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Written Answers

Volume 234: debated on Thursday 16 December 1993

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Written Answers To Questions

Thursday, 16 December, 1993

Trade And Industry

Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant

To ask the President of the Board of Trade what formal or informal approaches Her Majesty's Government have received from Governments of nations with utilities with a contract with British Nuclear Fuels plc for the use of THORP, to cancel or vary the contract or its terms; and what steps have been taken to alert other departments.

Dry Cleaning

To ask the President of the Board of Trade what research he has commissioned and what grants he has offered for research on future dry cleaning technology from OTEC (MSG) Ltd.; and if he will place the conclusions of that research in the Library.

OTEC is a subsidiary of Master Services Group—MSG—which leads a project assisted'by a Department of Trade and Industry grant under DEMOS —DTI's environmental management options scheme. The grant fo £134,332 over 13 months is in support of the research and development of a hydrocarbon non-halogenated fluid as a possible replacement for CFC 113, a solvent used in the dry-cleaning industry. Production of CFC 113 is to be phased out by 1 January 1995.A summary of the results of the project will be issued in late 1994 for the benefit of the dry cleaning industry, and will be placed in the Librry of the House.

Solvents

To ask the President of the Board of Trade what compliance tests were carried out on European regulations to phase out the use of solvent 113; who conducted these tests; and what alternative solvents or technologies were recommended.

My Department commissioned consultants Touche Ross to carry out a study into the effect of phase out of CFC 113—solvent 113—in the solvent-using sector. Copies of its report "The use of CFC 113 and 1,1,1 trichloroethane as solvents in UK industry" dated October 1992 were placed in the Library of the House.My Department has also produced a free leaflet entitled "Ozone Depleting Solvents. CFC Phase Out: Advice on Alternatives and Guidelines for Users", which is also in the Library of the House, and has supported a nationwide series of seminars organised by the Engineering Employers Federation to advise users on the range of alternatives.

Research And Development

To ask the President of the Board of Trade what was the spending on research and development in each of the last five years given in 1992–93 prices in his Department.

The Department of Trade and Industry's expenditure on research and development is recorded in the "Annual Review of Government Funded Research and Development", copies of which are placed in the Library of the House. Table 1.2.3. of the latest edition shows DTI expenditure on research and development from 1987–88, based on 1991–92 prices. Revised figures, based on 1992–93 prices, will be published in the 1994 forward look of science and technology, which replaces the annual review.

British Nuclear Fuels Plc

To ask the President of the Board of Trade when he expects BNFL to publish its accounts for 1992–93; and what reasons it has given for the delay.

BNFL will file its accounts for 1992–93 within the period allowed by the Companies Act 1985, as amended, for laying and delivering accounts. In accordance with section 244 of the Act, BNFL has claimed and been granted a three-month extension to this period on the ground that it is a company which carries on business or has interests outside the United Kingdom, Channel Islands and the Isle of Man. The accounts are now due to be delivered to Companies House on or before 31 January 1994.

To ask the President of the Board of Trade what are the average annual running costs of BNFL plants at (a) Capenhurst, (b) Springfields, (c) Chapelcross, (d) Sellafield and (e) Calderhall.

Press Releases

To ask the President of the Board of Trade how many press releases his Department has issued in each year since 1979.

The following numbers of press notices were issued by the Department for the years requested.

YearNumber of noticesDepartment
1979897Department of Trade, Department of Industry and Department of Consumer Protection
1980937Department of Trade and Department of Industry
1981944Department of Trade and Department of Industry
19821,039Department of Trade and Department of Industry
1983956Department of Trade, Department of Industryand subsequently, from June 1983, the merged Department of Trade and Industry
1984762Department of Trade and Industry
1985839Department of Trade and Industry
1986931Department of Trade and Industry
1987816Department of Trade and Industry
1988944Department of Trade and Industry
1989876Department of Trade and Industry
YearNumber of noticesDepartment
1990799Department of Trade and Industry
1991724Department of Trade and Industry
1992838Department of Trade and Industry, including Department of Energy from April
1993745Department of Trade and Industry, including Department of Energy from April, up to 14 December

Bankruptcies

To ask the President of the Board of Trade how many companies have been declared bankrupt each year since 1989, including that year.

Information on company insolvencies is regularly published by the Association of British Chambers of Commerce, on behalf of the Department of Trade and Industry, in "Business Briefing", copies are available in the Library of the House. The figures concerned were most recently published in the edition dated 5 November.

Administration

To ask the President of the Board of Trade what was the total expenditure by his Department on administration in 1992–93; what is the estimated outturn for expenditure by his Department on administration for 1993–94 in (i) cash terms and (ii) real terms in, 1992–93 prices; and what is his estimate for expenditure on administration by his Department for 1994–95 in (a) cash terms and(b) 1992–93 prices.

The final outturn for the recurrent costs of running the Department in 1992–93 is £291.2 million. The running costs limit for 1993–94 is £330.6 million. An estimated outturn will be published in the spring in the 1994 departmental report and the unified Budget supplement. The Department's planned running costs expenditure for 1994–95 will be published in the unified Budget supplement.

Electricity Licences

To ask the President of the Board of Trade what plans he has to relax the conditions of the order which exempts companies from the requirement to hold an electricity generation or supply licence.

Following consultations with the Director General of Electricity Supply, electricity companies and other interested parties, I have decided to amend the Electricity (Class Exemptions from the Requirement for a Licence) Order 1990 to reduce the regulatory burden on small generators, own generators and consumers who sell on a small proportion of the electricity they purchase.The changes will be made as early as possible in 1994, I expect the changes to be broadly as follows, subject to considering the detailed technical amendments that will be required to achieve our aims.At present, small generators require a generation licence unless each of their generating stations provides not more than 10 MW, disregarding power going to certain qualifying customers on site. I will extend this exemption to cover generating stations which have a capacity of less than 100 MW and provide more than 10 MW but not more than 50 MW, disregarding power going to certain qualifying customers on site.At present, a consumer without an electricity supply licence may resell electricity to franchise customers if that electricity was originally purchased from the local public electricity supplier or in certain cases a second tier supplier. I propose to extend the exemption to allow the resale of electricity purchased from a second tier supplier to any franchise customers located on the reseller's site —this subject to overall limits based on the proportion and aggregate amount resold; these are expected to be 10 per cent. and 250 MWH per site respectively. I am also minded to exempt the resale of electricity purchased from an own generator subject to the same conditions and limitations.The existing exemptions for own generators and deminimis generators allow for the provision of electricity to qualifying groups of companies. I propose to allow more companies to be included in such qualifying groups by reducing the proportion of shares required to be held in a company for it to qualify as a subsidiary forming part of a qualifying group. I am also examining how we might allow certain joint venture companies to be included in a qualifying group. At present, an own generator requires a supply licence unless at least 51 per cent. of the electricity from his generating station goes to qualifying customers located on the own generator's site. I will remove this condition. In future, the proportion of electricity provided to particular customers will not be a factor in determining whether a supply licence is needed.At present, most generators who are exempt from the need for a generation licence but who have stations over 200 KW capacity must notify the Secretary of State of their name and address. I will remove that requirement.These changes will encourage own generators and others by reducing the regulatory burden with which they must contend.In addition, the Director General has granted a full second tier supply licence to Nuclear Electric. This will help to promote competition in the provision of electricity supply contracts to non franchise customers.The Government recognise the concern that rises in pool prices have caused, particularly to those large users who are on pool related contracts. The Director General of Electricity Supply has investigated the matter. He has carried forward work on the costs and margins of National Power and PowerGen and other relevant issues and has concluded that further steps need to be taken to ensure that customers are protected in future and to allow the satisfactory development of the industry. Discussions with the companies are continuing and he anticipates being able to decide by mid January whether a Monopolies and Mergers Commission reference is required.In their White Paper "The Prospects for Coal", the Government said that they would consider whether allowing large users to trade outside the electricity pool would be beneficial to the electricity market.The responses to my Department's consultation paper on dedicated generation established that there were many practical problems to be overcome if a workable dedicated generation scheme were to be found which would not disadvantage other consumers. The Government have concluded that they should not proceed with amendments to the order which would allow an interim scheme to operate within the electricity pool.

I have, therefore, asked the Director General of Electricity Supply to look further into the possibility of trading outside the pool and to report on this by 30 June 1994. He has agreed.

European Economic Area

To ask the President of the Board of Trade when the European economic area will enter into force.

