and non-domestic.

    Sellafield (Radioactive Discharges)

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment when his report will be published into the incident which involved the discharge of elevated levels of radioactivity from Sellafield on 12 February.

    The report is published today by Her Majesty's Stationery Office. I have placed a copy of the report in the Library of the House.The report concludes, in particular, that the discharge occurred because a ventilation system from a cell area was unfiltered. Steps have been taken to guard against a recurrence. The radiation dose to the most exposed member of the public from the incident would not have exceeded one thousandth of the average radiation dose to such a person from natural radiation in a year in the United Kingdom. There was no contravention of the Sellafield nuclear site licence conditions or of the current authorised discharge limits for aerial discharges in connection with the incident.The regulating authorities are to audit Sellafield's facilities on the site to ensure that the possibility of a recurrence of similar incidents is minimised.

    Education

    Grant-Maintained Schools

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to his answer of 6 November, Official Report, column 513, how many grant-maintained schools folders have now been produced for the distribution of booklets; and what was the cost of (a) the production and (b) the distribution.

    A total of 210,000 folders have been produced to date, at a cost of £51,181, excluding the cost of the booklets they normally contain. The cost of distributing these folders forms part of a general charge to the Department and cannot be disaggregated.

    Young People

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education what was the total number of (a) 18-year-olds, (b) 17-year-olds and (c) 16-year-olds in January (i) 1991, (ii) 1992 and (iii) 1993; and if he will list for each year the number in full-time education in (1) school including maintained, independent and special schools and (2) further education, excluding those on youth training schemes in colleges.

    The numbers of 18, 17 and 16-year-olds in England and the numbers in full-time education are shown in the table.

    (Academic years, thousands)
    1990–911991–921992–93
    Population aged
    18678.3636.7604.9
    17634.5602.2579.4
    16599.0577.3554.8
    Pupils in full-time education in school (excluding sixth form colleges)1 aged
    1814.815.916.5
    17130.1135.3138.7
    16185.6195.3195.6
    Students in full-time further education (including sixth form colleges but excluding those on youth training schemes in colleges)1 aged
    1867.277.889.2
    17136.2152.9174.2
    16161.7180.7193.1
    1 The figures for 1992–93 are provisional estimates based on partially processed returns from schools and colleges.

    Vocational Qualifications

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will make a statement about the new general national vocational qualifications.

    I have today announced that the three levels of GNVQ should in future be known by names rather than numbers:

    • "Advanced" for Level 3,
    • "Intermediate" for Level 2, and
    • "Foundation" for Level 1.
    "Advanced" GNVQs—or "vocational A Levels" will help pupils, students, parents, teachers, higher education and employers to understand that these GNVQs require a level of achievement equivalent to two GCE A-Levels.

    Bradford City Technology College

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what total financial assistance has been given to Bradford city technology college, to date, by (a) the private sector and (b) the public sector; how much will be given to the college by each sector in each of the next three years; and if he will make a statement;(2) if he will list the names of all persons, companies or other organisations in the private sector who, to date, have given financial assistance to Bradford city technology college to support its capital or revenue expenditure; and if he will list the names of all persons, companies or other organisations in the private sector who have indicated their intention to offer financial assistance to the college over the next three years.

    The initial capital cost of establishing Bradford city technology college totalled £9.16 million of which the Department for Education contributed £7.33 million and sponsors £1.83 million. The major sponsors were: Dixons Group plc, Mr. H. Wong and Kodak plc.The directors of the college are committed under the terms of their funding agreement with the Secretary of State to provide a minimum of 20 per cent. of any further capital expenditure. Revenue expenditure of CTCs is met from recurrent grant provided by the Secretary of State. As with other schools, individuals and organisations make voluntary contributions from time to time; these are matters for the directors of the college concerned.

    Foreign And Commonwealth Affairs

    Baltimar Zephyr

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, pursuant to his answer to the hon. Member for Sunderland, South (Mr. Mullin) of 16 June, Official Report, columns 644–45, what information he has on whether the Indonesian Government have tried any crew members of the Baltimar Zephyr for mutiny.

    We are not aware that any crew members of the Baltimar Zephyr have been tried for mutiny.

