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Written Answers

Volume 229: debated on Tuesday 27 July 1993

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Written Answers To Questions

Tuesday 27 July 1993

Lord Chancellor's Department

Inquests

To ask the Parliamentary Secretary, Lord Chancellor's Department what action will be taken to ensure that the operation of the inquest system is expedited.

Under the present inquest procedures in Northern Ireland, decisions about the commencement, adjournment and timing of a particular inquest are matters largely for the coroner tasked with responsibility for the conduct of the inquest. The Government are satisfied that those arrangements are right in principle, because the coroner is in the best position to judge these matters based on his knowledge of all the circumstances of the case. In a small minority of cases, there is a degree of unavoidable delay due to a range of factors, such as the complexity of the circumstances giving rise to the death; the necessary time taken by the authorities fully to investigate the circumstances of the death, to make proper decisions about criminal prosecutions, and to bring appropriate cases to trial; and legal challenges to coroners' decisions made in the higher courts by the next-of-kin of the deceased or other interested parties. The Government are conscious, as are the coroners and all those involved in the inquest system, of the need to ensure that delays in the holding of inquests are kept to a minimum. The Government believe, nevertheless, that the present arrangements generally work well in practice and do not propose any action at this time.

Computer Consultancies

To ask the Parliamentary Secretary, Lord Chancellor's Department if he will list all the computer consultancies employed by his Department, since November 1991, the tasks for which they were engaged, and the total cost to his Department.

Between 1 November 1991 and 30 June 1993, the Lord Chancellor's Department has awarded contracts for information technology services to 38 companies. The total cost of these contracts is £2,182,473.Information about the companies to whom contracts were awarded is commercial in confidence and may not be revealed.

To ask the Parliamentary Secretary, Lord Chancellor's Department if he will list all the computer consultancies employed by the Land Registry, since November 1991, the tasks for which they were engaged, and the total cost to his Department.

The hon. Member's question concerns a specific matter on which the chief executive of Her Majesty's Land Registry is best placed to provide an answer and I have accordingly asked the chief executive to reply direct.

Letter from John Manthorpe to Mr. John McAllion, dated 26 July 1993:

Parliamentary question No. 93/480 computer consultancies employed by HM Land Registry
As Chief Executive it is my responsibility to answer questions on operational matters concerning HM Land Registry. Consequently, the Parliamentary Secretary, Lord Chancellor's Department, has asked me to reply to your Parliamentary Question to him concerning the use of computer consultants.
In reply to your question, I can confirm that no computer consultancies have been employed by HM Land Registry since November 1991.
I hope you find this reply helpful. A copy will appear in the Official Report and a copy will be placed in the House library.

Data Processing

To ask the Parliamentary Secretary, Lord Chancellor's Department if he will list the numbers of staff by grade that are employed in his Department in the automatic data processing functional specialism.

The following numbers of staff are employed on work which qualifies them to receive the automatic data processing allowance.

Number of staff
SEO37
HEO92
EO121
AO41
AA22

To ask the Parliamentary Secretary, Lord Chancellor's Department if he will list the numbers of staff by grade that are employed in the Land Registry in the automatic data processing functional specialism.

The hon. Member's question concerns a specific matter on which the chief executive of Her Majesty's Land Registry is best placed to provide an answer and I have accordingly asked the chief executive to reply direct.

Letter from John Marthorpe to Mr. John McAllion, dated 26 July 1993:

Parliamentary Question No. 93/481

Land Registry staff in the ADP functional specialism

As Chief Executive it is my responsibility to answer questions on operational matters concerning HM Land Registry. Consequently, the Parliamentary Secretary, Lord Chancellor's Department, has asked me to reply to your Parliamentary Question to him concerning the staff we employ in the automatic data processing (IT) functional specialism.

I have set out below the staff in post figures (full time equivalents) for HM Land Registry staff currently employed in the Civil Service's Information Technology Functional Specialism.

Grade

Number

SEO23
HEO52
EO85

I hope you find this reply helpful. A copy will appear in the Official Report and a copy will be placed in the House library.

Small Businesses

To ask the Parliamentary Secretary, Lord Chancellor's Department if he will make a statement on the achievements of (a) his policies and (b) his Department in helping small businesses over the last 12 months as against the previous 12 months; and if he will publish the performance indicators by which his Department monitors those achievements and the statistical results of such monitoring.

The Government continue to help small businesses, through improvements to the business climate, through deregulation and through specific programmes of support and assistance.

Contracting Out

To ask the Parliamentary Secretary, Lord Chancellor's Department if he will list all those services or functions contracted out in his Department, since November 1991, in which the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations 1988 were not applied.

Whether or not TUPE applies in any particular case will depend on the nature of the work awarded and the contractor's own proposals for carrying out this work. Since November 1991, the Lord Chancellor's Department has completed market tests for the professional services required to manage its accommodation and development of new court buildings, and the internal audit function. None of these services or functions has attracted TUPE. A list of services and functions contracted out outside the Department's market testing programme is not readily available and can be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

To ask the Parliamentary Secretary, Lord Chancellor's Department if he will list all those services or functions contracted out in the Land Registry, since November 1991, in which the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations 1988 were not applied.

The hon. Member's question concerns a specific matter on which the chief executive of Her Majesty's Land Registry is best placed to provide an answer and I have accordingly asked the chief executive to reply direct.

Letter from John Manthorpe to Mr. John McAllion, dated 26 July 1993:

As Chief Executive it is my responsibility to answer questions on operational matters concerning HM Land Registry. Consequently, the Parliamentary Secretary, Lord Chancellor's Department, has asked me to reply to your Parliamentary Question to him concerning contracted out services in HM Land Registry.
Since November 1991, there have been no services or functions carried out by Land Registry staff which have been contracted out. Market Testing exercises are currently being carried out in which the TUPE regulations may apply once the successful bid has been identified.
I hope you find this reply helpful. A copy will appear in the Official Report and a copy will be placed in the House Library.

Magistrates Courts

To ask the Parliamentary Secretary, Lord Chancellor's Department what conclusions he has reached about the amalgamation of magistrates' courts committees outside Greater London.

The White Paper "A New Framework for Local Justice", published in February 1992, announced our intention of reducing the number of magistrates' courts committee areas from the present 105 to 50 to 60 in due course. In the light of extensive consultation with magistrates' courts committees and others in the magistrates' courts service, the Lord Chancellor has concluded that the following magistrates' courts committees outside Greater London should be amalgamated:

  • Manchester City, Tameside, Oldham and Stockport;
  • Trafford, Salford, Wigan, Bury, Rochdale and Bolton;
  • Knowsley, Liverpool, St. Helens, Sefton and Wirral;
  • Birmingham, Coventry and Solihull;
  • Dudley, Sandwell, Walsall and Wolverhampton;
  • Newcastle Upon Tyne, North Tyneside and Northumberland;
  • Gateshead, South Tyneside and Sunderland;
  • Leeds and Wakefield;
  • Bradford, Calderdale and Kirklees:
  • Sheffield, Barnsley, Doncaster and Rotherham;
  • Avon and Somerset;
  • Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire;
  • Hereford and Worcester and Shropshire;
  • Hampshire and the Isle of Wight;
  • Devon and Cornwall;
  • Warwickshire and Staffordshire.
In Wales, the new magistrates' courts committee areas will cover the following unitary authority areas:

  • Anglesey, Caernarfonshire and Merionethshire, Aberconwy and Colwyn, Denbighshire, Flintshire and Wrexham;
  • Powys, Pembrokeshire, Cardiganshire and Carmarthenshire;
  • Swansea, West Glamorgan and Bridgend;
  • Vale of Glamorgan, Glamorgan Valleys and Cardiff;
  • Heads of the Valleys, Caerphilly, Torfaen, Newport and Monmouthshire.

These amalgamations can be brought into effect only by an order made by the Lord Chancellor. At present, such an order can be made only on the application of the local magistrates. Legislation will be introduced at the earliest opportunity to enable the Lord Chancellor to make such an order. Before making any order amalgamating magistrates' courts committee areas, the Lord Chancellor will take into account the views of those affected. No order will be made without an opportunity for those locally to make representations. The Lord Chancellor will therefore require local consultation to have taken place, and views reported to him, when considering whether an order should be made.

All other committee areas outside London should remain organised as they are at present. The Lord Chancellor will announce his decisions about the future organisation of the magistrates' courts service in London separately.

Legal Aid

To ask the Parliamentary Secretary, Lord Chancellor's Department what was the cost of legal aid for immigration cases in each of the last five years.

The only immigration cases for which civil legal aid is available are judicial review proceedings. It is not possible to provide separate expenditure figures for judicial review proceedings involving immigration cases. Green form advice is, however, available for immigration and nationality matters and gross expenditure in each of the last five years on those matters was as follows:

£000's
1988–89782
1989–901,682
1990–912,653
1991–925,018
1992–937,248

Prime Minister

Engagements

To ask the Prime Minister if he will list his official engagements for Tuesday 27 July.

To ask the Prime Minister if he will list his official engagements for Tuesday 27 July.

This morning, I had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others, and I shall be having further meetings later today.

Iraq (Sanctions)

To ask the Prime Minister what action has been taken as a result of a meeting on 22 June, arranged by him, between the Under-Secretary at the Foreign Office, Sir Michael Burton, and the hon. Member for Linlithgow, on the effect of sanctions on the health, infant mortality and economy of Iraq.

Since the meeting referred to, £1 million has been transferred through the UN escrow account for purchasing part of the crop grown in northern Iraq to help feed the local population. We have also agreed to finance a programme of water and sanitation work in schools in the south. Emergency relief is to be provided to people fleeing repression in the south.

No 10 Downing Street

To ask the Prime Minister what income was received from the use of No. 10 Downing street for non-official functions in the last three financial years.

The costs of catering staff and other expenses are met directly by the organisers of such events. No charge is made for the use of 10 Downing street.

To ask the Prime Minister if he will list the non-official or party receptions or functions at 10 Downing street during the coming 12 months for which permission has been given.

I am not prepared to give advance notice of functions at 10 Downing street, whether official or non-official.

Desert Storm Syndrome

To ask the Prime Minister if he will discuss Desert Storm Syndrome when he meets the French President on 26 July.

Scott Inquiry

To ask the Prime Minister if he will list the witnesses who have appeared to date before the Scott inquiry; what is the total cost incurred to date by Her Majesty's Government in providing documents, witnesses and support services for the Scott inquiry; and what allocation of resources has been made for future activities of the inquiry.

To date, the following have given oral evidence in open session to Lord Justice Scott's inquiry:

Ministers/former Ministers

  • Sir Richard Luce
  • Sir Adam Butler
  • Paul Channon Esq.
  • Sir Patrick Mayhew

Government officials/former Government officials

  • S. P. Day Esq.
  • D. Q. Bryars Esq.
  • J. M. Hart Esq.
  • C. T. Sandars Esq.
  • Lt. Col. R. Glazebrook
  • A. S. Collins Esq.
  • Sir Stephen Egerton
  • W. C. Patey Esq.
  • R. Fellgett Esq.
  • P. W. M. Vereker Esq.
  • M. Higson Esq.
  • Sir David Miers

Non-Government

  • Sir Hal Miller
  • D. James Esq.

In addition, nine witnesses have given oral evidence in closed session.

The records of the Department of Trade and Industry show that the total amount charged by the inquiry to that Department for the provision of support services—permanent costs of most staff, equipment, and other general administrative costs—up to 23 July 1993 is £310,000. The cost to Government Departments of providing to the inquiry documents and witnesses requested is not held centrally and could be given only at disproportionate cost.

Specific allocation of resources for the future activities of the inquiry has not been made.

Thailand (Drug Smugglers)

To ask the Prime Minister what representations he made to secure the release from gaol in Thailand of two women convicted of drug smuggling; what is the policy of Her Majesty's Government with regard to seeking the release of United Kingdom citizens detained abroad for drugs offences; and if he will make a statement.

Duchy Of Lancaster

Open Government

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how his proposals in relation to access to personal information as described in the White Paper on open government differ from those proposed in the data protection directive—COM. (92) 422; and if he will make a statement.