Following ratification of the European Economic Area—EEA—agreement by all EC member states and participating states of the European Free Trade Association the Community formally concluded the EEA at the ECOFIN Council on 13 December. This means that the European Economic Area will enter into force on 1 January 1994.The European Economic Area agreement extends most of the EC's single market to five states of the European Free Trade Association: Austria, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden; Liechtenstein may join later. The United Kingdom ratified the EEA on 15 November 1993.

Remote Sensing

To ask the President of the Board of Trade what proposals he has for a legal national regime in which remote sensing can be accommodated; and what plans he has to develop an international regime in which the interests of have-not technology states can be accommodated.

[holding answer 15 December 1993]: I have no plans to add to the provisions of existing legislation including those of the Outer Space Act 1986. United Nations resolution 41/65 of 3 December 1986 creates an international framework within which the International Committee on Earth Observation Satellites, of which the British National Space Centre is a member, is at present exploring mechanisms for the closer involvement of developing countries.

Nuclear Power

To ask the President of the Board of Trade what progress he has made in preparing for the Government's review of the future prospects for nuclear power in the United Kingdom; and if he will make a statement.

In their White Paper "The Prospects for Coal", CM 2235, the Government undertook to bring forward work on their review of the future prospects for nuclear power and to make a further announcement later this year.The Government have received a considerable number of representations about the review from hon. Members, members of the public, the nuclear industry and other interested parties, both on the areas which the review should cover and on the way in which the review should be conducted. In addition, the Trade and Industry Select Committee made recommendations in its report "British Energy Policy and the Market for Coal"—HC 237—earlier this year.The Government are carefully considering these representations as part of their preparatory work on the review. Some of the issues identified in the context of this work are the extent to which nuclear power is now competitive; the present economics of nuclear power generation; nuclear power's contribution to diversity and security of supply; and environmental aspects of nuclear power.We will announce the precise terms of reference for the review, and how it will be conducted, as soon as possible.

Lord Chancellor's Department

Commercial Property Law

To ask the Parliamentary Secretary, Lord Chancellor's Department when he intends to bring forward legislation to put into effect the reports announced on 31 March to implement most of the Law Commissioner's recommendations for reforming the law on commercial property leases.

Legislation to give effect to the Government's decision to implement the recommendations in the Law Commission's report, "Landlord and Tenant Law: Privity of Contract and Estate"—Law Corn. No. 174—for all future leases including commercial leases but not for existing leases, will be introduced as soon as there is a suitable opportunity.

Judges

To ask the Parliamentary Secretary, Lord Chancellor's Department if he will introduce requirements for all judges to undergo comprehensive medical and psychological examinations prior to appointment and thereupon annually.

High Court judges, circuit judges and district judges are required to undergo a medical examination as a condition of their appointment. In addition, medical examinations of serving judges are undertaken when appropriate. The Lord Chancellor has no plans to revise the current requirements.

Special Ministerial Advisers

To ask the Parliamentary Secretary, Lord Chancellor' s Department (1) what arrangements are made to ensure that special advisers to Ministers in his Department do not have access to the kind of information, and are not involved in the type of business, that would be likely to create suspicion of impropriety in relation to subsequent employment;(2) if he will list the names and job descriptions of each special ministerial adviser employed in his Department showing any particular outputs for which each adviser is responsible.

There are no special advisers to Ministers in the Lord Chancellor's Department.

Departmental Offices (Heating Bills)

To ask the Parliamentary Secretary, Lord Chancellor's Department if he will list, by location the annual fuel heating bills for each of his Department's offices for the last four years, and for this year to date.

The Department's courts and offices are organised administratively into six circuits, the Supreme Court group and headquarters. The total expenditure for the last two financial years and year to date are as follows:

Location1991–921992–931993–94
£££
Circuits
Midland and Oxford1,047,150991,539456,937
North Eastern596,478692,134230,214
Northern640,705714,775409,274
South Eastern2,514,2682,338,134668,232
Wales and Chester315,991300,854206,347
Western332,923455,838192,910
Supreme Court643,157640,979237,755
Headquarters421,374399,934218,899
TOTAL6,512,0466,534,1872,620,568
Details of expenditure incurred prior to 1991–92 are not held centrally. A detailed list of expenditure in each individual court and office has been placed in the House of Commons Library.

Clean-Break Settlements

To ask the Parliamentary Secretary, Lord Chancellor's Department how many clean-break settlements have been agreed in divorce cases since the inception of the Child Support Agency.

i. Live TV Link Applications (s.32 Criminal Justice Act 1988).Implementation 5 January 1989.
Age Unknown1Under 14Under 17Mixed age rangeTotal number of cases
1992
1 January-30 September 1992
Granted229229
Refused99
1992
1 October-31 December 1992
Granted (or case disposed of prior to trial)6012779
Refused0000
1993
1 January-to date
Granted (or case disposed of prior to trial)27012057447
Refused84214
1 Prior to the implementation of the Criminal Justice Act 1991 the age of the child was not recorded. The 'Mixed age range' column includes those cases where the child witnesses spanned both age ranges.
ii. Pre-Recorded Video Interview Application (s.32A Criminal Justice Act 1988, as inserted by s.54 Criminal Justice Act 1991). Implementation 1 October 1992.
Under 14Under 17Mixed age rangeTotal number of cases
1992
1 October-31 December 1992
Granted (or case disposed of prior to trial)4217
Refused0000
1993
1 January-to date
Granted (or case disposed of prior to trial)1224232196
Refused4015

This information is not available and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Children (Court Appearances)

To ask the Parliamentary Secretary, Lord Chancellor's Department how many court cases there have been in each of the last two years involving children (a) under 17 years and (b) under 14 years; how many of these children requested the use of (i) video link, (ii) video recording and (iii) the use of screens in court; and how many requests were granted.

The information sought by the hon. Member on the total number of criminal cases involving children in the last two years has not been collated, and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost. The tables give the information sought with regard to the usage of live television link equipment, pre-recorded video evidence and screens in criminal cases in the Crown court. In non-criminal cases, existing legislation does not allow for either television links or pre-recorded video evidence to be used, and the information sought with regard to the use of screens is not collated.

iii. Applications to use Screens

Under 14

Under 17

Mixed age range

Total number of cases

1993

Granted19241154
Refused0000
Note: Applications to use screens were not recorded prior to 1 January 1993.

High Court Judges

To ask the Parliamentary Secretary, Lord Chancellor's Department what was the number of High Court judges who are (a) Asian and (b) black, on 1 December.

As at 1 December 1993, there were 94 High Court judges. The ethnic origin of those appointed as High Court judges has not been recorded formally in the past, but it is known that none is black or Asian.

Press Releases

To ask the Parliamentary Secretary, Lord Chancellor's Department how many press releases his Department has issued in each year since 1979.

The Lord Chancellor's Department issued 170 press releases in 1986; 147 in 1987; 182 in 1988; 175 in 1989; 206 in 1990; 245 in 1991; and 333 in 1992. A total of 297 have been issued to 14 December in 1993. There are no records of press releases before 1986.

Immigration

To ask the Parliamentary Secretary, Lord Chancellor's Department how many adjudicators there are (a) at first instance and (b) on appeal dealing with immigration cases; how many are (i) full-time and (ii) part-time, and how many are (1) black, (2) Asian and (3) female.

There are dealing with immigration cases (a) 116 immigration adjudicators at first instance and (b) 12 legal members and 27 lay members on appeal.Of the immigration adjudicators at first instance, 16 are full time and 100 are part time; three are black, four are Asian and 23 are female.Of the members of the Immigration Appeal Tribunal, three are full time and 36 are part time; four are black, six are Asian and 14 are female.

Administration

To ask the Parliamentary Secretary, Lord Chancellor's Department what was the total expenditure by his Department on administration in 1992–93; what is the estimated outturn for expenditure by his Department on administration for 1993–94 in (i) cash terms and (ii) real terms in, 1992–93 prices; and what is his estimate for expenditure on administration by his Department for 1994–95 in (a) cash terms and (b) 1992–93 prices.

The total expenditure by the Lord Chancellor's Department on running costs for 1992–93,

estimated outturn for 1993–94 and plans for 1994–95 in (i) cash terms and (ii) real terms (in 1992–93 prices) are shown in the table:

£'000

1992–93

1993–94

1994–95

Cash terms396,548419,000427,000
1992–93 prices396,548405,811397,653

Expenditure Review

To ask the Parliamentary Secretary, Lord Chancellor's Department what will be the terms of reference of the Lord Chancellor's Department proposed fundamental review of expenditure by his Department.

