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Family Reunification

Volume 228: debated on Thursday 8 July 1993

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To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department in what ways United Kingdom legislation will have to be changed to implement the resolution on family reunification adopted by the Ministers responsible for immigration at their meeting in Copenhagen on 1 and 2 June; and what cost implications this will have.

There will be no need to amend primary legislation to implement the resolution on family reunification.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list the international conventions and fundamental provisions in national legislation which the Ministers responsible for immigration indicated would be taken into account in their resolution on family reunification at their meeting in Copenhagen on 1 and 2 June; and which of these obligations are relevant to the implementation of this resolution in United Kingdom law.

It is not possible to provide an exhaustive list of all the international conventions which the United Kingdom has ratified or the provisions in domestic legislation which might be relevant. However, the following are likely to be applicable:

International Conventions
  • (a) The United Nations Convention on Human Rights;
  • (b) The European Convention on Human Rights;
  • (c) The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child;
  • (d) The European Convention on the Adoption of Children;
  • (e) The United Nations Convention on Refugees.
  • 2. Domestic legislation
  • (a) The Immigration Act, 1971;
  • (b) The Marriage Act, 1949;
  • (c) The Children Act, 1989;
  • (d) The Adoption Act, 1976, together with the equivalent Act and Order for Scotland and Northern Ireland;
  • (e) The Family Law Reform Act, 1987.