The White Paper on open government proposes a clear and effective free-standing right for people to have access to personal information held about them by a wide range of public authorities. It complements the right of access to computerised data provided by the Data Protection Act 1984. The subject of access provisions in the draft directive on data protection are only one part of an elaborate structure for the control of personal data, whether held on computer or otherwise, in all sectors.

Public Bodies

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how many appointments to public bodies since April 1992 have been advertised; and if he will list them by Department.

ConsultantAssignment
Amtec ConsultingTo specify and set up Communication link
Amtec ConsultingNetwork consultancy
Amtec ConsultingSystem administration support
CCTAIT Strategy Scoping Study
Computer AnswersDatabase conversion and installation
CSC EuropeTutor input (four consultancies)
Daton Systems Ltd.Integrated Accounting, Statistical and Management Information System
David BestTutor input
Direct TechnologyAutomator (QA) package to test on line main frame systems (two consultancies)
DSSDevelopment of database system
Eider Computers Ltd.Rewrite and enhance Oracle databases in MAGIC
Eider ComputersDevelop new database
Eider ComputersDatabase design and installation
Eider ComputersDatabase conversion and installation
Eider ComputersDatabase conversion and installation
Eider ComputersDatabase design and installation
Gamma Secure SystemsSystem security profiles
GreshamImplementation of new job Assembly automation system
ICLPerformance monitoring
ICLPerformance consultancy
ICLEnhancement of Office Power system
ICLIS Strategy and Networking
IngresDatabase Implementation
LBMSNovell Netware installation for SSE
Magic Software EnterprisesAnnual on-site consultancy for MAGIC software
PC Security Ltd.Enhancements to access control software
RollstestNetwork consultancy
Sandra SkempMaintenance, development and modification of software (two consultancies)
Sapphire ASCSetting up and implementation of Management Accounting System (four consultancies)
SatelcomInstallation of communication system—Megapac
SimdellOffice Automation
Specif(ix) Ltd.Appraisal of unix-based computer system to rectify performance problems
SystematikaDevelopment and maintenance of database
Touche RossSecurity/Contingency CRAM
Triad Special SystemsDatabase enhancements installations and support
TridentDatabase conversion and installation
Triad Special Systems Ltd.Outline User Specification for Office Services Database

Small Businesses

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster if he will make a statement on the achievements of (a) his policies and (b) his Department in helping small businesses over the last 12 months as against the previous 12 months; and if he will publish the

Computer Consultancies

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster if he will list all the computer consultancies employed by his Department and agencies, since November 1991, the tasks for which they were engaged, and the total cost to his Department.

The cost of computer consultancy contracts awarded by the Office of Public Service and Science and its agencies since November 1991 is £818,000. This figure does not include the cost of CCTA computer consultancies. The information requested is not held centrally within CCTA in the form requested and is available only at disproportionate cost.The consultancies and assignments for which they were engaged are as follows:performance indicators by which his Department monitors those achievements and the statistical results of such monitoring.

The Government continue to help small businesses, through improvements to the business climate, through deregulation and through specific programmes of support and assistance. Work carried out by my Department over the last 12 months to assist small businesses includes:

publishing the science engineering and technology White Paper "Realising Our Potential". This paper sets out how Government will be giving increased priority to smaller firms within their programmes for encouraging industrial research and development; and will be seeking to involve companies of all sorts, including small businesses, in the new technology foresight programme;
running two full-day conferences designed to inform businesses of the potential opportunities for competing for Government contracts under the market-testing, programme. These were attended by representatives from over 400 companies, including many small businesses;
encouraging Government Departments and agencies to assist business, including small firms, through citizens charter initiatives such as the VAT charter produced by Customs and Excise, and the Employer's charter produced by the Contributions Agency;
helping the DTI's deregulation unit to frame a code of good practice for enforcement agencies in accordance with citizens charter principles. The code was published on 20 July;
overseeing an efficiency scrutiny into the implementation and enforcement of EC law in the United Kingdom; the report of the scrutiny was also published on 20 July.

Contracting Out

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster if he will list all those services or functions contracted out in his Department and Agencies, since November 1991, in which the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations 1988 were not applied.

Whether or not TUPE applies in any particular case will depend on the nature of the work awarded and the contractors' own proposals for carrying out that work. The services and functions contracted out since November 1991 by the Office of Public Service and Science, including its agencies, and Her Majesty's Stationery Office and the Central Office of Information in which the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations 1988 did not apply are as follows:

Service/Function (and area)

  • Conference and Event Management (CCTA)
  • Data Preparation (Chessington Computer Centre)
  • Distribution of College 1993–94 Prospectus (Civil Service College)
  • Elements of Payroll Development (Chessington Computer Centre
  • Reprographics Unit Basildon (HMSO)
  • Telephonist Service for Downing Street (OPSS)
  • Training (Chessington Computer Centre)
  • Typing Services at Publications Centre (HMSO)

Research Council Chair

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what consideration he is giving to having a research scientist as opposed to an industrialist as chairman of the one research council which will be concerned under his proposals with basic science.

Although the new Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council will not be exempt from a responsibility to consider its contribution to wealth creation, I would not wish to rule out the appointment of a suitably qualified research scientist as part-time non-executive chairman of the council.

Research Vessel Services

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how much money was raised by Research Vessel Services (Barry) in commissioned research and charter income in each of the last three years; and what is the estimated income from this source in the 1993–94 financial year.

Research Vessels Services does not itself carry out commissioned research. Charter receipts are as follows:

YearCharter Receipts (£k)
1990–9135
1991–920
1992–93348
1993–9491

Notes.

1. The 1992–93 figure is provisional, as the council's accounts for that year have not yet been audited.

2. The 1993–94 figure is an estimated one.

Non-Departmental Public Bodies

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster to whom each of the executive non-departmental public bodies sponsored by the Cabinet Office is responsible; whether the public bodies or their members in each case are subject to (a) surcharge, (b) investigation by the Parliamentary Commissioner, (c) scrutiny by the National Audit Office, (d) statutory provisions for open government, (e) performance indicators and (f) provisions under the citizens charters; and whether the chairpersons and members of the boards of each of these bodies are required to declare and interest.

[holding answer 23 July 1993]: The executive non-departmental public bodies sponsored by the Office of Public Service and Science—which forms part of the Cabinet Office—are as follows:

  • Agricultural and Food Research Council
  • Economic and Social Research Council
  • Medical Research Council
  • Natural Environment Research Council
  • Science and Engineering Research Council
The research councils are responsible to my right hon.Friend the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster.

  • (a) Neither the councils nor their members are subject to surcharge;
  • (b) the councils are subject to investigation by the Parliamentary Commissioner;
  • (c) the councils are subject to scrutiny by the National Audit Office;
  • (d) the councils are not subject to open government provisions applying to local government—other than the Data Protection Act 1984—but they will come within the proposals contained within chapters 4, 5 and 6 of the open government White Paper (Command 2290);
  • (e) the councils publish performance indicators in their annual corporate plans;
  • (f) all public servants are subject to the citizens charter. The research councils are encouraged to adopt charter principles.
  • The Cabinet Office also sponsors the Chequers Trust, which is an independent trust.

  • (a) Neither the trust nor its members are subject to surcharge;
  • (b) the trust is not subject to investigation by the Parliamentary Commissioner;
  • (c) the trust is subject to scrutiny by the National Audit Office;
  • (d) the trust is not subject to statutory provisions for open government;
  • (e) the trust is not required to publish performance indicators;
  • (f) the trust operates on citizens charter principles.
  • Before any appointments are made to public bodies great care is taken to ensure that there is no conflict of interest.

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what was the total expenditure by all Departments on executive non-departmental public bodies for each year since 1970–71 in 1991–92 prices.

    [holding answer 23 July 1993]: The following table gives details of the total Government expenditure in 1991–92 prices on executive non-departmental public bodies for the financial year 1978–79 and then each financial year since 1981–82 to 1991–92. Figures for the financial years 1970–71 to 1977–78 and 1979–80 to 1980–81 are not held centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

    Executive non-departmental public bodies
    Total government expenditure (in 1991–92 prices) £ million
    1978–798,010
    1981–826,960
    1982–838,510
    1983–848,200
    1984–857,710
    1985–867,640
    1986–877,910
    1987–887,810
    1988–897,480
    1989–909,940
    1990–9110,730
    1991–9210,320

    National Heritage

    Public Bodies

    To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage how many of the public bodies for which he is responsible hold meetings in public; and if he will list them.

    My Department sponsors 44 non-departmental public bodies and has policy responsibility for five public corporations. None of their board meetings is held in public. Some bodies, however, hold conferences, open days and other kinds of meetings from time to time on matters of general interest attended by members of the public.

    To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage to whom each of the executive non-departmental public bodies is sponsored by the Department of National Heritage is responsible; whether the public bodies or their members in each case are subject to (a) surcharge, (b) investigation by the Parliamentary Commissioner, (c) scrutiny by the National Audit Office, (d)statutory provisions for open government, (e)performance indicators and (f) provisions under the citizens charters; and whether the chairpersons and members of the boards of each of these bodies are required to declare an interest.

    [holding answer 23 July 1993]: My Department's executive non-departmental public bodies—NDPBs—are listed in "Public Bodies 1992", to which should be added the Geffrye museum and the Horniman museum which became executive NDPBs during the course of 1992. The functions and responsibilities of each body are specified in its founding legislation or charter.

    (a) There are no surcharging arrangements.

    (b) Bodies subject to the jurisdiction of the Parliamentary Commissioner for Administration are listed in schedule 2 to the Parliamentary Commissioner Act 1967, as amended. This includes:

    • Arts Council of Great Britain
    • British Film Institute
    • British Library Board
    • Crafts Council
    • English Tourist Board
    • Historic Buildings and Monuments Commission (English Heritage)
    • Museums and Galleries Commission
    • Trustees of the National Heritage Memorial Fund
    • Registrar of Public Lending Right
    • Sports Council

    (c) All of my Department's executive NDPBs are subject to scrutiny by the Comptroller and Auditor General with the exception of the national film development Fund.

    (d) There are no statutory provisions on open government which apply to executive NDPBs.

    (e) Performance indicators for my Department's executive NDPBs can be found in their annual reports and are summarised in the DNH annual report 1993, Cm 2211.

    (f) The principles of the citizens charter apply to all the Department's executive NDPBs. All appointments to NDPBs are made in accordance with guidance provided by the Cabinet Office and the Treasury, which requires Ministers to satisfy themselves that there is no conflict of interest.

    Contracting Out

    To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage if he will list all those services or functions contracted out in his Department and Agencies, since November 1991, in which the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations 1981 were not applied.

    Whether or not the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations apply in any particular case will depend on the nature of the work awarded and the contractors' own proposals for carrying out the work.My Department has contracted out mailroom services, minor maintenance, office cleaning, reprographics, security, central typing and secretarial cover, and the provision of computer equipment and new associated services.The Royal Parks Agency has contracted grounds maintenance and the provision of nursery services and the Historic Royal Parks Agency has contracted out manning of vehicle entrances, ticket checking and the security control room at the Tower of London.

    Computer Consultancies

    To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage if he will list all the computer consultancies employed by his Department and agencies, since November 1991, the tasks for which they were engaged, and the total cost to his Department.

    My Department has used the Government's centre for information systems, the CCTA, to advise on its computer requirements and future information systems strategy. It has also used Sema Group Ltd. to advise on transferring data from former parent Departments, and on various proposals for computer software. To date, the Department has spent £416,658 inclusive of VAT on computer consultancies.The Royal Parks Agency has used KPMG to develop IT-based systems for financial monitoring, grounds maintenance monitoring and crime monitoring for the Royal Parks constabulary. It has also used Mr. Geoffrey Page, an individual consultant, to develop and commence implementation of an IT strategy. To date, it has spent £82,547 inclusive VAT on consultancies.The Historic Royal Palaces Agency has used Ibex Systems Ltd. to develop the agency's financial system at a cost of £1,462 inclusive of VAT.