The Government announced in February 1993 that they would conduct in-depth reviews of all public spending by every department of state. The work will examine long-term trends in spending on individual programmes to assess whether they are sustainable, and seek out areas from which the state might withdraw altogether or where better targeting is now appropriate. The "Financial Statement and Budget Report" laid before the House of Commons on 30 November 1993 mentioned that the next batch of reviews would cover, among others, the legal departments.The terms of reference of the review will be to:

  • (a) assess whether the trends in expenditure on courts and legal services are sustainable and advise what must be done if they are not;
  • (b) consider whether public expenditure by the legal departments in England and Wales has a clear purpose, whether the purpose is right for the 1990s and if so whether it is being pursued cost effectively.
  • The review team will make its first report to the Lord Chancellor by June 1994.

    Public Accounts Commission

    Quangos

    To ask the Chairman of the Public Accounts Commission, what plans exist to modernise audit and accountability arrangements for Government and quangos.

    The Comptroller and Auditor General is the statutory auditor of all Government Departments, executive agencies, and of a wide range of other public sector bodies. In addition, he audits the accounts of some other public sector organisations by agreement. For all these bodies, the Comptroller and Auditor General reports to Parliament.The Comptroller and Auditor General is also the auditor of some 50 per cent. of executive non-departmental public bodies. For other non-departmental public bodies the auditor, normally from the private sector, is appointed by the responsible Secretary of state. The accounts of these bodies are laid before parliament.Recent reviews of the financial audit methods of the National Audit Office suggest that they are comparable with best practice in the auditing profession in the United kingdom.

    National Heritage

    Arts Expenditure

    To ask Secretary of State for National Heritage What has been public expenditure on the arts in real terms in each year since 1979.

    Government funding for the arts is mainly provided through the Arts Council. Since 1979, its grant in aid in each year has been, in 1979–80 prices

    £000s
    1979–8063,125
    1980–8159,980
    1981–8261,995
    1982–8365,678
    1983–8466,053
    1984–8566,703
    1988–8665,771
    1966–8781,706
    1987–8879,689
    1988–8981,704
    1989–9077,940
    1990–9181,537
    1991–9284,711
    1992–9392,922
    1993–9491,799

    Arts Funding

    To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage how many meetings he has held with the Secretary of State for the Environment to discuss local authority funding of the arts; and when the meetings took place.

    I have had no bilateral meetings with the Secratary of State for the Environment specifically to discuss local authority funding for the arts, but my officials remain in contact with their colleagues in the Department of the Environment on this and other issues.

    Departmental Offices (Heating Bills)

    To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage if he will list by location the annual fuel heating bills for each of his Department's offices for the last four years, and for this year to date.

    My Department was established in April 1992. In the year 1992–93, the Department and its agencies spent £225,367 on identifiable heating costs. In the current year, we have spent £161,064 on identifiable costs. Costs are estimated in some cases where the new Department was a part-occupier of other Department's premises, or where energy costs refer also to other uses.The breakdown of costs is as follows:

    £
    1992–93
    Horseguards road2,441
    Grove house1,210
    Historic Royal Palaces Agency:
    Hampton court61,500
    Kensington Palace15,854
    Tower of London141,416
    Banquetting house2,946
    1993–94 to date
    Horseguards road274
    Grove house1,746
    Historic Royal Palances Agency:
    Hampton court53,700
    Kensington Palace8,175
    Tower of London97,169

    Time Zone

    To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage what representations his Department has received on the subject of Britain's time zone.

    My Department has received representations on a move to central European time from its sponsor bodies and various trade organisations. All have been in favour of such a change.

    To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage what studies his Department has commissioned on the effects of an extra hour of evening daylight on rates of participation in outdoor sports activities; and if he will make a statement.

    There has been no direct assessment of this kind. However the Sports Council, which is my Department's adviser on matters relating to sport and active recreation, takes the view that an additional hour of evening daylight would help to increase the opportunities for participation.

    To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage what estimate his Department has made of the likely effect on the British tourist industry of an extra hour of evening daylight all through the year; and if he will make a statement.

    There has been no direct assessment of this kind. However, the English tourist board, which is my Department's adviser on domestic tourism matters, takes the view that an additional hour of evening daylight would help to extend the tourist season by enabling many outdoor attractions to open to a later hour. Such a move would also promote greater employment opportunities.

    Commercial Television

    To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage what mechanism there is for taking into account when determining his policies towards the awarding of commercial television franchises and towards possible mergers and takeovers in commercial television the level of violence depicted on television.

    The licensing and regulation of commercial television are matters for the Independent Television Commission, which carries out the responsibilities laid on it by the Broadcasting Act 1990. All licensees, regardless of ownership, have to comply with the ITC programme code, which includes guidance on the portrayal of violence in programmes.

    Press Releases

    To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage how many press releases his Department has issued in 1992 and 1993.

    The Department of National Heritage was established in April 1992. Between April and December 1992, the Department issued 129 press notices. In 1993, to date, the Department has issued 177 press notices.

    Attorney-General

    Special Advisers

    To ask the Attorney-General if he will list the name and job description of each special ministerial adviser employed in his Department, showing any particular outputs for which each adviser is responsible.

    There are no special ministerial advisers employed in my Department.

    To ask the Attorney-General what arrangements are made to ensure that special advisers to Ministers in his Department do not have access to the kind of information, and are not involved in the type of business, that would be likely to create suspicion of impropriety in relation to subsequent employment.

    Bromley Social Services Department

    To ask the Attorney-General if the Crown Prosecution Service has yet reached a decision in respect of prosecution over the alleged fraud within the social services department of the London borough of Bromley; and if he will make a statement.

    No. The Metropolitan police have been asked to make further inquiries. When the result of those inquiries is known, the decision will be taken.

    Foreign And Commonwealth Affairs

    Sudan

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent representations have been made to the Government of Sudan on the subject of human rights and the rights to freedom of religious worship; and if he will make a statement.

    Her Majesty's ambassador in Khartoum takes every suitable opportunity, both bilaterally and in concert with other European Union heads of mission, to express our concern to the Sudanese authorities at reported abuses of human rights and fundamental freedoms, freedom of religion among them. We were active earlier this year in securing the appointment of a special rapporteur to investigate the human rights situation in Sudan. At the United Nations General Assembly, we co-sponsored a hard-hitting resolution in the third committee, commending the work of the special rapporteur, which was passed on 6 December by 102 votes to 11.

    Public Bodies

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what his Department's policy is regarding the use of executive search consultants in making appointments to public bodies; and if he will (a) list the appointments where such consultants have been used and (b) list the cost in each case since April 1992.

    Foreign and Commonwealth Office practice is not to make use of executive search consultants in making appointments to public bodies.

  • (a) Since April 1992 executive search consultants have not been used in making appointments to public bodies.
  • (b) None.
  • To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs which of the appointments made to public bodies by him since April 1992 have been advertised.

    Press Releases

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how many press releases his Department has issued in each year since 1979.

    The number of press releases issued per year by the FCO and ODA press offices is as follows:

    FCOODA
    1979176160
    1980168155
    1981221125
    1982169129
    1983138149
    1984120148
    1985142186
    1986163178
    1987168148
    1988120127
    1989177135
    1990263114
    1991221102
    1992182111
    1993189191
    1At 13 December 1993.

    Administration Costs

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what was the total expenditure by his Department on administration in 1992–93; what is the estimated outturn for expenditure by his Department on administration for 1993–94 in (i) cash terms and (ii) real terms, in 1992–93 prices; and what is his estimate for expenditure on administration by his Department for 1994–95 in (a) cash terms and (b) 1992–93 prices.

    The final outturn for the recurrent costs of running the Department in 1992–93 is:

    £ million
    FCO Diplomatic Wing520.976
    Overseas Development Administration45.650
    Total566.626
    The total running cost limit for 1993–94 in cash terms is:

    £million
    FCO Diplomatic Wing579.877
    Overseas Development Administration51.771
    Total631.648

    An estimated outturn will be published in the spring in the 1994 departmental report and the unified Budget supplement.Estimates of expenditure will be published in the spring in the 1994 departmental report and in the 1994–95 supply estimates.The GDP deflators required to calculate real terms figures are shown on page 121 of the "Financial Statement and Budget Report 1994–95", HC 31, copies of which are available in the Library of the House.

    Manchester United Supporters

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, pursuant to his answer of 10 December, Official Report, column 407, if there has yet been any response from the Turkish Government to the representations made by the British ambassador in Ankara in regard to the treatment of Manchester United supporters by the Turkish authorities; and if he will make a statement.