    Yugoslavia

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what assessment he has made of the extent of mobilisation of Bosnian-Croat citizens in Bosnia-Herzegovina on 30 June; what action he plans in the event of fighting by these forces: if he will bring forward plans to impose economic and diplomatic sanctions against the Republic of Croatia; and if he will make a statement.

    We are aware of reports that all three parties in the conflict in Bosnia are taking further steps to mobilise their citizens. We are pressing all parties to stop fighting and to support the peace process. We are also pressing the Croatian Government to co-operate fully in this. Croatia was put on notice by the 8 June meeting of EC Foreign Ministers that restrictive measures would he initiated against it if the situation so required.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how many times representatives of Her Majesty's Government have met President Franjo Tudjman of Croatia since January 1991; and what was the purpose of each meeting.

    Representatives of Her Majesty's Government have met President Tudjman and his staff on numerous occasions since January 1991, most recently on 30 May when Her Majesty's ambassador in Zagreb met the President. The main purpose of our representations on this and previous occasions has been to press President Tudjman to co-operate fully with the efforts of the international community to achieve lasting and equitable settlements to the conflict in Bosnia, based on the principles established by the London conference, and to urge restraint in trying to restore Croatian sovereignty in the Serb-occupied Krajinas.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how many times representatives of Her Majesty's Government have met President Izetbegovic of Bosnia-Herzegovina since January 1991; and what was the purpose of each meeting.

    Representatives of Her Majesty's Government have met President Izetbegovic and his staff on numerous occasions since January 1991, most recently on 14 June 1993 when he visited London for talks with my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs. The main issues raised by President Izetbegovic were the arms embargo on the former Yugoslavia and the fighting in central Bosnia. My right hon. Friend set out British policies and encouraged President Izetbegovic to engage in negotiations to achieve a lasting and equitable settlement to the conflict in Bosnia, based on the principles of the London conference.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, pursuant to his answer to the hon. Member for Inverness, Nairn and Lochaber (Sir R. Johnston) of 14, April, Official Report, column 581, what assessment he has made of the relation between that answer, his answer to that hon. Member in the Official Report, column 580 and information contained in United Nations Security Council note verbale, dated 16 March 1993, Ref. S/24900/Add. 27; on what basis the assumption was made that aircraft crossing the borders of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia into Bosnia-Herzegovina were flown by Bosnian Serbs; and what subsequent information he has received about the incident.

    The information referred to in the written answer given on 14 April to the hon. Member for Inverness, Nairn and Lochaber by my right hon. Friend the then Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs is contained in note verbale S/24900/Add. 30 of 26 March from the United Nations Secretary-General to the president of the Security Council. The aircraft observed at Gladovici on 13 March were seen to withdraw towards the Bosnian/Serbian border following the incident, but have not been definitively attributed to any party.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what plans he has to urge the Security Council to defer decisions on actions in the former Yugoslavia until reliable evidence is available on which to make decisions.

    In taking decisions on the former Yugoslavia, as on other areas of the world where there is a need to maintain international peace and security, Security Council members take account of the views of the United Nations Secretary-General as set out in his reports, as well as their own knowledge and assessment of a situation.

    Piracy

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if Her Majesty's Government will make representations to the Government of Indonesia for them to undertake to set up a full investigation of all acts of piracy and murder in Indonesian waters.

    Her Majesty's embassy in Jakarta has on a number of occasions raised with the Indonesians the issue of attacks at sea. My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs raised the subject during his visit there in April.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will hold talks with the Association of South-East Asian Nations about the establishment of multilateral agreements by their member states towards the prevention of piracy in the region.

    There are no current plans for talks on piracy with ASEAN. The International Maritime organisation is the best forum in which to address this issue. The IMO has recently produced a report covering piracy in south-east Asia.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will hold talks with ASEAN about providing intelligence data relating to piracy and safety to merchant vessels travelling on the seas of that region.

    The International Maritime Organisation is responsible for collating and disseminating information relating to attacks on shipping in the ASEAN region and elsewhere.

    Iran

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what representations he has made, directly to the Government of Iran, or at the United Nations, concerning violation of women's human rights in Iran.