    Itv Levy

    To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage how he proposes to refund any overpayments of ITV levy.

    During the current financial year it will be necessary to make payments, via the Independent Television Commission, to independent television companies that, in the accounting period to 31 December 1992, made excess payments of levy into the Consolidated Fund. Parliamentary approval to this new service will be sought in a supplementary estimate for the Department of National Heritage home broadcasting vote—class XI vote 4. Pending that approval, urgent expenditure estimated at £4·1 million will be met by repayable advances from the Contingencies Fund.The levy came to an end on 31 December 1992 when it was replaced by the new arrangements for Channel 3 licences laid down in the Broadcasting Act 1990.

    National Lottery

    To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage if he will make a statement about the benefits which may accrue to tourism as a result of the national lottery.

    I hope and expect that the tourism industry will benefit considerably as a result of funds arising from the national lottery. Fixed percentages of the net proceeds of the national lottery will be specifically allocated to areas which will enable British tourist attractions to be improved and enhanced. These allocations, amounting to hundreds of millions of pounds annually, and being additional to any spending otherwise available from the Government, will enable more capital provision to be made for both the natural and built heritage, for the arts, and for sport. For example, funds arising from the national lottery will enable further restoration, preservation and presentation of historic houses, historic sites, galleries and museums to be undertaken. They would also enable capital funding to be made available for visitor centres, designed to increase appropriate access to, and understanding of, our rich heritage. Again, extra funds would be available, for example, for improving existing theatres, or for building new theatres. Similarly, sports stadiums, and other sporting facilities, will be eligible to receive capital sums, which would not otherwise have been available, to improve existing sports facilities, or to add new ones.Funds from the national lottery, however, will not be used to make direct grants to hotels or restaurants on the pattern of the old grants under section 4 of the Development of Tourism Act 1969.In addition to funds arising from the national lottery which are allocated to the improvement of heritage, arts and sport, funds will also be allocated to the Millennium Commission, which is a new body established by the Bill charged with funding projects which celebrate the best of the old millennium and look forward to the new one. The commission will fund a number of visionary projects which, it is hoped, will attract interest worldwide, and thus add to tourist attraction for the United Kingdom.

    To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage if he will make a statement on the timetable for the process of tendering for the licence to run the national lottery.

    The National Lottery etc. Bill has now been read the Third time in another place and the only stage remaining is this House's consideration of Lords amendments. Its passage is therefore virtually completed, and I expect the National Lottery etc. Bill to receive Royal Assent in the autumn. The director general will be appointed and the invitation to tender will be issued shortly thereafter.It is, therefore, intended that urgent work on the preparation of the invitation to tender, and on the selection process for the national lottery operator, should now be set in hand, in consultation with the regulatory adviser whom I expect to appoint shortly.Parliamentary approval to this new service will be sought in a winter supplementary estimate for the office of the national lottery vote—class XI, vote 8—the main estimate for which was presented to Parliament on 17 June. Pending that approval and Royal Assent to the National Lottery etc. Bill, urgent expenditure estimated at £200,000 will be met by repayable advances from the Contingencies Fund. The fact that the National Lottery etc. Bill has completed virtually all of its parliamentary stages is a material factor in the decision to seek recourse to the Contingencies Fund.

    Sports Grants

    To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage if he will give a breakdown of grants given to individual sports by the Sports Council for the last available year.

    The Sports Council's grants to individual sports in 1992–93 were:

    SportTotal
    £
    Angling46,800·00
    Archery83,675·00
    Association football522,275·00

    Sport

    Total

    £

    Athletics682,212·00
    Badminton297,363·00
    Ballooning4,108·00
    Baseball22,250·00
    Basketball419,817·00
    Bobsleigh70,000·00
    Bowls161,080·00
    Boxing109,000·00
    Canoeing344,426·00
    Caving32,000·00
    Cricket802,114·00
    Croquet24,250·00
    Cycling563,924·00
    Diving12,764·00
    Fencing176,530·00
    Flying8,297·00
    Gliding50,250·00
    Golf90,075·00
    Gymnastics653,700·00
    Handball15,445·00
    Hang and Para Gliding70,000·00
    Hockey1,249,166·00
    Judo375,850·00
    Karate13,400·00
    Lacrosse160,150·00
    Land Yachting18,000·00
    Lawn Tennis518,301·00
    Life-Saving52,008·00
    Luge5,000·00
    Modern Pentathlon159,500·00
    Motor Sports27,500·00
    Mountaineering219,650·00
    Multi-Sports5,532,202·00
    Movement and Dance179,572·00
    Netball600,040·00
    Orienteering151,290·00
    Outdoor Activities188,168·00
    Parachuting93,500·00
    Patanqua18,500·00
    Riding201,000·00
    Roller Hockey18,000·00
    Roller Skating18,000·00
    Rowing445,000·00
    Rugby League322,110·00
    Rugby Union118,320·00
    Sailing513,772·00
    Shooting422,304·00
    Skating107,000·00
    Skiing372,325·00
    Squash Rackets25,880·00
    Sub-Aqua2,200·00
    Surfing23,500·00
    Swimming462,565·00
    Table Tennis501,726·00
    Tenpin Bowling9,430·00
    Triathlon62,500·00
    Tug-of-War18,875·00
    Volleyball343,828·00
    Water Skiing237,662·00
    Water Sports120,506·00
    Weight Lifting163,119·00
    Wrestling71,250·00
    Rounders12,055·00
    Other, includes grants to disability, youth, school sports organisations etc.1,377,356·00
    Total20,985,435·00

    Items In Lieu Of Tax

    To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage, pursuant to his answer to the hon. Member for Warwick and Leamington (Sir D. Smith) of 21 July, Official Report, column 247, concerning the two paintings by Edward Vuillard accepted in lieu of inheritance tax, what were the relevant amounts of tax satisfied in respect of each of the paintings; and what conditions were attached, or wishes expressed, as to their destinations.

    I regret that it has not been possible to provide an answer before the summer recess. I shall therefore write to the hon. Member and place a copy of the letter in the Library.

    Writers In Residence

    To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage, pursuant to his answer of 14 July, Official Report, column 508, if he will state the country of origin of the writers from abroad to which grants were made by the Arts Council of Great Britain under its writers in residence scheme; and if he will indicate the place of residence of writers to whom other residency schemes have been made in the United Kingdom during the last five years.

    I regret that it has not been possible to provide an answer before the summer recess. I shall therefore write to the hon. Member and place a copy of the letter in the Library.

    Tourism

    To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage if he will make a statement on his Department's review of regulations in the tourism industry.

    I told the House on 14 June that my Department proposed to carry out an urgent and detailed inquiry into the damaging effects of regulation on the tourism industry. This was because I was extremely concerned at reports of the expensive and time-wasting consequences of many regulations, and of their harmful effects on the competitiveness of our tourism industry.I promised that I would report to the House before the summer recess on what the inquiry had achieved by that date. This I now do.Following my announcement of an inquiry, I wrote asking for facts, examples, opinions, and proposals for change to the chairman of every regional tourist board, to scores of tourist-related trade associations, other relevant bodies, such as local authorities, and individuals such as hoteliers and restaurateurs. I also wrote personally to some 60 Members of Parliament with constituencies where tourism is a significant industry. I held meetings with the chairman of the British Tourist Authority, who is also chairman of the English tourist board, and with the chairmen of the Scottish and Wales tourist boards. I also met many delegations of those directly and personally involved in the tourism industry. I have met the chairman of the Retail and Tourism Task Force and the task force members representing the tourism industry, who have already done much work in this area as part of the deregulation initiative.

    Officials of my Department have also had many detailed discussions with appropriate individuals and bodies.

    The result of all this activity has been a deluge of valuable information from the industry on the subject. I am very grateful to the tourism industry for the swift, detailed and helpful responses I have received.

    As a background to action that will follow from this inquiry, I want to make clear two matters: these regulations, or their interpretation, derive from several very different sources. These sources are the British Government, the European Community, local authorities, NDPBs, individual officials of local authorities and NDPBs, and rumour, ignorance, and misunderstanding; and regulations are, or are perceived to be, damaging for very different reasons. Here are 12 of many such reasons:

  • (i) Some regulations are damaging because they are inappropriately conceived from the start.
  • (ii) Some regulations were well-intentioned in theory but have proved ill conceived in practice.
  • (iii) Some regulations are interpreted in far too heavy-handed or officious a way.
  • (iv) Some regulations are applied in different ways in different parts of the country.
  • (v) Some regulations are applied in different ways in the same tourist outlet, such as a hotel or restaurant, by different officials at different times.
  • (vi) Some regulations are applied in a way where the punishment for non-compliance appears wholly disproportionate to the original breach, or alleged breach, of the regulation.
  • (vii) Some regulations are applied without a clear and straightforward right of appeal against an enforcement.
  • (viii) Some regulations are communicated in language so ill-written, or with guidance so complicated or so lengthy (or both), that they cannot be readily understood.
  • (ix) Some regulations require an implementation which is contradictory to another regulation.
  • (x) Some regulations are enforced strictly in the United Kingdom but are enforced laxly, or not at all, in other parts of the European Community, thus damaging the United Kingdom's competitiveness against tourism overseas.
  • (xi) Some regulations are damaging because they were promulgated originally with other industrial sectors primarily in mind, and without necessary thought being given to their effects on the tourism industry.
  • (xii) Some "regulations" are not regulations at all, but are misinterpretations of regulations by individual bodies or by individual officials of those bodies, or by firms and companies in the pursuit of contracts.
  • In addition to the damaging effect which individual regulations may have on individual businesses at individual times, there is a damaging effect brought about by the accumulation of these regulations—a damaging, cumulative effect which can be far greater than the sum of its parts.

    I should also wish to emphasise most strongly that many regulations are wise and practical.

    My Department's review has so far identified more than 80 pieces of legislation and regulations which affect the industry. It may be that we shall discover even more. I intend to investigate each of these individually and in detail in order to assess whether it imposes unnecessary burdens on tourism businesses.

    Having identified the more than 80 pieces of legislation which I mention above, my inquiry has focused on the damage caused by burdensome regulations, and in

    particular the seven areas most often complained about. These are the subject of detailed and on-going study by my Department. These areas are:

  • (i) Food Safety and Hygiene;
  • (ii) Fire Safety;
  • (iii) Package Travel Regulations;
  • (iv) the Electricity at Work Regulations;
  • (v) Public Entertainment Licensing;
  • (vi) Tourism Signposting; and
  • (vii) Price Display Regulations.
  • Drawing on the information received from tourism businesses, and my Department's consequent research into the regulations concerned, a number of preliminary conclusions and recommendations have been arrived at in each case. I intend to discuss these conclusions and recommendations with ministerial colleagues.

    I also intend to take up two further issues which have been raised with me where the interest of the tourism industry were not primarily considered:

    First, I want to ensure that sufficient account is taken of tourism interests when air services agreements are being negotiated, and that benefits to regional airports can be maximised.

    Second, there is growing concern, particularly, but not exclusively, in coastal resort towns, about the number of hotels which are being converted to hostels for benefit recipients, and about the unpleasant and harmful effects which this change of use is having on tourism, and the quality of life, in those areas.

    My Department's review has also produced the preliminary recommendation that the Department should establish better communications with the grass roots of the tourism industry. My Department must also in future be even more closely linked into the Whitehall consultation process. This is in order to ensure that the implications for tourism of any regulatory proposal are recognised and fully taken into account.

    The preliminary overall conclusion of my review is that the complex proliferation of regulations is unquestionably having a damaging effect on the tourism sector. This should now cease. I intend it to do so.