    The Turkish authorities have told the British ambassador in Ankara that a formal response to his representations would be available soon. My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs has also received a letter from the Turkish ambassador confirming this stressing that the Turkish authorities are taking the allegations very seriously.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, pursuant to his answer of 10 December, Official Report, column 407, if he has (a) met or (b) plans to meet the Turkish ambassador to discuss the allegations of mistreatment of Manchester United supporters by the Turkish authorities.

    My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs has not met the Turkish ambassador to discuss these allegations. However, I met him on 8 November. My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs wrote to the Turkish ambassador on 2 December with a list of the main allegations. We are currently awaiting his detailed response. When we have this we shall decide what further action should be taken.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, pursuant to his answer of 10 December, Official Report, column 407, what further action he now proposes to take in regard to the treatment of Manchester United supporters by the Turkish authorities.

    We have pressed for a report from the Turkish authorities. Further action will be considered in the light of that report.

    Education

    Further And Higher Education

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many educational institutions the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Further and Higher Education has visited during his first 12 months in office.

    I have visited a total of 67 educational institutions during my first 12 months in office, as follows:

    DateInstitutions visited
    Tuesday,15 DecemberRoyal Holloway and Bedford New College
    Monday,1 FebruaryBrooklands College
    Friday,12 FebruaryBeanfield Infant School, Corby;
    Beanfield Junior School, Corby;
    Brooke CTC, Corby
    Monday,15 FebruaryExeter University
    Friday, 19 FebruaryOpen University, Milton Keynes
    Friday, 26 FebruaryNew College, Oxford
    Monday, 8 MarchCoventry University
    Tuesday,16 MarchUniversity of West of England
    Friday, 19 MarchKirby College; University of Teeside
    Monday, 22 MarchEdge Hill College
    Friday, 26 MarchDaventry William Parker School
    Wednesday, 31 MarchHackney College
    Wednesday, 21 AprilCentral St. Martins School of Art
    Friday, 23 AprilBlackburn College;
    William Temple High School, Preston;
    North Cheshire College, Warrington
    Wednesday, 28 AprilUniversity of Westminister
    Friday, 30 AprilTresham College, Kettering
    Friday, 14 MayNorthampton School for Boys;
    Daventry Tertiary College
    Tuesday, 20 MayLondon Institute of Education
    Friday, 21 MaySt. Crispin's School;
    Reading University
    Saturday, 12 JuneNuffield College, Oxford
    Friday, 28 MayCampion School, Northants
    Friday, 4 JuneManchester College, Oxford
    Wednesday, 16 JuneSt. Vincent College, Gosport
    Friday,18 JuneBeachborough School
    Monday, 21 JuneADT College, Wandsworth
    Friday, 25 JuneChurchill College, Cambridge;
    Malvern Girls' College
    Wednesday, 30 JuneBerkshire College of Agriculture
    Friday, 2 JulyMagdalen College School, Brackley;
    Spoone School, Towester
    Tuesday, 8 JulySt. Antony's College, Oxford
    Tuesday, 20 JulySouth Bank University
    Wednesday, 21 JulyKeele University
    Tuesday, 17 AugustEurope Kolleg, Kassel, Germany
    Tuesday, 30 SeptemberNorth Oxfordshire College, Banbury
    Friday, 1 OctoberNene College, Northampton (and also Friday, 5 November)
    Wednesday, 6 OctoberBlackpool and Fylde College
    Tuesday, 7 OctoberBlackpool Sixth Form College
    Tuesday, 12 OctoberMartin-Luther-University, Halle, Germany;
    Leipzig University
    Wednesday, 13 OctoberTechnical College, Dresden;
    Teachers' Academy, Dresden
    Friday, 22 OctoberSparsholt College, Hampshire
    Wednesday, 27 OctoberLeeds Metropolitan University;
    University Of Leeds (Main Campus);
    University of Leeds, Bretton Hall;
    Birkbeck College
    DateInstitution Visited
    Sunday, 31 OctoberWorcester College, Oxford
    Monday, 1 NovemberEast Birmingham College;
    Bournville College
    Thursday, 11 NovemberFarnborough 6th Form College
    Monday, 15 NovemberWootton Bassett School, Wiltshire
    Wednesday, 17St. Martins' College, Lancaster;
    NovemberLancaster University
    Sunday, 21 NovemberOriel College, Oxford
    Friday, 19 NovemberGuilsborough School, Northants
    Thursday, 25 NovemberCambridge Regional College
    Friday, 26 NovemberUniversity of Luton
    Wednesday, 1 DecemberBonn University, Germany
    Thursday, 2 DecemberEuropean University Institute, Florence

    Nursery Education

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education for what reasons, at what legislative stage and by which procedure, the provisions contained in section 8(2)(b) of the Education Act 1944, concerning nursery education, were removed from the statute book.

    Section 8(2)(b) of the Education Act 1944 was repealed by section 38(6) and schedule 7 of the Education Act 1980, and provision was substituted by section 24 of that Act. This was designed to clarify the imprecise wording of the 1944 Act as regards the nature of any duty to provide nursery education. The 1980 Act established that, as indeed had generally been assumed to be the position, there was a discretionary power, but no duty, on local education authorities to provide either nursery schools or education in nursery classes for children under five.

    Examinations

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education what evidence he has of any correlation between a school's examination performance and the number of taught hours.

    Initial work carried out in the Department indicates on average a small but statistically significant positive correlation between the length of the taught week and educational performance as measured by public examinations and national tests. My right hon. Friend wrote to Her Majesty's chief inspector of schools in England on 9 December taking up his offer of help with a review of the length of the taught week and in particular asking for his advice on the relationship between the amount of taught time and the quality and standards of pupils' work; a copy of the letter, attached to DFE press notice 420/93, is in the Library. The chief inspector will be submitting an initial report by the end of January 1994.

    Degrees

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education what changes he plans in the balance of numbers of masters level and doctoral level degrees in the arts and humanities in line with the changes for science and technology courses announced in the White Paper "Realising our Potential"; if he will discuss this issue with the British Academy; and if he will make a statement.

    The British Academy implemented a revised structure for its awards for postgraduate research in the humanities at the start of the current academic year. This new structure is similar to that proposed in the White Paper "Realising our Potential" for courses in science and technology. For the 1993–94 academic year, the academy has made 529 new awards for study at masters level and 519 for doctoral study. It is for the academy to determine this balance.

    Environmentl Education Advisers

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will list the local education authorities that currently employ environmental education advisers and the ones that have ceased to do so over the last five years.

    Environmental Education

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) if he will make it his policy to ensure that all schools, in stating their moral values and outlining their general ethos, refer to the importance of their responsibility for the environment and the development of such awareness among their pupils;(2) how he intends to meet the requirements of "Agenda 21", objectives 36.5D, incentive training, E, local environmental studies and F promoting proven education methods with respect to estuaries;(3) if he will help to increase schools' awareness of estuarine sites of importance to wildlife by providing educational resources and training for the interpretation of estuaries;(4) what plans he has to set up pre-service and in-service training programmes for all teachers and educational planners to ensure delivery of environmental education as recommended at the Rio summit.

    Environmental education is addressed through the statutory subjects of the national curriculum: schools themselves are responsible for how environmental education is delivered. National curriculum geography includes study of rivers, river basins and seas; and requires that pupils are taught about the quality and vulnerability of different environments and the possibilities for protecting and managing them.Schools are free to include reference to the importance of their responsibilities for the environment and the development of such awareness among their pupils in the statement of the school's ethos and values included in their prospectuses, if they so wish.The Government provide specific grant to support expenditure on the national curriculum which is devolved mainly to schools to spend on books and equipment or training. It is for schools and LEAs to decide what priority to give to particular subject areas and to make detailed plans in the light of their own staff development needs.My right hon. Friend seeks to ensure, through his criteria for the approval of initial teacher training—ITT —that courses give a thorough preparation for teaching the national curriculum. The detailed content of courses is a matter for ITT providers and not the Government.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education what guidance he has issued to local education authorities, schools and institutions of further and higher education on those aspects of Agenda 21 dealing with education for sustainable development and the environment.

    None. A general Government strategy document on sustainable development is in preparation.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education what progress has been made in the implementation of the recommendation of the Toyne report: "Environmental Responsibility: An Agenda for Further and Higher Education".