    We are concerned about all human rights abuses in Iran, including those against women. We regularly underline our concerns to the Iranians, both bilaterally and with our EC partners. The latest report of the United Nations Secretary-General's special representative on human rights in Iran includes information about the situation of women in Iran. We and our EC partners co-sponsored the resolution adopted by the United Nations Commission on Human Rights on 10 March reflecting the special representative's concerns.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs whether the Government of Iran have sought to impose restrictions on the dress of female United Kingdom diplomatic personnel in Iran; and if he will make a statement.

    The Islamic dress code has to be observed in public by all women in Iran, including female foreign diplomats.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what representations he has received in respect of Iranian attacks upon People's Mojahedin bases in Iraq; what his response has been; if he regards such attacks as being in contravention of Security Council resolution 598; what action Her Majesty's Government are taking on this matter; and if he will make a statement.

    We have received a number of representations about the air raids carried out by Iran on 25 May inside Iraq. The possible contravention of UN Security Council resolution 598 is a matter for the Security Council which is permanently seized of this issue. We have expressed our serious concern at these air raids to the Iranian authorities.

    Cyprus

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement on extradition arrangements between the United Kingdom and Cyprus.

    Until 1990, extradition between the United Kingdom and the Republic of Cyprus was possible under the Commonwealth scheme for the rendition of fugitive offenders. Since 1990, extradition arrangements with the Republic of Cyprus are under the Extradition Act 1989 and the European convention on extradition.

    Murders (Holidaymakers)

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how many United Kingdom citizens have been murdered on overseas holidays in each year since 1985; and if he will list the countries the murders occurred in.

    The number of United Kingdom citizens murdered abroad since 1985, and reported to the FCO, is as follows:

    Numbers
    198518
    198626
    198745
    198855
    198939
    199050
    199149
    199251
    1993127
    1 First six months.
    Murders took place in 75 countries, as shown in the list. FCO records do not distinguish between holidaymakers, business people and residents abroad.

    AfghanistanIreland
    AntiguaIsrael
    ArgentinaItaly
    AustraliaJamaica
    BahamasJerusalem
    BelgiumKenya
    BelizeLebanon
    BermudaLiberia
    BoliviaMalawi
    BrazilMalta
    British Virgin IslandsMexico
    CanadaMorocco
    Canary IslandsMozambique
    Caymen IslandsNetherlands
    ColombiaNew Zealand
    CyprusNigeria
    CzechoslovakiaPakistan
    DenmarkPapua New Guinea
    DjiboutiPeru
    Dominican RepublicPhilippines
    EgyptPortugal
    El SalvadorSaudi Arabia
    FranceSomalia
    GambiaSouth Africa
    GermanySpain
    GhanaSt. Lucia
    GreeceSt. Maarten (Netherland Antilles)
    Guatemala
    GuyanaSudan
    HondurasSwaziland
    IndiaSweden
    IndonesiaSwitzerland
    IraqTanzania
    ThailandVenezuela
    TurkeyYugoslavia (Belgrade)
    TunisiaZaire
    TogoZimbabwe
    USA
    Uganda

    Iraq

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, further to his statement of 28 June, Official Report, column 657, what independent evidence he sought about the competence as saboteurs of the alleged conspirators against ex-President Bush before coming to his conclusion that the United States response was justified and proportionate.

    The United States have made it clear that they had evidence of Iraqi intelligence involvement in the attempt on the life of ex-President Bush in Kuwait. The United States briefed the Security Council about the evidence on 27 June.

    Belize

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what plans he has to discuss future Central American and Caribbean issues with the new Prime Minister of Belize; and if he will make a statement.

    My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs has no such plans, but Her Majesty's high commissioner in Belmopan, who is in regular touch with the Belize authorities on a wide range of issues, called on the new Prime Minister shortly after the recent election.