    In addition to the detailed work which will now be undertaken on individual regulations, my Department is now advancing five guiding principles to be adopted whenever new regulations are being proposed:

  • (i) the specific nature and size of the problem or ill which the regulation is designed to curb must be identified and substantiated, clearly and in detail, before any regulation is proposed;
  • (ii) there should be both a compliance cost assessment, and risk assessment, for every regulation, to produce a cost-benefit analysis which should make specific reference to the impact on small businesses and on tourism;
  • (iii) the Department concerned should consider the new regulation in the context of the body of existing regulations, assess the cumulative effect of this body of regulation, and look at the case for excision, rationalisation or streamlining;
  • (iv) an automatic review should be built in, so that after a set time the Department concerned will assess whether the regulation is achieving its purpose, and is still necessary;
  • (v) consultation machinery between the Department concerned and the tourism industry, and between my Department and other Government Departments, will be improved; in particular, so that the views of the tourism industry are more fully taken into account.
  • I wish to emphasise strongly that this inquiry, and the specific actions that flow from it, are only the start of a continuing campaign to rid the tourism industry of unnecessary regulatory burdens. I shall continue to welcome advice and information from the tourism industry on this subject. During the summer recess, I intend to see representatives of every regional tourist board, in my office, and then to visit every regional tourist area in the field. I shall also be seeing more delegations from those involved directly in the tourism industry.

    English Tourist Board

    To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage what is the outcome of the English tourist board's strategic review.

    The English tourist board—ETB—has concluded a review of how best it might help the tourism industry make its full contribution to the economy by generating additional tourism business. The board retained consultants to conduct the review, and sent me a copy of their report earlier this month. The report contains new prioritised objectives for the board arising from the review, which are supported by the regional tourist boards—RTBs. These give top priority to the ETB's lead body function and action to improve the quality and value for money of the English tourism product. They give lower priority to marketing and programmes designed to encourage visits to a greater variety of destinations. The review also acknowledges the importance of the RTB network to the achievement of the ETB's objectives.I look forward to receiving from the board a fully developed strategy to deliver such objectives in the most effective way within the resources allocated to it in the 1992 public expenditure survey. The board has also bid for additional resources by way of grant-in-aid from 1994–95 onwards. That bid will be considered in the process of the current survey.

    Attorney-General

    Data Processing

    To ask the Attorney-General if he will list the numbers of staff by grade that are employed in the Crown Prosecution Service in the automatic data processing functional specialism.

    The Crown Prosecution Service has 31 staff in the automatic data processing functional specialism. They are graded as follows:

    GradeNumber
    51
    72
    SEO5
    HEO16
    EO7

    To ask the Attorney-General if he will list the numbers of staff by grade that are employed in the Treasury Solicitor's department in the automatic data processing functional specialism.

    The Treasury Solicitor's department has three staff in the automatic data processing functional specialism. They are graded as follows:

    GradeNumber
    71
    EO2

    Contracting Out

    To ask the Attorney-General if he will list all those services or functions contracted out in the Treasury Solicitor's department, since November 1991, in which the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations 1981 were not applied.

    No services or functions have been contracted out in the Treasury Solicitor's department since November 1991.

    To ask the Attorney-General if he will list all those services or functions contracted out in the Crown Prosecution Service, since November 1991, in which the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations 1981 were not applied.

    The Crown Prosecution Service has contracted out one function since November 1991 to which the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations 1981 were not applied. This was its headquarters reprographics service, involving two permanent members of staff, both of whom were offered alternative posts within CPS (HQ).

    Computer Consultancies

    To ask the Attorney-General if he will list all the computer consultancies employed by the Crown Prosecution Service, since November 1991, the tasks for which they were engaged, and the total cost to his Department.

    The computer consultancies employed by the Crown Prosecution Service since November 1991 and the tasks for which they were engaged are as follows:

    ConsultantsTask engaged
    Yale ConsultingLocal Area Networking Strategy and Technical Support
    Integrated Project SupportEstablishment of a Project Support Office
    Oracle CorporationSoftware Development
    Bull Information SystemsSoftware Development
    Infact LtdCabling Specification for New Buildings and Supervision of Cabling Installation
    Axsis ConsultantsTelecommunications Strategy
    Mouncey and PartnersSystem Integration Consultancy
    SequelogicSoftware Development
    Amtec ConsultingInformation Systems Strategy Study
    Olivetti LtdSoftware Integration
    QuadratronSoftware Integration
    HunterskilSoftware Development
    ComshareSoftware Design
    HoskynsProject Support Set Up
    Art of Management LtdRisk Management
    The total cost to the Crown Prosecution Service is £746,946, inclusive of VAT.

    To ask the Attorney-General if he will list all the computer consultancies employed by the Treasury Solicitor's Department, since November 1991, the tasks for which they were engaged, and the total cost to his Department.

    The computer consultancies employed by the Treasury Solicitor's Department since November 1991 and the tasks for which they were engaged are set out in the following list.

    CCTA

    • Procurement replacement UNIX system
    • Procure PC maintenance contract
    • Recruitment advice and assistance
    • IS strategy study

    AXSIS Consultants

    Advise on, and assist with, local area network and software requirements, selection and implementation

    Telecom Capita

    Advise on alternative wide area network strategy and costs

    B. Yates

    Advise on loading disbursement data

    The total cost to the Treasury Solicitor's Department is approximately £84,385, inclusive of VAT.

    Small Businesses

    To ask the Attorney-General if he will make a statement on the achievements of (a) his policies and (b) his Department in helping small businesses over the last 12 months as against the previous 12 months; and if he will publish the performance indicators by which his Department monitors those achievements and the statistical results of such monitoring.

    The Government continue to place a high priority on helping small businesses through improvements to the business climate, through deregulation and through specific programmes of support and assistance.The departments for which I am responsible are the legal secretariat to the Law Officers, the Treasury Solicitor's department, the Crown Prosecution Service and the Serious Fraud Office. The services provided by the first two are largely internal to Government. The functions of the Crown Prosecution Service and the Serious Fraud Office relate purely to the criminal justice system.As regards purchasing, all the departments have regard to the desirability of encouraging small businesses in line with the policy of the Government as a whole. However, no specific programmes of support and assistance operate in the departments for which I am responsible.

    Regina V Brown

    To ask the Attorney-General what action he is intending following the Court of Appeal decision in Regina v. Brown of 28 May; and if he will place a transcript of the judgment in the Library.

    The Director of Public Prosecutions has invited the Court of Appeal to certify that a point of general public importance arises in relation to the meaning to be attached to the words "use" when applied to personal data within section 5 of the Data Protection Act 1984, and to grant leave to appeal on this point to the House of Lords.No transcript of the judgment of the Court of Appeal is yet available.

    Court Proceedings

    To ask the Attorney-General when the Crown Prosecution Service expects to proceed with the case against the prisoner, details of which have been communicated to his office by the hon. Member for Stretford.

    The case to which the hon. Member refers is listed for trial at Manchester Crown court on 1 November 1993. I will write in more detail to the hon. Member in due course.

    Education

    Complaints (Young People)

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many complaints have been made under section 23 of the Education Reform Act 1988 concerning the specific actions of local education authorities in relation to the curriculum or religious worship; and what were the figures for each local education area in each year since 1989.

    The table shows the number of complaints received by local education authorities in academic years 1990–91 and 1991–92—the only years for which information is available. The figures include complaints received via the governing body of a school as well as those made direct to the local education authority. Only those authorities that have notified the Department of one or more complaints are included.

    1990–911991–92
    Avon3
    Bedfordshire1
    Bradford1
    Bury1
    Coventry1
    Cumbria1
    Derbyshire1
    Ealing1
    East Sussex2
    Greenwich1
    Harrow1
    Hillingdon11
    Islington3
    Kensington1
    Kent1
    Lancashire1
    Leeds1
    Manchester1
    Northamptonshire1
    Oxfordshire1
    Richmond1
    Rochdale1
    Sheffield4
    Southwark5
    Suffolk11
    Tameside1
    Trafford1
    Total1427

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many complaints have been received from children or young people aged 18 years or under in relation to section 23 of the Education Reform Act 1988 according to each local education authority area for each year since 1989.

    The returns which local education authorities make to the Department for Education do not specify the age of the complainant.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many complaints have been received by his Department in relation to section 219 of the Education Reform Act 1988 in each year since 1989; and how many complaints related to (a) the conduct of local education authorities, (b) the conduct of governing bodies of maintained schools, (c) grant-maintained schools, (d) higher education corporations and (e) institutions of further and higher education maintained or assisted by local education authorities.

    This information will take some time to collate. I will write to the hon. Member as soon as it is available.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will make it his policy to amend circular 1/89 on local arrangements for the consideration of complaints to include references to complaints from pupils.

    No. Circular 1/89 already states that complaints may be made by "parents and others" and section 23 of the Education Reform Act places no restrictions on who may make a formal complaint about the curriculum or collective worship.

    Nursery Education

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education what percentage of children receive publicily funded nursery places in (a) Belgium, (b) Italy, (c) Spain, (d) Greece, (e) Germany and (f) the United Kingdom; and if he will make a statement.

    Information is not centrally available in the form requested. The table shows the latest available information on combined public and private participation rates in pre-compulsory schooling. Separate participation rates are not available. There are also some differences between countries in the distinction drawn between education and day care. If the United Kingdom figures are defined to include nursery schools, nursery classes, infant classes, pre-school play groups and group day care, the participation rates for both three to four and three to five-year-olds increase to over 90 per cent.

    Participation in pre-primary education by age group,19891 Percentage of age group
    Age at which compulsory schooling startsEducationPercentage of private sector provision 1987
    3 to 53 to 4
    Belgium16969658
    Germany66352271
    Italy136767633
    Spain6695337
    1988–89 outturn £ million1989–90 outturn £ million1990–91 outturn £ million1991–92 outturn £ million1992–93 provisional £ million
    Grant-maintained schools01869183485
    City technology colleges1430585650

    Age at which compulsory schooling starts

    Education

    Percentage of private sector provision 1987

    3 to 5

    3 to 4

    United Kingdom564466

    466

    450

    11988 data for Belgium and Italy.

    2In Germany, some providers of private sector provision receive some public subsidy.

    3Estimated.

    41991 data.

    Sources: Table AA: Education Statistics for the United Kingdom, 1992 edition.

    Student Unions

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will list the dates of each visit undertaken by members of his Department to student unions since April 1992; and what plans he has to visit student unions before the end of October.

    Officials have made visits to universities and colleges relating to student unions since April 1992 on 26 October and 8 and 9 December 1992; and on 26 January; 8, 12, 19, 22 and 25 February; 4, 5, 8, 11, 12 and 16 March; 22 April; and 7 and 14 May 1993. Other visits by Ministers and officials to universities and colleges also commonly include discussions with representatives of students.

    Public Bodies

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many of the public bodies for which he is responsible hold meetings in public; and if he will list them.

    Student Funding

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education what plans he has to alter the funding arrangements for British students undertaking first degrees at United Kingdom universities; and if he will make a statement.

    My right hon. Friend keeps the arrangements for the funding of students under periodic review. Any plans for changes, in this or any other field, would be announced at the appropriate time.

    Public Spending

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education what has been the total gross public spending on (a) grant-maintained schools and (b) city technology colleges for the years since 1988–89; and what is the projected expenditure for the years to 1995–96 at 1991–92 prices.

    Spending to date on grant-maintained schools and city technology colleges has been as follows:

    Total spending in future years on grant-maintained schools will depend on the number of schools becoming grant maintained, their size and location, and the balance between primary and secondary schools. However, on current trends a reasonable estimate would be about:

    £ million (1991–92 prices)

    1993–94

    1994–95

    1995–96

    Grant-maintained schools1,1002,3004,000

    Projected future spending on city technology colleges is as follows:

    £ million (1991–92 prices)

    1993–94

    1994–95

    1995–96

    City technology colleges474648

    Note:

    Figures for GM schools include annual maintenance grant. which is recovered from local authorities; special purpose grants; capital grant; cost of GM ballots; the Grant Maintained Schools Centre; the projected cost of the Funding Agency for Schools. They exclude other spending by local authorities, who remain responsible for some services to GM pupils, and DFE running costs.

    Assisted Places

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many pupils attended each school taking part in the assisted places scheme in 1992–93 during the year; and how many in each case were on an assisted place.