    When the report was published in February 1993, I welcomed it as a valuable contribution to debate in an area which involved complex issues. The report's recommendations were addressed to the whole higher and further education sector, but particularly the institutions themselves and the funding councils. We therefore distributed the report to vice-chancellors of universities, principals of colleges and the chairmen of the funding councils, drawing the recipients' attention to the recommendations addressed to their institutions. Implementation of these is a matter for them.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will make it his policy to ensure that Office for Standards in Education inspectors comment on the quality of environmental education when compiling reports following a school inspection.

    Under the Education (Schools) Act 1992, registered inspectors conducting inspections of schools must report on the quality of education and standards achieved in accordance with Ofsted's published framework for inspection.I have asked Professor Sutherland to write to the hon. Member.

    Public Bodies

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education what his Department's policy is regarding the use of executive search consultants in making appointments to public bodies; and if he will (a) list the appointments where such consultants have been used and (b) list the cost in each case since April 1992.

    The Department occasionally uses the services of executive search consultants as one of the options available to ensure a sufficiently wide field of suitable candidates for appointment to our public bodies. Since April 1992, we have used these services once. On 4 December 1992, we announced that the Department had paid £27,000 to employ Saxton Bampfylde International plc to assist us in searching for candidates suitable for consideration for the chairmanship of the Schools Curriculum and Asessment Authority.

    Funding Councils

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education what criteria are used in the selection of the chair and the executive members of (a) the Further Education Funding Council, (b) the regional committees of the Further Education Funding Council, (c) the Higher Education Funding Council and (d) the Funding Agency for Schools, in respect of relevant experience and qualifications; and if he will make a statement.

    The criteria governing appointments to the Further Education Funding Council are set out in section 1(4) of the Further and Higher Education Act 1992. There are no statutory requirements governing appointments to the regional committees of the Further Education Funding Council. However, the White Paper "Education and Training for the 21st Century", Cm 1536, made it clear that the composition of the regional committees would be similar to that of the council. The criteria governing appointments to the Higher Education Funding Council for England are set out in section 62(4) of the Further and Higher Education Act 1992. The criteria governing appointments to the Funding Agency for Schools are set out in section 3(3) of the Education Act 1993.

    Education Boards

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education what are the minimum and maximum numbers of possible board members of (a) higher education corporations, (b) further education corporations, (c) grant-maintained schools and (d) city technology colleges; what guidelines he has issued concerning the composition of these boards; and what specific guidance has been given on how many board members should be (i) from ethnic minorities, (ii) women, (iii) from the local business sector, (iv) from local authorities and (v) from trade unions.

    (a) The board of governors of higher education corporations must consist of not fewer than 12 and not more than 24 members, plus the principal unless the principal chooses not to be a member. The composition of the board is governed by the provisions of schedule 7A to the Education Reform Act 1988. This requires that up to 13 members shall be independent members appearing to have experience in industrial, commercial or employment matters or the practice of any profession. No specific guidance has been given on particular areas from which membership should be drawn.

    (b) In accordance with their instruments of government, which have been prescribed by regulations, further education corporations must have between 10 and 20 members, of whom at least half must be business members, including a representative of the local training and enterprise council. They may co-opt up to two persons who are employees or members of a local authority. In the case of corporations to conduct sixth-form colleges, the initial members of which were appointed by my right hon. Friend, those responsible for submitting nominations were asked by my right hon. Friend to have regard to the overall balance of the membership in terms of age, gender and ethnic background.

    (c) The minimum number of possible members of a grant-maintained school governing body is 15. Although there is no maximum number, my right hon. Friend expects governing bodies to be of a manageable size. A guide giving details of the composition of governing bodies is available to all grant-maintained schools. It is a statutory requirement that some governors be members of the local business community. There is no requirement that governing bodies include members of ethnic minorities, women, local authorities or trade unionists.

    (d) The model scheme of government for city technology colleges suggests a minimum of nine and a maximum of 20 persons on the board of governors. General guidance on the composition of the governing

    body is included in the model scheme, but there is no specific guidance on how many board members should come from any of the groups named.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education what are the minimum and maximum numbers of possible board members of the (a) Further Education Funding Council, (b) regional committees of the Further Education Funding Council, regional committees of the Further Education Funding Council; (c) action trusts and (d) Funding Agency for Schools; what guidelines he has issued concerning the composition of these boards; and what specific guidance has been given on how many board members should be (i) from ethnic minorities, (ii) women, (iii) from the local business sector, (iv) from local authorities and (v) from trade unions.

    Information relating to the first part of this question is as follows: Following my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister's initiative, goals were set for increasing the representation of ethnic minority groups and women on our public bodies and the Department has made steady progress in this direction. Guidance is available on how these goals may be achieved. Notwithstanding this consideration, appointments to all our public bodies are made solely on the basis of the aptitude, merit and suitability of candidates to undertake the varying requirements associated with individual bodies.

    Maximum number of board membersMinimum number of board members
    Further Education Funding Council1512
    Regional Committees of the Furtherapproximately 12
    Education Funding Councilmembers
    Education Associationsnot less than 5 members
    Funding Agency for Schools1510

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education what are the total numbers of (a) chairpersons and non-executive board members of city technology colleges, (b) chairpersons and members of the governing bodies of grant-maintained schools and (c) chairpersons and members of the governing bodies of further education and sixth form colleges.

    (a) There are currently 14 chairmen of the city technology college governing bodies. Information is not held centrally on the total number of members of governing bodies but each governing body has at least nine members.(b) There are 697 chairmen of operating self governing —grant-maintained—schools' governing bodies. There are a further 108 chairmen designate for schools which are shortly to become self governing. Information is not held centrally of the total number of members of governing bodies but each governing body has at least 15 members.(c) The governing bodies of the 464 further education and sixth form colleges normally have between 10 and 20 members, including a chairman.

    Assisted Places

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much was spent on the assisted places scheme in Devon in each financial year since 1990.

    The information requested is given in the table:

    Financial YearDFE expenditure £000s
    1990–911,903
    1991–922,259
    1992–932,573

    Advertising

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the cost of advertising by his Department has been for each year since 1979 and for each of the last 12 months.

    The expenditure figures for advertising, including press, television and radio, by the Department for the financial years since 1979 are in the table.

    YearAdvertising £k
    1979–8091.6
    1980–818.9
    1981–8286.9
    1982–836.0
    1983–849.6
    1984–8518.5
    1985–8614.8
    1986–87532.0
    1987–88280.0
    1988–89515.0
    1989–90249.8
    1990–912,604.0
    1991–923,037.9
    1992–931,086.4
    It would involve disproportionate costs to break down into individual months the advertising campaigns run by the Department from January to December 1993. Advertising costs are not billed when the adverts actually appear. Details of the campaigns run in the calendar year 1993 are as follows:
    CampaignDateCosts £k
    GM schoolsFebruary to March200.0
    Testing in schoolsApril to May449.0
    Further and high education chartersSeptember to October486.0
    Total1,135.0

    Press Releases

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many press releases his Department has issued in each year since 1979.

    The number of press notices issued by the Department in each year since 1979 are as follows:

    Number
    1979124
    1980209
    1981201
    1982311
    Number
    1983434
    1984218
    1985333
    1986348
    1987392
    1988418
    1989408
    1990406
    1991444
    1992425
    19931423
    1 To 14 December.

    Henry Viii Clauses

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many Henry VIII clauses have been contained in legislation from the Department of Education since 1979; and if he will list the relevant clause and Act in each case.

    The following provisions in Education Acts enacted since 1979 empower the Secretary of State to amend the Act in which they are contained:

    Section
    Education (No. 2) Act 1986:Section 30(5) and paragraph 5 of Schedule 3;
    Education Reform Act 1988:sections 3(4)(a), 41, 43(2)(a), 52(7)(a), 76(14) and 146(1) and paragraph 4 of Schedule 9; and
    Education Act 1993:section 41(10) and para-graph 1(4) of Schedule 3.

    Administration

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education what was the total expenditure by his Department on administration in 1992–93; what is the estimated outturn for expenditure by his Department on administration for 1993–94 in (i) cash terms and (ii) real terms in, 1992–93 prices; and what is his estimate for expenditure on administration by his Department for 1994–95 in (a) cash terms and (b) 1992–93 prices.