    Northern Ireland

    Irish Language

    To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland (1) which experts in Irish-medium education advised the Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education on the appropriateness of the courses in subject application, education and professional studies in the BEd degree at St. Mary's college, Belfast and in the PGCE course at Queen's university, Belfast to the needs of teachers of Irish in Irish-medium primary and secondary schools in Northern Ireland and of his Department;(2) what action his Department intends to take in relation to the training of teachers of the Irish language;(3) if the written advice of the Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education is available to the public;(4) what criteria were adopted by the Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education in determining the appropriateness of courses in subject application, education and professional studies in the BEd degree at St. Mary's college, Belfast and in the PGCE course at the Queen's university of Belfast to the needs of teachers of Irish in Irish-medium primary and secondary schools in Northern Ireland;(5) who are the experts in (i) the teaching of Irish and (ii) modern language teaching methodology who advised the Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education on the appropriateness of the course in Celtic for the BEd degree at St. Mary's college, Belfast to the needs of student teachers of Irish in Northern Ireland and of his Department;(6) what criteria were adopted by the Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education in determining whether the Celtic course in the BEd degree at St. Mary's college, Belfast is suitable for the needs of student teachers of Irish in Northern Ireland.

    As a precondition of approval by the Department of Education, courses of initial teacher training—ITT—in Northern Ireland are considered by the Council for the Accreditation of the Teacher Education —CATE—and required to meet certain defined Government criteria. The form and nature of these criteria are currently set out in the Department's circular 1989/40 "Initial Teacher Training Approval of Courses" which replaced circular 1985/20. Bachelor of education courses at St. Mary's college of education and post-graduate certificate of education courses at St. Mary's and Queen's university, with a main subject option of Celtic which student teachers of Irish undertake, were considered against Government criteria set out in circular 1985/20 and were approved as suitable courses of teacher training in December 1989. To help CATE in its work, all ITT institutions in Northern Ireland were visited and reported on by the Department's inspectorate. Circulars 1985/20 and 1989/40 are in the public domain, but the advice given by CATE to the Department in respect of courses at individual institutions is confidential. A review of ITT in Northern Ireland is currently under way. Developments emanating from this review are likely to affect the mode and content of all ITT courses; include an increase in school-based initial teacher training and a clearer definition of the competences which successful teachers would be expected to have as they progress through initial teacher training, induction and the more advanced stages of their careers. After a period of consultation, any changes resulting from the review will be announced later this year.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will give details of the nature and scope of research into the teaching of Irish carried out by the staff of St. Mary's college and of the department and school of education of the Queen's university of Belfast since 1980.

    The emphasis in recent years has not been on research into the teaching of modern languages, including Irish, but on the provision of professional support and production of learning materials for use in the classroom. St. Mary's college of education, in conjunction with my Department and the education and library boards, has been actively involved in this area. One notable result has been the production of a graded reading scheme for children learning to read through the medium of Irish.At Queen's university, research into the teaching of Irish has been part of on-going research into the teaching of modern languages.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many times inspectors from his Department have furnished him and his predecessors with reports on the teaching of Irish in higher education in the past 20 years; and what arrangements exist to make these reports available to the public.

    There has been one substantive report on the teaching of Irish in St. Mary's college of education, which formed part of a general inspection of the college in 1987.This report was not a published document. It was supplied in confidence to the college authorities and to the Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education.

    Structural Funds

    To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland when the consultative draft of the "Northern Ireland Structural Funds Plan 1994 to 1999" was issued for consultation; and when he will make it available to right hon. and hon. Members elected for Northern Ireland constituencies.

    The Department of Finance and Personnel circulated a consultation draft of the key sections of the "Northern Ireland Structural Funds Plan 1994 to 1999" to local interest groups on 25 June 1993. The closing date for the receipt of comments is 31 August. The interest generated in the draft plan has been much greater than anticipated with over 700 copies issued so far. Copies have already been issued to the Northern Ireland MEPs and main political party leaders, but I welcome the right hon. Gentleman's interest in the draft plan and would, of course, be pleased to send a copy to any of the Members elected for Northern Ireland constituencies if they request it.

    Water Main, Ballygowan

    To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland when he first received a complaint about a burst water main opposite 21–23 Saintfield road, Ballygowan; on what date the water main was repaired; why the water service was unable to repair the mains earlier; what is the estimated total loss of water in gallons; and if he will make a statement.