    The information requested is given in the table:

    Numbers of pupils in APS schools in A Y 1992–93
    School nameNumber of pupils on rollNumber of assisted pupils
    Abbey School, Reading1,03548
    Abingdon76294
    Ackworth50718
    Aldenham33426
    Alice Ottley71586
    Alleyns, Dulwich1,038203
    Ardingly College63219
    Arnold School, Blackpool1,14380
    Ashford60641
    Ashville College7009
    Austin Friars3008
    Bancrofts90580
    Barnard Castle58613
    Bath High GPDST626114
    Batley Grammar595253
    Bedales6287
    Bedford1,123103
    Bedford High987120
    Bedford Modern1,204154
    Belvedere GPDST567178
    Berkhamstead Girls59411
    Berkhamstead74821
    Birkenhead1,112205
    Birkenhead High GPDST1,021243
    Bishop's Stortford College59147
    Blackheath High GPDST526101
    Bloxham, Banbury34120
    Bolton School Boys1,003267
    Bolton School Girls1,139254
    Bootham, York34620
    Bradfield College5896
    Bradford Girls Grammar88063
    Bradford Grammar School1,145222
    Brentwood School1,196100

    School name

    Number of pupils on roll

    Number of assisted pupils

    Brighton College47116
    Brighton-Hove High GPDST730148
    Bristol Cathedral467137
    Bristol Grammar1,232267
    Bromley High GPDST76087
    Bromsgrove1,17820
    Bruton Girls573130
    Burgess Hill Girls61120
    Bury Grammar Boys790204
    Bury Grammar Girls1,128246
    Canford49427
    Carmel College23672
    Casterton33053
    Caterham1,049127
    Central Newcastle High GPDST861127
    Charterhouse6999
    Cheadle Hulme907129
    Cheltenham Ladies College83414
    Chigwell64771
    Christ's Hospital81521
    Churchers College565128
    City of London840138
    City of London Freemans67516
    City of London Girls643114
    Clifton College, Bristol1,17069
    Clifton High, Bristol78946
    Colfe's892186
    Colston's Girls555170
    Colston's, Bristol61688
    Coventry, Bablake926178
    Cranleigh72027
    Croham Hurst52819
    Croydon High GPDST1,06584
    Culford62149
    Dame Alice Harpur977140
    Dame Allans Boys462112
    Dame Allans Girls452127
    Dauntseys61454
    Denstone College273103
    Derby High52815
    Douai, Reading23820
    Dover College27218
    Downe House, Newbury48110
    Dulwich College1,380273
    Durham48629
    Edgbaston College Girls38519
    Edgehill College509141
    Ellesmere College3529
    Eitham College751109
    Emanuel, London763290
    Epsom College66427
    Exeter834168
    Farnborough Hill503150
    Felixstowe College30620
    Felsted, Dunmow56245
    Forest School1,200130
    Framlingham College7209
    Francis Holland36618
    Friends, Saffron Walden27285
    Giggleswick, Settle43512
    Godolphin and Latymer702157
    Godolphin, Salisbury35220
    Greshams75310
    Guildford High Girls61616
    Haberdashers Askes Boys1,327250
    Haberdashers Askes Girls1,134123
    Haileybury and ISC62815
    Hampton908200
    Harrogate College39118
    Headington71414
    Hereford Cathedral587233
    Highgate91435
    Hipperholme Grammar3669
    Holy Child33815
    Hulme Grammar Boys832210
    Hulme Grammar Girls626184

    School name

    Number of pupils on roll

    Number of assisted pupils

    Hurstpierpoint College50518
    Hymers College937148
    Ipswich75977
    Ipswich High GPDST611102
    James Aliens Girls1,039168
    John Lyons523107
    Kent College69688
    Kimbolton Schools71220
    King Edward VI High549127
    King Edward VI Norwich745113
    King Edward VI Southampton958241
    King Edward VII Lytham597225
    King Edwards at Bath855110
    King Edwards Birmingham844244
    King Edwards Witley50761
    King Henry VIII1,08492
    Kings College Wimbledon91064
    Kings High Girls, Warwick558124
    Kings, Bruton30917
    Kings, Chester61092
    Kings, Macclesfield1,026150
    Kings, Rochester60964
    Kings, Tynemouth89515
    Kings, Worcester931182
    Kingsley58316
    Kingston Grammar585160
    Kingswood School, Bath46944
    Kirkham Grammar65380
    La Sagesse Convent493161
    Lady Eleanor Holles81637
    Latymer Upper1,049312
    Laxton1852
    Leeds Girls High98678
    Leeds Grammar1,137168
    Leicester Grammar56130
    Leighton Park31121
    Leys, Cambridge37836
    Liverpool College694185
    Lord Wandsworth College43281
    Loreto Convent Grammar81257
    Loughborough Grammar918126
    Loughborough High52789
    Magdalen College484125
    Malvern College67287
    Manchester Grammar1,436274
    Manchester High959175
    Marist Convent Senior4009
    Maynard564163
    Merchant Taylors Girls906187
    Merchant Taylors, L'pool844213
    Merchant Taylors, N'wood71581
    Mill Hill55669
    Monkton Combe32341
    Mount Carmel, Cheshire57720
    Mount St. Mary's College31970
    Mount, York29718
    Newcastle under Lyme1,329390
    Newcastle upon Tyne Church60820
    North London Collegiate91598
    Northampton High804149
    Norwich High GPDST855164
    Notting Hill/Ealing High774105
    Nottingham Girls High GPDST1,078194
    Nottingham High827160
    Oakham1,01520
    Old Palace, Croydon743205
    Oxford High, GPDST64876
    Pangbourne College41619
    Perse School for Boys65352
    Perse School for Girls69166
    Plymouth College866200
    Pocklington702146
    Polam Hall46827
    Portsmouth Grammar1,102191
    Portsmouth High GPDST755137
    Prior Park College44620

    School name

    Number of pupils on roll

    Number of assisted pupils

    Putney High School GPDST80779
    Queen Elizabeth Hospital503169
    Queen Elizabeth, Blackburn1,220260
    Queen Elizabeth, Wakefield744132
    Queen Mary, Lytham622233
    Queens College, London38981
    Queens College, Taunton69967
    Queens School, Chester61369
    Ratcliffe College45977
    Red Maids, Bristol573173
    Redland High, Bristol65693
    Reed's School, Cobham39120
    Reigate Grammar81299
    Rendcomb College22720
    Repton58454
    Rossall70542
    Royal Grammar, Guildford794140
    Royal Grammar, Newcastle1,128239
    Royal Grammar, Worcester916282
    Ryde School6299
    Salesian College50265
    Scarborough College41621
    Sedbergh42447
    Sevenoaks, Kent93916
    Sheffield High GPDST75393
    Shrewsbury High GPDST59984
    Silcoates5648
    Sir William Perkins53896
    Solihull1,00628
    South Hampstead High GPDST74372
    St. Albans637120
    St. Albans High Girls68153
    St Ambrose College82059
    St. Anselms College919207
    St. Bede's College1,136220
    St. Bees28577
    St. Benedict's59577
    St. Catherine's57834
    St. Dunstan's College746147
    St. Edmund's College57379
    St. Edward's College937396
    St. Felix, Southwold36018
    St. George's College47434
    St. Helen and St. Katherine51895
    St. Helen's, Northwood92448
    St. John's College, Southsea855200
    St. John's, Leatherhead3906
    St. Joseph's College, Ipswich64676
    St. Joseph's College, Stoke45015
    St. Joseph's Convent, Reading422131
    St. Lawrence College, Ramsgate35622
    St. Margaret's, Bushey45320
    St. Margaret's, Exeter44819
    St. Mary and St. Anne27715
    St. Mary's College, Crosbey789254
    St. Mary's Convent, Cambridge592118
    St. Mary's Hall, Brighton38963
    St. Maurs Convent, Weybridge66858
    St. Paul's Girls, Hammersmith61173
    St. Paul's, Barnes1,16980
    St. Peter's, York756120
    St. Swithun's Winchester6420
    Stafford Grammar27415
    Stamford93098
    Stamford High1,014101
    Stockport Grammar994240
    Stoneyhurst College39835
    Stowe5728
    Streatham Hill/Clapham High537153
    Surbiton High73720
    Sutton High GPDST80874
    Sutton Valence36858
    Sydenham High GPDST683129
    Talbot Heath519140
    Taunton98752
    Teesside High55014

    School name

    Number of pupils on roll

    Number of assisted pupils

    Tonbridge6386
    Tormead56420
    Trent College650124
    Trinity—of John Whitgift812140
    Truro876116
    Truro High35564
    University College School77072
    Upton Hall Convent604170
    Ursuline Convent, Kent26820
    Ursuline High, Ilford383138
    Wakefield High1,066148
    Walthamstow Hall61250
    Warwick999147
    Wellingborough77168
    Wellington College80237
    Wellington, Somerset838226
    Wells Cathedral80176
    West Buckland55583
    Westholme99020
    Westminster64956
    Whitgift, Croydon956106
    William Hulme Grammar793220
    Wimbledon High GPDST79376
    Winchester College66423
    Wisbech Grammar628326
    Withington Girls59074
    Wolverhampton Grammar646256
    Woodbridge748121
    Woodhouse Grove737135
    Worksop34620
    Wrekin College3179
    Wycliffe College56543
    Yarm58629

    Churston Grammar School

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will increase the maximum allocation for the next academic year for the Churston grammar school, Churston, to 120 pupils as requested by the school.

    My right hon. Friend has not received a request to increase the standard number for Churston grammar school.

    Primary School Teachers

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many responses have been received to his draft circular on the initial training of primary school teachers issued on 9 June; how many of those responses were unfavourable; and if he will make a statement.

    The consultation period on my right hon. Friend's draft circular on the initial training of primary teachers lasts until the end of July. We will consider the responses carefully before making announcements. We plan to issue the circular in its final form in the early autumn.

    City Technology Colleges

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education what rules cover the personal responsibility of governors of city technology colleges; whether members are required to declare interests; what statutory provision is made for public access to information about a college or its governors' proceedings; what charter provisions apply to their activities; and whether they are subject to performance indicators.

    Governors of city technology colleges hold office under schemes of government—approved under the funding agreements for the colleges. Governors must declare an interest in respect of any contract in which they have an interest and may not vote on the matter. Like maintained schools, CTCs publish prospectuses and annual reports to parents and, as companies, their annual accounts are open to public inspection. In general, the provisions of the parents charter apply to the parents of pupils at CTCs, but CTCs are independent schools and the funding agreements for the colleges predate the charter. These funding agreements provide for the supply of information on performance indicators.

    Governing Bodies

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education from which categories the governing bodies of further education colleges and six-form colleges are obliged to appoint new members; what are the rules about the personal responsibility of members of the governing bodies of such colleges; if members are required to declare interest and whether a register of such interests is open to public inspection; what statutory provisions govern public access to information about a college and its governors' proceedings and for holding public meetings; to which provisions of the citizens charter or specific charters relating to their own activities they are subject; and what performance indicators are in place.

    Further education corporations were established on 30 September 1992 to conduct further education and sixth-form collegese. The composition of corporations is set out in their instrument of government, which has been prescribed by statutory instrument—1992 No. 1957 and 1992 No. 1963. New members are appointed as and when vacancies arise following the resignation, or completion of the terms of office, of existing members. The conduct of FE corporations is governed by their instruments and articles of government.Colleges are not required to keep a register of members' interests, but corporation members are required, under the instrument of government, to declare any financial interest in the supply of work or goods to the institution or any contract concerning the institution. They must not take part in any discussions relating to a matter in which they have a financial interest nor may they vote on it. Minutes of corporation meetings are made available for inspection at the institution during normal office hours.Governors will have a part to play in ensuring that their college meets the requirements of the forthcoming charter for further education and develops its own charter within the national framework set.My right hon. Friend has asked the Further Education Funding Council to work with colleges on the development of performance indicators for the sector. At present, colleges collect and use whatever information they think necessary to assist them in assessing their performance. Later this year, the Department will be publishing comparative tables of the academic and vocational achievements of 16 to 18-year-olds in colleges in the further education sector, and colleges themselves will be required to publish comprehensive information on the achievements and career routes of their students.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education what is the current total of grant-maintained schools; what are the rules about the personal responsibility of members of the government bodies of such schools; whether members are required to declare interests; what statutory provision is made for public access to information about a school and the governors' proceedings; what charter provisions apply to their activities; and whether they are subject to performance indicators.