    The information requested is as follows:

  • i. The final outturn for the net recurrent costs of running the department in 1992–93 is £103.275 million.
  • ii. The estimated outturn for 1993–94 is £89.575 million.
  • iii. The Department's planned running costs expenditure for 1994–95 is £89 million.
  • The GDP deflators required to calculate real terms figures are shown on page 121 of the "Financial Statement and Budget Report 1994–95", HC 31, copies of which are available in the Library.It should be noted that the 1992–93 figures includes recurrent expenditure of £15.347 million by the office of Her Majesty's chief inspector of schools.

    Secretary Of State's Powers

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many powers were conferred upon the holder of his post by (a) the Education Reform Act 1988, (b) the Further and Higher Education Act 1992 and (c) the Education Act 1993; and if he will make a statement.

    These Acts confer on the Secretary of State a number of powers. Examples are powers to give directions—for example, the power under section 34(1) of the 1988 Act by order to direct the date by which a scheme of local management is to be submitted—and powers of approval—for example, of proposal for the establishment of a new grant-maintained school under section 51 of the 1993 Act. The legislation also contains many examples of powers to prescribe forms or information to be contained in notices, or periods in which duties are to be performed. To identify all the powers in the legislation referred to in the question could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

    Student Income Survey

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education when the results of the recent survey of student income and expenditure conducted by Research Services Ltd. will be published; and if he will make a statement.

    Research Services Ltd. will be publishing the survey report today. I am placing copies in the Library.The survey is an important contribution to the information available about students' financial circumstances since the introduction of student loans. Other recent surveys in this area have been based on small, unrepresentative samples and often less than rigorous questionnaires. The survey reported on today is the most extensive of its sort since the last one in the series in academic year 1988–89.It confirms, as expected, that public support for students under 26 who have taken out Government-subsidised loans has increased since the last survey was conducted in 1988–89. Their income from grant, loan, access funds and benefits rose by about a third in real terms as compared with grant and benefits in 1988–89.At the same time, the report records the reduced financial burden on parents, whose contribution to younger students' income has on average fallen by about a fifth in real terms since 1988–89. On average, parents have continued to pay in full the contribution expected of them, with most paying more and only about a third paying less.The Government particularly welcome the survey's finding that a higher proportion of students from lower social groups are entering higher education. The fears of those who said that the introduction of loans would deter these groups have not been realised.A system of loans for maintenance rates is based on the recognition that everyone's spending needs are different. The accelerated switch from grant to loan which my right hon. Friend announced on 30 November will enhance still further the flexibility of our system of student support.

    School Minibuses (Safety Belts)

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether he proposes to make compulsory the fitting of safety belts to all seated positions in minibuses owned or used by schools.

    I have been asked to reply.We are currently carrying out a review of the full technical and cost implications of seat belts in these vehicles.

    Home Department

    Police, Wales

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the resources available to the police forces in Wales to enable them to maintain an appropriate level of policing over the Christmas period.

    It is for the chief officer of each force to assess his operational requirements at any time, and to provide the appropriate level of policing.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what representations he has received regarding the possibility of potential inadequacy of police resources in Wales over the Christmas period.

    We have received one representation. This relates to police staffing levels in the south Wales police area over the Christmas bank holiday period.

    Safer Cities Initiative

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when he proposes to annnounce which local authorities will receive resources under the safer cities initiative; and if he will make a statement.

    My right hon. and learned Friend expects to make an announcement shortly.

    Racism And Immigrants

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) if he will list the specific actions his Department has taken to combat racism in (a) Tower Hamlets and (b) the United Kingdom;(2) what action his Department has taken to encourage a positive public perception of immigrants.

    Entry Refusals

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many appeals against refusal of entry to visitors were made in the last year in which appeals were accepted; and how many were successful.

    The available information on the outcome of appeals against exclusion and against refusal of entry clearance for temporary purposes is given in Table 8.1 of Home Office Command Paper "Control of Immigration: Statistics United Kingdom 1992", Cm 2368, a copy of which is in the Library.

    Immigration Complaints Audit Committee

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many of the three members he has appointed to the new immigration and nationality department complaints audit committee are members of the Conservative party.

    The members of the IND complaints audit committee were appointed on the basis of the experience and expertise they would bring to the task. Party political affiliation, or the absence of it, played no part in their selection.As a matter of public record, one of the members is a Conservative member of a borough council. I have no knowledge of the political affiliations, if any, of the other two members.

    Drug Misuse

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what progress has been made in bringing forward proposals to ensure that the action to prevent drug misuse is co-ordinated effectively; and if he will make a statement.

    The fight against drugs is one of the Government's priorities. We remain committed to tackling every aspect of the drugs problem and are actively addressing issues across a range of policy areas which are the responsibility of a number of Government Departments. We need, however, to review our strategy to ensure that the policies we are pursuing are correctly identified and are co-ordinated effectively.The Secretary of State for Health and I have therefore decided—with the support of our colleagues—to set up a new central drugs co-ordination unit. The unit will have two major tasks. First, it will ensure that departmental policies are planned, developed and implemented in England within a clear strategic framework. Second, the unit will take the lead in devising an effective basis for local co-ordination of action to tackle the drugs problem, which will add significantly to the value of much excellent work already being carried out locally in the public, private and voluntary sectors. The unit's immediate task is to review the strategy on drugs published in 1989 and make recommendations for its improvement.The unit will be attached to the Privy Council Office, reporting to the Lord President of the Council, who chairs the Cabinet committee on drugs issues. Individual Government Departments will remain responsible for their policies which impact on the drugs problem and will work closely with the unit.In Scotland, the arrangements for co-ordination are among the issues being addressed by the drugs task force led by my noble and learned Friend the Minister of State, Scottish Office. The Secretary of State for Wales will shortly announce the arrangements which will apply in Wales.

    Film Violence

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will consider introducing further restrictions on the depiction of violence in films and videos.

    We already have a well-established and rigorous system of video classification exercised by the British Board of Film Classification under the Video Recordings Act 1984 and 1993. In practice the BBFC exercises a similar role in relation to cinema films, although the legal responsibility under the Cinemas Act 1985 lies with local authorities.The BBFC's approach to the classification of films and videos is discussed in its annual report for 1992, a copy of which is available in the Library. This makes it clear that the BBFC takes its responsibilities very seriously, and that it is particularly concerned about the depiction of violence. The BBFC is required to have special regard to the fact that videos will be viewed in the home; consequently films are more restrictively classified on video than for the cinema, and some cinema films may not be regarded as suitable for release on video in any version. The BBFC, with others, has commissioned research into the viewing habits of young offenders in order to inform its future classification policy, and I understand that the results of this research are expected to be published early next year.The Government are not complacent about this issue, and we keep the present controls under regular review. Nevertheless, as I explained in my reply to the hon. Member on 7 December,

    Official Report, column 163, the law can go only so far and the final responsibility for what is seen must inevitably rest in the home.

    Charities

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many charities are currently registered in the united Kingdom; and how many of them hold funds in excess of £5 million.

    At the end of November 1993, there were 169,829 charities on the register kept by the Charity Commissioners for England and Wales.No reliable figure exists for the number of charities which hold funds or other assets worth £5 million or more. There are, however, at least 345 registered charities in England and Wales with an annual income of £5 million or more in their last financial year.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what consideration he has given to altering the guidelines to ensure that charities dispose of their funds in excess of maintaining reasonable resources.

    This is a matter for the Charity Commissioners. I understand that the commissioners are concerned about the high level of accumulations of income of some charities and are currently considering the key policy issues that arise from this. The commissioners will complete their examination of the matter in the new year and are planning to issue formal guidance to charities shortly after that.

    Departmental Offices (Heating Bills)

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list, by location, the annual fuel heating bills for each of his Department's offices for the last four years, and for this year to date.

    Operation Cheetah

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many man hours have been used in Operation Cheetah at the latest date.

    Merseyside police estimate that, since April 1990, approximately 22,000 man days have been devoted to Operation Cheetah.

    Combat 18

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he will consider launching an investigation into the activities of the group Combat 18.

    If anyone has information that an individual or group is engaged in any kind of criminal activity he or she should pass it to the police. It is part of the normal responsibility of the police to keep an eye on all organisations that might pose a threat to public order.

    Prisoners (Compensation Payments)

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many prisoners or ex-prisoners instituted legal action in relation to their imprisonment against the Home Office in 1992; and how many of these cases were settled out of court or were found against the Home Office;(2) on how many occasions prisoners or ex-prisoners were paid compensation or ex-gratia payment for other than losses of personal property in 1992; and what is the total of that compensation.

    Responsibility for these matters has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for replies to be given.