    The Department of the Environment was notified on 21 June 1993 about a leaking hydrant opposite 21–23 Saintfield road, Ballygowan, and the repair was carried out on 1 July. During the period from 21 June to 1 July there were six burst mains, 25 burst service pipes and 16 leaking valves in the area requiring urgent repair as they were causing loss of water pressure and supply to consumers; the leaking hydrant was causing neither. It was not seen as a hazard to vehicular or pedestrian traffic and the other repairs were given priority. The estimated loss of water was 72,000 gallons.

    Homeless Young People

    To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what help is given to those young people from Northern Ireland who find themselves homeless in Britain and wish to return to Northern Ireland.

    The Northern Ireland Housing Executive has a statutory duty to respond to those persons who are homeless in Northern Ireland. Young people who are homeless in Britain do not come within its responsibility until they arrive in Northern Ireland.

    Road Safety, Ballygowan

    To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what representations he has received about road safety on the main Belfast road, Ballygowan in the vicinity of the bus stop near Ballygowan Pharmacy, 15 The Square, Ballygowan; what consideration he has given to the provision of a pedestrian crossing at this location across the main Belfast road to unit 6; and if he will make a statement.

    In the past six years, two requests have been received for the provision of a pedestrian crossing at this location. A survey will be carried out in September to determine whether a pedestrian crossing is needed.

    Young Migrants

    To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what financial support is given to housing associations in Northern Ireland who wish to work specifically in advice and support to young people wishing to migrate to other parts of the United Kingdom.

    None. In 1989–90, however, the Department of Health and Social Services grant aided the production of a leaflet "Second Thoughts—A Closer Look at Emigrating to London" which was jointly produced by a number of organisations, including one registered housing association. A copy of the leaflet will be placed in the Library.A further grant has been made available to produce an updated version of the leaflet, which is expected to be available in the autumn.

    Industrial Development Board

    To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what lists are held by the IDB of architects, quantity surveyors, mechanical and electrical contractors and structural engineers for engagement in design teams for capital projects or invitations to tender; and how such lists are compiled and reviewed.

    The IDB holds separate lists of architects; quantity surveyors; mechanical and electrical engineers; and civil and structural engineers. These lists are compiled on the basis of practice information supplied by applicant firms. The lists are not reviewed as it is the responsibility of applicant firms to update the practice information supplied to the IDB.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will provide a list of IDB construction contracts for the last four years indicating the total value of each contract, the names of firms in the respective design teams, the names of contractor firms and the names of those invited to tender.

    The information requested is being compiled and will be placed in the Library in due course.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will make a statement regarding the IDB's use of consultants in capital projects indicating whether they are appointed by rota, by free bid, by client preference or IDB preferences.

    The IDB assesses and selects professional practices for appointment as design consultants in capital projects. The assessment is based on the practice information submitted to it by firms seeking inclusion in IDB's select lists. Selection for particular projects is based on professional expertise, past performance, and the availability of resources to cope with the scale of design work within the project timescale. Account is taken also of any views stated by the IDB client company for whom the project is being built. There is no rota system, but the IDB does seek to spread work among consultants. Whenever possible, preference is given to local professional practices capable of undertaking the work.From 1 July 1993, the procurement of professional services will be governed by EC legislation as contained in the Public Services Contracts Regulations 1993.

    Emergency Provisions Act

    To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will make a statement about the exercise of the powers contained in section 57 of and schedule 5 to the Northern Ireland (Emergency Provisions) Act 1991.

    During 1992, I received 24 applications from the Royal Ulster Constabulary for the appointment of persons to exercise the powers conferred by schedule 5 to the 1991 Act.The following statistics indicate the extent of the use of these powers during the 1992 calendar year.

    Number
    (a) number of applications for appointment124
    (b) number of appointments made123
    (c) number of notices to attend issued130
    (d) number of interviews conducted123
    (e) number of search warrants obtained10
    (f) number of persons charged with Schedule 5 offences11
    (g) number of persons convicted of Schedule 5 offences11
    (h) number of search warrants or orders obtained20
    (i) number of production orders obtained20
    (j) number of explanation orders obtained20
    1 Under the Northern Ireland (Emergency Provisions) act 1991.
    2 Under the Prevention of Terrorism (Temporary Provisions) Act 1989.
    I am satisfied that the powers have been used to good effect and that they are extremely useful in the continuing efforts to disrupt and curtail terrorist fund raising and to bring offenders to justice.