    A total of 493 schools have been incorporated as self-governing—grant-maintained—in England to date. A further 170 have been approved to become self governing. Grant-maintained schools in Wales are the responsibility of my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Wales.As in LEA schools, individual governors of self-governing schools are not normally personally liable for actions and decisions of the governing body. However, appeals committees members may be personally liable for the decisions they make. The Department recommends that governing bodies take out insurance against this contingency.Members of governing bodies of self-governing schools are required by their instrument of government to declare any pecuniary interest, direct or indirect, in any matter which is to be considered at a governing body meeting.The articles of government of a self-governing school provide that a copy of each of the instruments and articles of government, the prospectus, the governors' annual report, the audited accounts for the previous school year and non-confidential parts of the minutes of meetings of the governing body must be made available for public inspection.The parents charter makes a number of references to the responsibilities of self-governing schools' governing bodies. These responsibilities are set out in full in the schools' articles of government.Requirements in respect of schools' performance apply equally to self-governing and local education authority-maintained schools.

    Schools Funding Agency

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether the Schools Funding Agency, its chairperson and members will be subject to (a) surcharge, (b) investigation by the Parliamentary Commissioner, (c) scrutiny by the National Audit Office, (d) statutory provisions for public access to information, (e) performance indicators and (f) provisions under the citizens charter; and whether the chairperson and members will be required to declare relevant interests, in a form available for inspection.

    The information is as follows:

    Declare interests
    SurchargeNo
    Investigation by the Parliamentary CommissionerNo
    Scrutiny by National Audit OfficeYes
    Statutory provisions for public access to informationNo
    Performance indicatorsYes
    Citizens' CharterPresumed yes
    Requirement to declare an interest1Yes
    11 Availability to be considered

    Non-Departmental Public Bodies

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to his answer of 6 July, Official Report, columns 95–96, whether his Department maintains a register of the interests declared by chairpersons and board members of the executive non-departmental public bodies, available for inspection at his or at the main offices of the eight relevant bodies.

    As each of our non-departmental public bodies maintains a proper degree of operational independence, the Department does not recognise a need to maintain a central register giving these details. It is for the bodies themselves to decide whether to maintain records of their members' interests.

    Drugs

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he intends to take to promote drugs education and prevention within the education system.

    We will continue our policy of stimulating, encouraging and supporting work within schools and the youth service, with a view to ensuring that young people are made aware of the dangers of drug misuse, and are equipped with the attitudes and skills they need to resist pressures to use or misuse them. In addition, all maintained schools are already required to promote education about drugs as part of national curriculum science.

    Pupil Exclusions

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education what plans he has to publish details of the number of pupils excluded from individual grant-maintained schools.

    Information on permanent exclusions from maintained schools in England was collected by the Department over a two-year period, starting with summer term 1990, under the national exclusions reporting system. The results of the survey were published on 23 April and showed that a total of 6,743 permanent exlusions had been reported, with 2,910 in year one and 3,833 in year two. This information was collected for purposes of national aggregation and it is not possible to provide a breakdown of the figures by school or by sector because of assurances given as to confidentiality.

    Further Education Funding Councils

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will list the names of the members of the regional committees of the further education and higher education funding councils who have already been nominated, together with the regional committees to which no appointment has yet been made and the date on which any outstanding appointment will be made; which organisations were consulted on the appointments; and what was the form and nature of any such consultation.

    [pursuant to his reply, 16 June 1993, c. 599]: I am pleased to announce the appointment of Lady Mary Holborow as chairman of the south-west regional committee of the Further Education Funding Council.

    Employment

    Devon And Cornwall Tec

    To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what proportion of trainees on courses sponsored by Devon and Cornwall training and enterprise council entered full-time employment in the year to March.

    The latest full year for which figures are available is April 1991 to March 1992. During that year, 21 per cent. of those leaving employment training went into full-time employment and 7 per cent. into part-time employment. A further 11 per cent. undertook activities including training, full-time education, work experience or voluntary work.Over the same period, 56 per cent. of those leaving youth training went into full-time employment and 4 per cent. into part-time employment. A further 12 per cent. went into other training or full-time education.

    Training

    To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what is the latest information he has on the number of people who are participating on training courses which are supported by the European social fund; how many are operated by (a) training and enterprise councils and local enterprise companies, (b) local authorities and further education colleges and (c) voluntary organisations; how many people will benefit from ESF training courses in the current operational year; and if he will make a statement.

    The latest information available on numbers of participants on European social fund—ESF—courses in 1993 organised by the three organisational sectors requested, is as follows:

    SectorBeneficiaries
    Training and Enterprise Councils, Local Enterprise Companies (including Departmental programmes to help the unemployed):692,000
    Local Authorities/Further Education Colleges:438,000
    Voluntary sector:106,000
    Overall we currently expect some 1,308,000 people to benefit from ESF-funded training during 1993. This figure is likely to rise as further projects continue to be approved.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Employment if he will make a further statement on the implementation of the training for work scheme.

    Training for work became available from 29 March as a major part of the range of opportunities available to help people back to work. It is being delivered in all parts of the country by the network of training and enterprise councils.

    Methyl Bromide

    To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what information he has on reported cases of (a) illness, (b) eye infections and (c) cases of skin damage directly related to contact with methyl bromide.

    In the period January 1987 to March 1993, a total of four cases of reported ill health, relating to two incidents, were confirmed by the pesticides incidents appraisal panel as being attributable to the use of methyl bromide.Information has also been obtained from incidents reported to the Health and Safety Executive under the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1986. Since these regulations came into force, five such cases have been reported. These included one case of nose irritation; one of respiratory irritation and neurological symptons; and one of acute irritant effects.

    Small Businesses

    To ask the Secretary of State for Employment if he will make a statement on the achievements of (a) his policies and (b) his Department in helping small businesses over the last 12 months as against the previous 12 months; and if he will publish the performance indicators by which his Department monitors those achievements and the statistical results of such monitoring.

    The Government continue to help small businesses through improvements to the business climate, through deregulation and through specific programmes of support and assistance.Measures operated by the Department to assist small businesses include:

    The Business Start Up Scheme (formerly the Enterprise Allowance Scheme), which provides an allowance and training/counselling support in the early months of trading to unemployed people who start their own businesses. Its performance is measured in terms of numbers taking up support and the survival rate of these businesses. Around 50,000 people were awarded an allowance in 1991–92, and just over 40,000 in 1992–93. Survey evidence has consistently shown that of those people completing the full term of Enterprise Allowance, approximately 76 per cent. were still trading 6 months later (ie 18 months after start-up).
    From April 1991, Training and Enterprise Councils (TECs) have been delivering the Scheme and have enjoyed considerable local discretion in its design and selection criteria. They have been placing greater emphasis on increasing the quality of the businesses they support in order to improve survival. Evaluation studies assessing the performance of the Business Start Up Scheme have recently been completed and are expected to be published in due course.
    The Department makes significant funds available to TECs to enable them to support the development of small businesses. TECs provide a varied range of help including consultancy support, advice and guidance and training audits. TECs increasingly are linking this support to achievement of the Investors in People national standard. Action materials to specifically help small businesses achieve the standard have been developed. Investors in People sets a standard for the training and development of people to achieve business objectives—a vital requirement for business, regardless of size. Of the 307 organisations which have met the standard so far, 179 are employers with less than 200 employees. There are over 3,300 employers committed to achieving the Standard, including many small businesses.

    Blind And Partially Sighted People

    To ask the Secretary of State for Employment (1) what arrangements his Department makes to ensure that blind and partially sighted people have access to information produced by his Department where it has not been published in alternative media such as Braille, large print or tape;

    (2) what is his Department's policy on which information produced by his Department is published in alternative media to standard print such as Braille, tape or large print.

    The Department aims to provide the general public with a wide range of information relating to employment and training. We ensure that important information is available in formats other than hard text to make it accessible to people who are blind or visually impaired. The decision about what is translated depends on the content and intended audience for the document. Some information is provided in direct translation, for example, the job seekers charter and leaflets on the Department's services, such as "Make It Work". The Department is most likely to produce translations of material that covers a summary of services or programmes rather than producing several versions of small leaflets. We can arrange for correspondence to be sent in Braille where it is requested.

    Contracting Out

    To ask the Secretary of State for Employment if he will list all those services or functions contracted out in his Department and agencies, since November 1991, in which the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations 1988 were not applied.

    The Department currently contracts out a large proportion of its services and functions. To list them all would involve disproportionate cost. The application of the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations 1981 depends upon the facts of each case. The regulations have not been treated as applying to any of the activities contracted out since November 1991.

    Data Processing

    To ask the Secretary of State for Employment if he will list the numbers of staff by grade that are employed in his Department and Agencies in the automatic data processing functional specialism.

    The Employment Department group employs a total of 732 staff in the automatic data processing—ADP—functional specialism. A breakdown of staff numbers by grade within the Department and its agencies as in July 1993 is given in the table:

    Employment Department Group Numbers of staff by grade in ADP functional specialism (July 1993)
    Part of groupGradeNumber of staff
    Employment Department HQ (ED HQ)SEO60
    HEO121
    EO147
    AO129
    AA288
    Employment Service (ES)SEO36
    HEO76
    EO106
    AO2
    AAnil
    Health and Safety Executive (HSE)SEO9
    HEO21
    EO37

    Part of group

    Grade

    Number of staff

    AOnil
    AAnil

    1Includes 3 part-time staff.

    2Includes 35 part-time staff.

    19 full-time casual staff.
    11 part-time casual staff.

    Computer Consultancies

    To ask the Secretary of State for Employment if he will list all the computer consultancies employed by his Department and agencies, since November 1991, the tasks for which they were engaged, and the total cost to his Department.

    The Employment Department group has employed a total of 299 computer consultancies involving 106 companies since November 1991, a list of these is given at annex A. The tasks for which they were engaged are listed in annex B. The total cost of these consultancies to the Department amounts to:

    £
    Employment Department Head Quarters (EDHQ)4,197,139
    Employment Service (ES)5,530,503
    Health and Safety Executive (HSE)655,824
    Total10,383,466
    Annex A
    Employment department group List of computer consultancies since November 1991
    Number of contracts
    CompanyED HQESHSE
    451 Computer Services1
    ACT Logsys331
    Admiral Management Services31
    Amtec12
    Andersons4
    Ansley Gutherie1
    Arena Resources7
    Ashberry2
    ASK Ingres2
    Atlantic4
    BIS Information Systems Ltd.11
    Bull HN Information Systems Ltd.1
    C. Newton Associates1
    CAS1
    CCC1
    Class1
    Compel Systems Ltd.2
    Computer Associates2
    Computer People2
    Computer Search and Select2
    Comtex UK Ltd.1
    Coopers and Lybrand Deloitte23
    CPI5
    CSS Trident3
    Data Sciences1
    Dataflex1
    DBI Associates511
    Derengrove1—.
    Digital Equipment Co. Ltd.42
    Disc Europe1
    E. Bingham2
    Easams41
    EFD Total System Consultants1
    Elan1
    Emslie Phelps2

    Number of contracts

    Company

    ED HQ

    ES

    HSE

    Ernst and Young162
    Executor11
    FI Kernal2
    Franklin1
    Future Dimension4
    Hewlett Packard Ltd1
    HI-BROW1
    Hoskyns Group322
    Human Factors Consultancy1
    Hunterskill Limited4
    ICL11
    Ingres21
    ISM3
    Keisley Harris1
    Kermon1
    Kernal Technology2
    Kinesis3
    Inference (Europe)4
    IQ Software1
    LA International1
    IBMS1
    Logica3
    London HCI1
    Look Systems1
    Lorien43
    M Brookes1
    Marcol2
    Michael Gore1
    MSW3
    Myriad4
    Novatek Limited1
    Olivetti1
    Oracle13
    PA Consulting36
    Pactum1
    PE International7
    Perfect Recall2
    Portfolio Systems Ltd1
    Price Waterhouse14
    Prospective Technica11
    Puretrans1
    Quadraton13
    Quality Projects2
    Quando1
    RCMS1
    South Yorks SAT Systems1
    Sapphire2
    SBS2
    Scientific and Business Systems8
    Sema Group12
    Sheffield Hallam1
    SIA Langton Ltd1
    Silkglade2
    Software Sciences1
    Span Computer Contracts2