    Letter from Derek Lewis to Mr. Peter Luff, dated 16 December 1993:

    The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent questions about litigation and compensation payments to prisoners and ex-prisoners.
    I have assumed for the purpose of this reply that your questions relate to litigation and compensation payments connected to time spent in prison custody, rather than wrongful conviction, which of course falls outside my sphere of responsibility.
    Prison Service records show 130 pieces of legal action against the department lodged by prisoners or ex-prisoners in 1992. Of these 13 have been settled out of court or found against the Home Office; two have been withdrawn or struck out and the remaining 115 appear as outstanding (although there may be some delay in the recording of resolved cases). The compensation (including ex-gratia payments) paid to prisoners and ex-prisoners in 1992, other than for loss of property, was as follows:

    Injuries at work£265,813
    Excessive detention£22,718
    Other claims1£123,114
    Total£411,645

    1 Including personal injury outside work.

    Figures for the number of individual claims are not recorded and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

    Wymott Prison

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what educational facilities are available to prisoners currently housed at Wymott prison;(2) what work facilities are available to prisoners currently housed at Wymott prison;(3) what training facilities are available to prisoners currently housed at Wymott prison;(4) what exercise facilities outside the cell block area are available to prisoners currently housed at Wymott prison;

    (5) what progress is being made in the refurbishment of Wymott prison following the recent riots; what hours and days of the week are the contractors on site; and what proportion of the building is now habitable.

    Responsibility for these matters has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

    Letter from Derek Lewis to Ms Joan Ruddock, dated December 1993:

    The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent questions about prisoners facilities and the progress of refurbishment at Wymott Prison.
    There are facilities for forty full-time education places during the week within the education department, with a further forty prisoners participating in part-time evening education within the Houseblock.
    A range of work is available now and includes tailoring, weaving, engineering and laundry. There are enough places for the number of prisoners held at Wymott. Further work places will be available in the New Year as the population rises.
    In addition to the training provided through education and work, a number of accredited NVQ and formal Vocational Training Courses (VTCs) will be introduced over coming months.
    The important work with prisoners to help them address offending behavour will commence in the New Year. This will include delivery of the core sex offender programme, for which staff are being trained as we promised when it was decided to move sex offenders from Risley to Wymott.
    There are ample outdoor areas for fresh-air exercise, together with a fully equipped gymnasium.
    Of the four house blocks, 'B' House is already fully occupied while refurbishment of 'A' House is on line for completion by 23 December and ready for occupation in mid-January 1994. The two remaining house blocks are to be demolished and re-built with stronger, cellular accommodation which will not be available for occupancy for about two years. Contractors are working on site for eleven hours a day, seven days a week.

    Police officers assaulted on duty 1992

    Officers assaulted

    Fatal assaults

    Serious assaults

    Minor assaults

    Other assaults

    Forces

    Aged 18 to 20

    Aged 21 to 25

    Aged 26 to 30

    Aged over 30

    Avon and Somerset111013024403445026
    Bedfordshire03755600543125
    Cambridge02839490411910
    Cheshire7207222279023179513
    City of London15600084
    Cleveland235539301410784
    Cumbria5223370091296
    Derbyshire05810315602121383
    Devon and Cornwall14896166016108246
    Dorset21732870261102
    Durham243771050735185
    Dyfed-Powys3112339011781
    Essex1166508201011089
    Gloucestershire22837780171262
    Greater Manchester0167431411083458468
    Gwent5728812401014265
    Hampshire25411321901094284
    Hertfordshire43646470335100
    Humberside1130421440796130
    Kent452678401347147
    Lancashire0105130201014118334
    Leicestershire32346780845111
    Lincolnshire0122074065157
    Merseyside3134419463059218762
    Norfolk1139541190774177

    Sheehy Inquiry

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) if he will publish the information provided to the Sheehy inquiry on the number of policemen injured on duty;(2) if he will publish the information provided to the Sheehy inquiry on the probability of death in service for police officers and the life expectations of those retiring at age 50 and 60 years.

    Information on these subjects was provided to the inquiry from a number of different sources. That provided by Her Majesty's inspectorate of constabulary for England and Wales on the number of police officers assaulted on duty and by the Government Actuary's Department relating to the assumed probability of death in service for police officers and assumed life expectancy of those retiring is shown in the tables:

    Specimen rates given to the Sheehy inquiry for the assumed probability of deaths in service at the ages specified Serving officers
    Age nearestMalesFemales
    200.00070.0002
    250.00060.0003
    300.00040.0003
    350.00050.0004
    400.00080.0006
    450.00130.0009
    500.230.0013
    550.380.0021
    Retired officers: assumed expectation of life on normal retirement
    Years
    Normal retirement ageMalesFemales
    5028.3
    6019.8

    Officers assaulted

    Fatal assaults

    Serious assaults

    Minor assaults

    Other assaults

    Forces

    Aged 18 to 20

    Aged 21 to 25

    Aged 26 to 30

    Aged over 30

    North Wales019338908124142
    North Yorkshire3303869061340
    Northamptonshire23132710121240
    Northumbria0751392180684306
    Nottinghamshire485107170013268126
    South Wales311817229004166147
    South Yorkshire14370830208394
    Staffordshire201401101310835835
    Suffolk0243969069074
    Surrey27372920122261
    Sussex8568116501831133
    Thames Valley28910817501399262
    Warwickshire2343459086457
    West Mercia13366141010126168
    West Midlands233625147460110680855
    West Yorkshire7151210371058373346
    Wiltshire8575673089888
    Provincial Total1562,8594,2936,49508367,3146,545
    Metropolitan Police292891309801401,0032,270
    England and Wales Total1853,1484,4236,59309768,3178,815

    Prisoners (Release)

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make it obligatory for the prison authorities to give prior notification to the police and to the victims of the crime of the release of a prisoner convicted of assault.

    Under the early release arrangements introduced by the Criminal Justice Act 1991, the Prison Service already provides the police with prior notice of the release dates of all offenders, irrespective of the offence committed. I do not believe that it would be practicable to require the Prison Service to inform the victim or the victim's family in every instance that an offender, or particular class of offender, is due to be released. However, the Probation Service national standards for the supervision of offenders in the community which came into effect at the same time as the early release arrangements, require that in particularly sensitive cases the probation officer should, when completing a pre-discharge or parole assessment report, address the whereabouts, attitude towards release and concerns of the victim or the victim's family.

    Central European Time

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when he now intends to bring forward his proposals for the adoption of central European time; and if he will make a statement.

    I refer the hon. Member to the reply I gave to a question from my hon. Friend the hon. Member for Bournemouth, East (Mr. Atkinson) on 4 November 1933, Official Report, column 363.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what consideration his Department has given to the likely effect on rates of crime against the person of a move to central European time.

    The 1989 Green Paper "Summer Time—A Consultation Document", CM22, considered that definite conclusions about the possible effect of a move to central European time on crime in general, or on particular offences, are difficult to draw.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate his Department has made of the cost to the public exchequer of a move to central European time.

    I would refer the hon. Member to the reply I gave to a question by my hon. Friend the Member for Bolton, North-East (Mr. Thurnham) on 15 January 1993, at column 828.

    Summer Time

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what has been his Department's response to the proposed seventh directive on summer time arrangements in the European Community.

    The Government have made clear in negotiations on the draft seventh directive that its terms are acceptable, while proposing that, on subsidiarity grounds, summer time start and end dates would better be the subject of a recommendation than of Community legislation.

    Public Bodies

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department which of the appointments made to public bodies by his Department since April 1992 have been advertised.

    Since April 1992, the appointments of chief executive of the Commission for Racial Equality and the Data Protection Registrar have been advertised.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what his Department's policy is regarding the use of executive search consultants in making appointments to public bodies; and if he will (a) list the appointments where such consultants have been used and (b) list the cost in each case since April 1992.

    Executive search consultants are used in making appointments to public bodies where it is thought that they will be able to supplement usefully the field of applicants.Since April 1992, consultants have been used for the post of chief executive of the Commission for Racial Equality and in the current competition for the post of Data Protection Registrar.For reasons of commercial confidentiality it is not our practice to disclose individual contract values. However, the combined value of the two contracts was £32,500.

    "Voluntary Action"

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is his policy towards the proposals in the report, "Voluntary Action".