    Bus Services

    To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what progresss has been made towards implementation of the recommendations contained in the Monopolies and Mergers Commission's report of June 1989 on the bus services in Northern Ireland provided by Ulsterbus Ltd. and Citybus Ltd.; and if he will make a statement.

    I have today placed in the Library of the House, the third and final response to the report which has been prepared by the Department of the Environment for Northern Ireland in consultation with the bus companies and the Northern Ireland Transport Holding Company. I am glad to confirm that good progress has been made on the implementation of the Monopolies and Mergers Commission's recommendations since this matter was last reported to the House in March 1991. The response now indicates that 42 of the 58 recommendations made by the MMC have been implemented in full and that the remaining 16 recommendations have been accepted and their implementation is continuing.I am pleased to inform the House that research published recently by the General Consumer Council for Northern Ireland has shown that there has been a significant improvement in services provided by the bus companies since the council carried out similar research in 1987. This reflects in some measure the steps taken by companies in response to the MMC recommendations and the oversight of their implementation by the Transport Holding Company and the Department. In February 1993, the companies fulfilled the commitment in the Northern Ireland citizens charter by publishing their bus passengers charter. I am confident that the companies will meet the targets it sets for standards and quality of service and that, over time, will strive to improve standards even further, achieve better value for money and, in consultation with their customers, provide greater choice and a better and more attractive service which the public are entitled to expect.

    Industrial Electricity

    To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if the transitional relief to monthly billed industrial electricity consumers in Northern Ireland, announced by him on 25 March, is in place; and if he will make a statement.

    Yes. Transitional relief in the form of rebates on electricity bills, will be paid to about 3,800 monthly billed industrial and commercial customers. This will enable the tariff increase for those customers, which took effect from 1 April 1993, to be reduced from an average of 15 per cent. to 9 per cent. The relief will be paid out of a trust fund of £12.9 million which has been established and funded out of the dividend of £16.5 million declared by NIE in respect of the year to 31 March 1993. A subsidiary company of Northern Ireland Electricity plc will act as trustee. These arrangements have been notified to and cleared by the European Commission.

    Public Bodies

    To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland to whom each of the executive non-departmental public bodies sponsored by the Northern Ireland Office is responsible; whether the public bodies or their members in each case are subject to (a) surcharge, (b) investigation by the Parliamentary Commissioner, (c) scrutiny by the Audit Commission or National Audit Office, (d) the statutory provisions for open government which apply to local authorities, (e) performance indicators and (f) provisions under the citizens charters; and whether the chairpersons and members of the boards of each of these bodies are required to declare an interest.

    [holding answer 6 July 1993]:Available information can be obtained from the following publications, copies of which are held in the Library.

  • (i) "Public Bodies 1992" lists the executive non-departmental public bodies sponsored by the Northern Ireland Office and Northern Ireland Departments and includes the audit arrangements for each executive non-departmental public body.
  • The responsibilities of the Audit Commission or National Audit Office do not extend to the six Northern Ireland Departments, which have their own similarly appointed body—the Northern Ireland Audit Office.
  • (ii) The Northern Ireland Commissioner for Complaints is responsible for undertaking the investigation of complaints against non-departmental public bodies. The Commissioner for Complaints (Northern Ireland) Act 1969 and the "Statutes Revised (2nd edition) Cumulative Supplement" list the non-departmental public bodies subject to investigation by the Northern Ireland Commissioner for Complaints.
  • All public servants are subject to the citizens charter and non-departmental public bodies are therefore encouraged through their sponsor Departments to adopt charter principles.The other information requested is not held centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate costs.

    National Heritage

    School Drama Departments

    To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage how many school drama departments he has visited in his official capacity.

    Although invitations to school drama departments are more likely to go to Ministers in the Department for Education, I visited the Guildhall School of Music and Drama on 3 March.

    Theatre In Education

    To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage how many representations he has received regarding the future of theatre in education provision.

    Since the start of the current campaign on behalf of theatre in education, I have received more than 30 such representations.

    To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage what consultation he has had with (a) the Arts Council of Great Britain, (b) the regional arts boards, (c) the Department for Education and (d) local authority associations regarding the future of theatre in education provision.