    Staffwise2
    System Applied Technology1
    Tailor Made Software1
    Tamar Computer Services1
    Task Force1
    Traid2
    Trainvalue1
    Trident1
    Unicorn Training Partnership21
    UNIX System Labs1
    Xentec Limited4.—
    V Keehan1
    VNG2
    World Systems2
    WS Atkins1
    Yale Data16
    Total1848728

    Annex B

    Employment Department Group List of tasks undertaken by computer consultants since November 1991

    Task

    ED HQ

    ES

    HSE

    Analysis and programming

    *

    *

    Audit

    *

    Contract advice

    *

    Data management

    *

    Database management/administration

    *

    Evaluation

    *

    Hardware testing

    *

    Help desk

    *

    Human computer interface

    *

    Infrastructure

    *

    IT strategy consultancy/advice

    *

    *

    *

    Market testing

    *

    Micro installation

    *

    Networking

    *

    Plans review

    *

    Procurement

    *

    Project management

    *

    *

    Project review

    *

    Project support

    *

    Quality assurance analysis

    *

    *

    Quality assurance analysis

    *

    Quality audit

    *

    Risk assessment

    *

    Scoping study

    *

    Security

    *

    Service level agreements

    *

    Service management

    *

    Software development

    *

    System analysis

    *

    System design/development

    *

    *

    *

    System testing

    *

    Technical accountancy

    *

    Technical authorship

    *

    Technical training

    *

    *

    Telecomms

    *

    TPM
    Unit costing

    *

    Voice cabling

    *

    Executive Staff

    To ask the Secretary of State for Employment if he will list the number of executive staff employed in his Department in (a) Scotland and (b) the United Kingdom in the current year, and in each of the previous five years.

    The information available is given in the table. Information is not readily available in the form requested before 1989:

    Executive staff-employed in Scotland

    Executive staff employed in the United Kingdom

    19931,94522,334
    19921,90222,238
    19912,04719,833
    19902,10620,360
    19892,06620,407

    Public Bodies

    To ask the Secretary of State for Employment how many of the public bodies for which he is responsible hold meetings in public; and if he will list them.

    The following public bodies meetings in public:

    • Industrial Tribunals
    • Employment Appeal Tribunal
    • Civil Service Arbitration Tribunal
    • Central Arbitration Committee (for hearings into complaints about non disclosure of information).

    To ask the Secretary of State for Employment, pursuant to his reply of 6 July, Official Report, columns 107–8, whether he takes into account the interests of chairpersons and members of the boards of executive non-departmental public bodies when making appointments to these bodies; and what steps he takes to identify relevant interests.

    Yes, appropriate steps are taken to avoid a conflict of interests, depending on the appointment.

    Earnings

    To ask the Secretary of State for Employment on average in terms of percentage how much female (a) part-time and (b) full-time workers earn; and if he will make a statement.

    Information on the earnings of female part-time and full-time workers can be found in table 19 of part A of the new earnings survey, the 1992 edition of which can be found in the Library. Part A of the 1993 new earnings survey will be published in September.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Employment (1) what were the figures for average weekly earnings for (a) males and (b) females in (i) Scotland, (ii) Wales and (iii) England for 1979 and the latest year for which figures are available;(2) what were the figures for average weekly earnings for

    (a) males in manual work, (b) males in non-manual work, (c) females in manual work and (d) females in non-manual work in (i) Scotland, (ii) Wales and (iii) England for 1979 and the latest year for which figures are available.

    The information requested is published in tables 12 and 13 of part A of the new earnings survey for 1979 and 1992.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what were the figures for average hourly earnings for (a) males and (b) females in (i) Scotland, (ii) Wales and (iii) England for 1979 and for the latest year for which figures are available.

    The information requested is published in tables 122 and 123 of part E of the new earnings survey for 1979 and 1992.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Employment, pursuant to his answer to the hon. Member for Leeds, West (Mr. Battle) of 15 July, Official Report, columns 608–12, if he will provide for Scotland, Wales and each English region equivalent figures on earnings to those given in his answer.

    [holding answer 26 July 1993]: Information available from the new earnings survey can be found in the following tables.

    Average gross weekly earnings of part-time employees on adult rates-pay unaffected by absence: April 1992
    Manual (£)Non-manual(£)
    Greater London87·7127·5
    South East77·7113·1
    South West67·997·2
    West Midlands71·0100·8
    East Midlands70·195·1
    Yorkshire/Humberside70·897·2
    North West75·0100·7
    North69·193·0
    Scotland70·7108·1
    Wales69·4101·5
    Full time employees on adult rates—pay unaffected by absence Proportion with gross weekly earnings including overtime below the following amounts: April 1992
    Greater LondonSouth EastEast AngliaSouth WestWest MidlandsEast Midlands
    Manual men
    £1000·60·50·90·70·60·8
    £1505·15·97·19·68·39·0
    £20016·420·627·131·227·828·9
    £25035·741·852·755·752·753·4
    Non Manual men
    £1000·40·30·70·40·70·4
    £1501·72·44·54·64·24·3
    £2006·78·713·715·114·115·1
    £25015·117·827·926·226·628·3
    Manual women
    £1003·14·66·18·07·86·8
    £15022·632·250·449·049·052·6
    £20053·363·581·179·979·582·7
    £25074·881·293·691·592·991·9
    Non Manual women
    £1000·40·70·91·81·41·6
    £1503·36·816·417·018·717·2
    £20014·524·547·446·050·147·1
    £25034·045·665·964·867·265·1
    Yorkshire/ HumbersideNorth WestNorthScotlandWales
    Manual men
    £1000·80·50·80·40·7
    £1508·18·08·38·09·9
    £20027·027·525·927·131·4

    Yorkshire/ Humberside

    North West

    North

    Scotland

    Wales

    £25050·551·050·652·454·1

    Non Manual men

    £1000·80·40·50·40·5
    £1505·54·84·55·55·2
    £20016·114·613·615·215·4
    £25028·925·025·226·228·3

    Manual women

    £1008·39·25·36·47·6
    £15052·946·847·747·648·8
    £20080·179·076·778·681·4
    £25092·691·592·691·794·4

    Non Manual women

    £1001·41·21·71·32·1
    £15019·316·518·718·818·7
    £20047·745·748·647·846·4
    £25065·863·865·665·365·8

    Full time employees on adult rates—pay unaffected by absence Proportion with gross weekly earnings excluding overtime below the following amounts: April 1992

    Greater London

    South East

    East Anglia

    South West

    West Midlands

    East Midlands

    Manual men

    £1000·70·71·00·80·71·1
    £1506·98·211·814·013·014·5
    £20024·630·841·845·240·643·8
    £25050·658·771·472·769·371·6

    Non Manual men

    £1000·40·30·90·40·70·4
    £1501·92·85·45·55·05·5
    £2007·510·116·517·516·417·3
    £25017·420·331·529·029·931·7

    Manual women

    £1003·25·17·68·58·67·0
    £15026·037·254·553·853·858·2
    £20060·070·788·386·585·988·4
    £25081·387·298·195·095·796·6

    Non Manual women

    £1000·40·70·92·11·41·6
    £1503·67·417·718·320·318·6
    £20015·726·349·148·352·048·9
    £25035·847·568·266·869·066·8

    Yorkshire/ Humberside

    North West

    North

    Scotland

    Wales

    Manual men

    £1000·90·61·00·50·9
    £15013·612·212·112·714·8
    £20042·242·337·942·644·0
    £25069·568·366·270·069·9

    Non Manual men

    £1000·80·50·50·40·7
    £1506·65·65·56·46·3
    £20018·817·215·617·118·0
    £25032·028·028·229·131·2

    Manual women

    £1009·19·87·27·38·1
    £15058·352·353·352·755·1
    £20087·684·682·884·886·3
    £25097·395·395·395·296·3

    Non Manual women

    £1001·51·31·81·52·4

    Yorkshire/ Humberside

    North West

    North

    Scotland

    Wales

    £15020·417·919·920·720·4
    £20049·948·251·350·148·0
    £25067·665·767·966·966·6

    Full time employees on adult rates—pay unaffected by absence Proportion with gross hourly earnings excluding overtime below the following amounts: April 1992

    Greater London

    South East

    East Anglia

    South West

    West Midlands

    East Midlands

    Manual men

    £2·500·50·40·60·70·70·9
    £3·001·71·52·12·82·63·3
    £3·503·94·55·57·77·88·5
    £4·008·510·917·319·016·718·4
    £4·5014·919·228·030·325·929·1
    £5·0023·229·241·242·727·040·5
    £5·5031·039·453·354·949·153·6
    £6·5051·359·872·472·269·071·9

    Non Manual men

    £2·500·20·20·60·20·40·4
    £3·000·40·51·30·91·10·9
    £3·500·91·43·22·93·13·2
    £4·001·83·16·66·06·26·3
    £4·503·45·510·410·19·710·5
    £5·005·68·415·115·014·815·3
    £5·508·511·721·220·620·521·0
    £6·5015·519·431·128·531·032·0

    Manual women

    £2·502·93·23·32·44·43·2
    £3·006·88·515·015·216·416·4
    £3·5017·221·937·036·635·539·5
    £4·0027·139·057·355·154·961·2
    £4·5042·054·172·869·868·975·1
    £5·0056·867·185·881·880·984·4
    £5·5069·676·789·089·188·590·6
    £6·5082·388·397·294·595·996·2

    Non Manual men

    £2·500·30·30·30·70·50·6
    £3·000·50·81·52·52·62·4
    £3·501·43·18·68·79·08·8
    £4·003·36·816·516·418·717·5
    £4·506·112·327·125·729·828·0
    £5·0010·319·140·838·843·540·0
    £5·5015·426·852·949·254·250·5
    £6·5029·342·367·663·567·164·6

    Yorkshire/ Humberside

    North West

    North

    Scotland

    Wales

    Manual men

    £2·500·80·40·90·70·7
    £3·002·62·62·82·32·7
    £3·507·37·37·77·58·3
    £4·0017·216·014·917·017·3
    £4·5027·927·023·628·428·1
    £5·0039·638·434·039·940·7
    £5·5052·450·146·152·552·9
    £6·5070·768·466·370·869·1

    Non manual men

    £2·500·50·30·40·20·5
    £3·001·21·01·11·01·4
    £3·504·03·03·53·53·8
    £4·007·55·87·07·17·4
    £4·5011·39·710·010·511·9
    £5·0016·814·614·115·115·8
    £5·5022·019·319·020·321·5
    £6· 5032·127·827·729·931·6

    Yorkshire/ Humberside

    North West

    North

    Scotland

    Wales

    Manual women

    £2·503·25·24·43·53·3
    £3·0017·517·317·516·614·6
    £3·5041·035·137·737·634·1
    £4·0059·352·956·754·456·9
    £4·5072·168·069·569·970·2
    £5·0082·579·879·381·081·0
    £5·5090·287·086·289·987·5
    £6·5097·194·895·694·995·7

    Non manual women

    £2·500·80·51·20·60·8
    £3·003·02·73·52·33·6
    £3·5010·77·910·210·19·6
    £4·0019·315·319·918·317·4
    £4·5030·325·430·928·628·9
    £5·0040·836·643·238·939·0
    £5·5051·147·955·150·948·5
    £6·5065·962·769·163·964·2

    Part time employees on adult rates—pay unaffected by absence Proportion with gross hourly earnings excluding overtime below the following amounts: April 1992

    Greater London

    South East

    East Anglia

    South West

    West Midlands

    East Midlands

    Manual men

    £2·5012·120·0
    £3·0029·036·7
    £3·5053·264·4
    £4·0070·275·6
    £4·5077·486·7
    £5·0080·688·9
    £5·5089·594·4
    £6·5091·997·8

    Non manual men

    £2·50
    £3·00
    £3·50
    £4·00
    £4·50
    £5·00
    £5·50
    £6·50

    Manual women

    £2·503·26·15·07·77·18·2
    £3·009·214·918·626·626·926·5
    £3·5018·937·647·359·658·960·6
    £4·0032·857·463·276·280·974·7
    £4·5060·775·970·984·987·482·7
    £5·0077·685·979·591·792·890·4
    £5·5086·291·582·995·795·893·1
    £6·5093·396·289·197·898·296·5

    Non manual women

    £2·501·61·71·91·52·71·6
    £3·003·04·06·76·48·46·1
    £3·508·216·222·729·831·129·5
    £4·0015·928·737·943·944·646·6
    £4·5028·742·354·556·757·058·3
    £5·0041·054·267·166·966·570·6
    £5·5048·962·674·073·673·177·5
    £6·5064·074·383·582·781·685·3

    Yorkshire/ Humberside

    North West

    North

    Scotland

    Wales

    Manual men

    £2·5011·19·8
    £3·0034·330·3
    £3·5058·647·5
    £4·0069·763·1

    Yorkshire/ Humberside

    North West

    North

    Scotland

    Wales

    £4·5075·872·1
    £5·0085·979·5
    £5·5089·985·2
    £6·5094·991·8

    Non manual men

    £2·50
    £3·00
    £3·50
    £4·00
    £4·50
    £5·00
    £5·50
    £6·50

    Manual women

    £2·505·56·55·86·5
    £3·0023·920·727·125·2
    £3·5049·851·865·158·1
    £4·0074·773·181·477·6
    £4·5084·683·687·387·7
    £5·0091·790·092·893·6
    £5·5095·094·094·695·3
    £6·5097·596·996·297·4

    Non manual women

    £2·502·51·72·22·93·7
    £3·007·66·17·77·28·6
    £3·5028·728·132·129·333·3
    £4·0045·140·744·738·447·4
    £4·5058·455·454·651·158·2
    £5·0068·764·966·159·367·0
    £5·5076·272·675·467·473·9
    £6·5084·781·585·377·682·4

    Full time employees on adult rates—pay unaffected by absence Proportion with gross hourly earnings including overtime below the following amounts: April 1992

    Greater London

    South East

    East Anglia

    South West

    West Midlands

    East Midlands

    Manual men

    £2·500·40·40·40·70·60·7
    £3·001·61·51·92·62·42·8
    £3·503·74·04·56·86·66·9
    £4·007·69·212·815·714·114·7
    £4·5013·216·724·027·123·225·5
    £5·0021·226·537·539·233·836·6
    £5·5029·436·549·151·546·449·8
    £6·5049·957·369·670·066·569·1

    Non Manual men

    £2·500·20·20·60·20·40·4
    £3·000·40·41·20·91·10·9
    £3·500·91·33·02·82·92·8
    £4·001·72·96·25·65·95·9
    £4·503·25·29·89·79·210·1
    £5·005·38·014·714·114·214·8
    £5·508·311·320·319·919·620·1
    £6·5014·818·729·527·930·030·8

    Manual women

    £2·502·72·92·82·44·23·0
    £3·006·58·112·614·415·915·8
    £3·5015·820·535·434·834·237·6
    £4·0025·836·854·553·853·459·5
    £4·5041·152·571·167·467·673·5
    £5·0056·166·182·980·679·983·6
    £5·5068·375·488·688·188·189·9
    £6·0081·787·695·994·595·695·8

    Non Manual women

    £2·500·20·30·30·70·40·5
    £3·000·50·81·52·32·52·3
    £3·501·43·18·58·58·68·7

    Greater London

    South East

    East Anglia

    South West

    West Midlands

    East Midlands

    £4·003·26·616·616·018·317·1
    £4·506·012·026·625·329·427·6
    £5·0010·218·840·438·142·939·4
    £5·5015·426·552·548·753·449·9
    £6·5028·841·866·962·766·464·2

    Yorkshire/ Humberside

    North West

    North

    Scotland

    Wales

    Manual men

    £2·500·60·40·80·60·5
    £3·002·32·22·61·92·3
    £3·506·16·36·56·47·2
    £4·0013·813·213·013·514·6
    £4·5024·123·321·624·225·2
    £5·0036·034·731·536·136·9
    £5·5048·246·943·949·649·9
    £6·5067·666·164·167·666·9

    Non manual men

    £2·500·50·30·40·20·4
    £3·001·00·91·11·01·1
    £3·503·62·93·13·33·5
    £4·006·95·46·96·57·1
    £4·5010·69·19·59·811·3
    £5·0016·014·013·614·315·3
    £5·5021·318·717·819·520·7
    £6·5031·226·926·729·030·9

    Manual women

    £2·503·05·04·23·23·3
    £3·0016·616·217·516·014·4
    £3·5039·533·937·235·831·7
    £4·0057·551·255·252·653·7
    £4·5069·667·068·268·268·6
    £5·0080·978·778·879·679·7
    £5·5089·385·885·288·987·3
    £6·5096·294·495·694·795·7

    Non manual women

    £2·500·80·51·20·50·7
    £3·002·92·53·42·33·6
    £3·5010·37·610·09·49·2
    £4·0019·114·819·417·817·3
    £4·5030·125·230·328·128·2
    £5·0040·335·942·038·438·4
    £5·5050·647·053·649·848·1
    £6·5065·362·168·663·663·9

    Part time employees on adult rates—pay unaffected by absence Proportion with gross hourly earnings including overtime below the following amounts: April 1992

    Greater London

    South East

    East Anglia

    South West

    West Midlands

    East Midlands

    Manual men

    £2·5011·320·0
    £3·0028·236·7
    £3·5054·064·4
    £4·0070·275·6
    £4·5077·485·6
    £5·0080·688·9
    £5·5089·594·4
    £6·5091·198·9

    Non Manual men

    £2·50
    £3·00
    £3·50
    £4·00
    £4·50
    £5·00
    £5·50
    £6·50

    Greater London

    South East

    East Anglia

    South West

    West Midlands

    East Midlands

    Manual women

    £2·503·46·05·07·57·08·2
    £3·009·214·717·826·026·626·3
    £3·5018·637·146·559·858·859·6
    £4·0032·156·762·475·680·374·2
    £4·5060·675·970·985·687·382·4
    £5·0076·885·979·592·692·590·6
    £5·5086·291·783·395·595·893·1
    £6·5093·396·489·597·798·296·5

    Non Manual women

    £2·501·61·71·71·52·71·5
    £3·003·04·06·56·28·35·9
    £3·508·116·021·929·830·928·1
    £4·0015·528·437·243·745·046·0
    £4·5028·842·154·856·756·858·0
    £5·004·1054·167·366·966·570·4
    £5·5048·762·674·073·973·277·7
    £6·5063·974·483·382·681·785·4

    Yorkshire/ Humberside

    North West

    North

    Scotland

    Wales

    Manual men

    £2·5011·19·0
    £3·0034·329·5
    £3·5058·648·4
    £4·0069·761·5
    £4·5076·873·0
    £5·0085·980·3
    £5·5089·986·1
    £6·5096·091·8

    Non manual men

    £2·50
    £3·00
    £3·50
    £4·00
    £4·50
    £5·00
    £5·50
    £6·50

    Manual women

    £2·505·56·55·66·6
    £3·0023·220·526·925·3
    £3·5049·651·464·958·0
    £4·0074·571·881·276·9
    £45084·683·087·587·6
    £5·0092·290·292·493·4
    £5·5095·593·394·295·3
    £6·5097·797·196·497·4

    Non manual women

    £2·502·51·62·22·93·7
    £3·007·35·87·57·48·6
    £3·5028·527·331·028·132·7
    £4·0044·540·544·437·747·7
    £4·5058·255·554·950·558·4
    £5·5076·272·875·667·374·5
    £6·5084·781·585·277·782·4

    Maternity Rights

    To ask the Secretary of State for Emploument when his Department intends to implement the maternity rights provisions of the Trade Union and Employment Rights Acts 1993.

    The provisions will be commenced by October 1994, as the Ec pregnant workers directive requires.

    Unemployment, East Midlands

    To ask the Secretary of State for Employment how many people in the east midlands have been unemployed for a year or longer.

    In April 1993 and on the unadjusted basis, 65,699 claimants had been unemployed for over a year in the east midlands region.In winter 1992–93, also on the unadjusted basis, the number unemployed over a year according to the International Labour Organisation definition stood at 73,000.

    Training And Enterprise Councils

    To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what percentage of people in Rochdale who have completed TEC-run training courses entered full-time employment in each of the last two years.

    The information is given in the table:

    Youth training/employment training—percentage of those completing their training entering full-time employment Rochdale training and enterprise council April 1990 to September 1992
    Youth training1 Per cent.Employment training Per cent.
    April 1990 to March 19917641
    April 1991 to March 199274n/a
    April 1992 to September 199261n/a

    Source: YT follow-up survey, ET follow-up survey.

    Notes:

    1 Includes Youth Training and Youth Credits, April 1991 to September 1992 information is provisional.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what has been the total gross public expenditure on training and enterprise councils for each year since 1989–90, and projected expenditure for the years up to 1995–96, in 1991–92 prices.

    I will write to the hon. Member and place a copy of my letter in the Library.

    Employment Statistics

    To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what assessment he has made of the methods used in the compiling of employment statistics.

    A thorough review of the methods used in compiling employment statistics was conducted by the Department in 1988. As a result, my predecessors authorised a number of initiatives to improve the quality of the statistics. These included the introduction of a quarterly labour force survey in 1992; the first full census of employers for 12 years, in September this year; and the co-development with the Central Statistical Office of a new register of businesses which will be fully operational in 1995.

    Pit Closures

    To ask the Secretary of State for Employment if he will make a statement on the level of unemployment in the travel-to-work areas where collieries have closed; and what initiatives the Government are currently taking to provide jobs in those areas.

    Between January and June 1993, claimant unemployment fell in all those travel-to-work areas containing collieries where British Coal has ceased operations since October 1992.The Government have made available £75 million to training and enterprise councils and the Employment Service to provide a range of training, job search and other measures to help the unemployed people affected. This £75 million forms part of a larger £200 million package of assistance involving the Employment Department, the Department of Trade and Industry, British Coal Enterprise, English Estates and other Government agencies.

    Social Chapter

    To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what discussions he has had with his European counterparts on the social chapter.

    The social chapter has not been a major topic in discussions with European Ministers. The interpretation, the extent and the use of the agreement of 11 on social policy are essentially matters for those member states who signed it.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Employment if he will list the publication, including details of price and availability, containing the text of (a) the social chapter, (b) the social charter signed by 11 Heads of State or Government at Strasbourg in 1979, (c) the social protocol and attached agreement and (d) documents referred to in texts (a) to (c) above or necessary for construing them; and if he will state for each document its publication date and the authority for its publication.

    I will write to the hon. Member and place a copy of my letter in the Library.

    Social Charter

    To ask the Secretary of State for Employment, pursuant to his answer of 22 July, at column 295, if he will now publish the text of the social charter signed in Strasbourg on 9 December 1989 by 11 member states of the European Community, together with a schedule of the consequential draft on effective regulations and directives with accompanying information concerning relevant security reports, debates and implementation.

    The text of the social charter was annexed to the unnumbered explanatory memorandum submitted to the parliamentary scrutiny Committees by the Employment Department on 24 November 1989. The text of each Commission proposal under the social action programme has been deposited in Parliament and explanatory memoranda in each case have been prepared for the scrutiny Committees. All the information requested by the hon. Member is therefore already in the public domain.

    Unemployment, South-East Essex

    To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what intiatives he is taking to assist the long-term unemployed in south-east Essex.

    Long-term unemployed people in south-east Essex have access to a range of opportunities specifically aimed to give them the help they need to get back to work. These include Restart, job clubs, the job interview guarantee, training for work, and job plan workshops.We have also recently introduced learning for work, community action and an expanded business start-up scheme for