    "Voluntary Action" was written by Barry Knight of the Centre for Research and Innovation in Social Policy and Practice: the views in the report are those of the author. The Government consider the report to be a

    SeptemberOctoberNovember
    EstablishmentSuper-numerary postsEstablishmentSuper-numerary postsEstablishmentSuper-numerary posts
    Avon and Somerset3,08733,08733,0873
    Bedfordshire1,17801,17801,1780
    Cambridgeshire1,241381,241381,24138
    Cheshire1,92021,92021,9202
    City of London79890798105798105
    Cleveland1,50201,50201,5020
    Cumbria1,18711,18711,1871
    Derbyshire1,85001,85001,8500
    Devon and Cornwall2,92842,92842,9284
    Dorset1,30211,30211,3021
    Durham1,38911,38911,3891
    Dyfed Powys969196919691
    Essex2,95002,95002,9500
    Gloucestershire1,18401,18401,1840
    Greater Manchester7,07707,07707,0770
    Gwent1,01021,01021,0102
    Hampshire3,26903,26903,2690
    Hertfordshire1,68401,68401,6840
    Humberside2,03402,03402,0340
    Kent3,136373,136373,13637
    Lancashire3,22933,22933,2293
    Leicestershire1,85311,85311,8531
    Lincolnshire1,20601,20601,2060
    Merseyside4,70634,70634,7063
    Metropolitan Police27,839027,839027,8390
    Norfolk1,44611,44611,4461
    North Wales1,36921,36921,3692
    North Yorkshire1,41801,41801,4180
    Northamptonshire1,19011,19011,1901
    Northumbria3,61303,61303,1630
    Nottinghamshire2,344132,344132,34413
    South Wales3,16833,16833,1683
    South Yorkshire3,03103,03103,0310
    Staffordshire2,21512,21512,2151
    Suffolk1,23311,23311,2331
    Surrey1,673171,673171,67317
    Sussex3,01413,01413,0141
    Thames Valley3,812713,812713,81271
    Warwickshire1,020251,020251,02025
    West Mercia2,05322,05322,0532
    West Midlands6,97706,97706,9770
    West Yorkshire5,29525,29525,2952
    Wiltshire1,1811081,1811081,181018
    Total126,580435126,580450126,580450

    worthwhile contribution to the continuing debate on charities and the voluntary sector, but do not accept the report's proposals to end charitable status, tax concessions for charitable giving or to abolish the Charity Commission. The Government also consider that the proposal to split the voluntary sector into "first force" and "third sector" is too simple and mechanistic.

    Police

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what was the police establishment plus supernumeraries for each month of 1993.

    I refer the hon. Member to the reply given to a question from the hon. Member for Cardiff, South and Penarth (Mr. Michael) on 24 November, at columns 55–56. Additional figures for the period September to November are given in the table. I will write to the hon. Member when complete figures for December are available.

    Art Theft

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what proposals he has to enable police forces to improve the detection of art theft; and if he will make a statement.

    The investigation of art theft is entirely a matter for individual chief officers of police. Some police forces have already taken steps to improve the effectiveness of their operations against art theft. The establishment of the artefact classification and indentification system by the Metropolitan police is one example to which I brought the hon. Member's attention on 7 July.I cannot stress too greatly the important role members of the public play in preventing this type of crime by marking and keeping details and photographs of their valuable possessions.

    Press Releases

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many press releases his Department has issued in each year since 1979.

    The number of news releases issued by the Home Office for each full calendar year since 1979 is:

    Number
    1979250
    1980249
    1981237
    1982207
    1983249
    1984327
    1985346
    1986406
    1987384
    1988476
    1989500
    1990475
    1991510
    1992348

    Immigration Advisory Service

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what are (a) the names, (b) the occupations and (c) the salaries of the trustees of the organisation formerly called UKIAS.

    The trustees of the Immigration Appeals Advisory Service are Mr. Humfrey Malins, Chairman, Dr. M. S. Akram, Mr. Alf Dubs, Ms Rachel Pickavance and Dr. Z. U. Khan. I understand that trustees receive no remuneration for their services. The hon. Member may wish to address his request for information about the occupations of trustees direct to the Service, which, as I said in a reply to him on 10 December, Official Report, column 418, is an independent body.

    Prison, Birmingham

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what present proposals he has to build a new prison in Birmingham.

    Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

    Letter from Derek Lewis to Mr. Robin Corbett, dated 16 December 1993:

    The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Question about any proposals the Prison Service has to build a new prison in Birmingham.
    Although the Prison Service is actively seeking sites for new prisons, at present there are no specific plans to build a new prison in Birmingham. Any such sites must be near to the locality from which prisoners come in order to meet our commitments set out in the White Paper "Custody, Care and Justice". At present, there are insufficient prison places available in the West Midlands area to house all the prisoners who come from that area.

    Hunters

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what effect his proposals for an offence of aggravated trespass would have on hunters entering land belonging to people who have not given them permission to do so.

    The proposed new offence will apply to all trespassers, including hunters, who disrupt, or seek to disrupt, a lawful activity on land.

    Administration

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what was the total expenditure by his Department on administration in 1992–93; what is the estimated outturn for expenditure by his Department on administration for 1993–94 in (i) cash terms and (ii) real terms in, 1992–93 prices; and what is his estimate for expenditure on administration by his Department for 1994–95 in (a) cash terms and (b) 1992–93 prices.

    The final outturn for the recurrent costs of running the Department in 1992–93 is £1,421 million. The estimated outturn for 1993–94 is £1,642 million—£1,590 million at 1992–93 prices. These figures include the costs of immigration service staff and of Prison Service grades. The planned running costs expenditure for 1994–95 will be published in the Home Office annual report 1994 and in the unified Budget supplement.

    Metropolitan Police

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make a statement about Mr. Graham Wyn Jones, Assistant Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis.

    Following a review by Mr. Jeremy Gompertz QC of the evidence relating to Mr. Wyn Jones's conduct, the then Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis informed my predecessor in October 1992 that he regarded Mr. Wyn Jones's behaviour as reprehensible and wholly inconsistent with what was expected of someone holding the office of Assistant Commissioner.The Permanent Under-Secretary of State of the Home Department heard representations from Mr. Wyn Jones in January 1993.My predecessor subsequently concluded that Her Majesty the Queen should be advised that Mr. Wyn Jones should no longer be regarded as fit to hold his office. I delayed putting such advice to Her Majesty so that Mr. Wyn Jones should have an opportunity to seek leave to apply for judicial review. This he did, but on 2 December 1993 the Divisional Court refused him leave.

    I accordingly advised Her Majesty the Queen that Mr. Wyn Jones must be regarded as unfit to continue to hold office as an Assistant Commissioner and Her Majesty has now withdrawn his warrant of appointment. Mr. Wyn Jones has been removed from office.

    Court Escort Service

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what progress has been made in selecting a contractor to operate the court escort service in the Metropolitan police district.

    On 16 February, my predecessor announced an intention to invite tenders for the provision of the court escort and custody service for the Metropolitan police district, under the provisions of the Criminal Justice Act 1991.After carefully considering the proposals submitted, the Prisons Board has decided to award the contract to Securicor Custodial Services Ltd. A contract will be signed before the end of the year.The new service will come into operation in five phases starting in July 1994, using staff who are required by statute and under the contract to be properly trained and vetted. It will release prison and police officers to concentrate on duties more appropriate to their particular skills and duties.

    Travel Documents

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what changes there have been in the policy and practice on the issue of Home Office travel documents.

    Officials have written to the United Kingdom representative of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees and to other interested

    Hit and run accidents involving pedestrians: 1989 to 1992
    Year of Accident
    Police Force1989199019911992
    Metropolitan Police1,5781,4401,3581,255
    Cumbria45383832
    Lancashire152166172181
    Merseyside233205220232
    Greater Manchester512425445442
    Cheshire97988680
    Northumbria178187170162
    Durham51756760
    North Yorkshire79715640
    West Yorkshire191231259257
    South Yorkshire153143133139
    Humberside891179189
    Cleveland951029369
    West Midlands364411424380
    Staffordshire931088789
    West Mercia82799162
    Warwickshire35283336
    Derbyshire85898485
    Nottinghamshire154138123113
    Lincolnshire33412840
    Leicestershire85688589
    Northamptonshire46403446
    Cambridgeshire56474559
    Norfolk74666349
    Suffolk43442826
    Bedfordshire53492741
    Hertfordshire68754958
    Essex121112108115
    Thames Valley180144114119
    Hampshire137143138144

    organisations setting out changes which are to be introduced on 1 January 1994. The new arrangements clarify our policy and practice in the issue of Home Office travel documents and the charges we make for them. I have placed a copy of the letter in the Library.

    Parish Constables

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what progress is being made on the parish constable initiative; and if he will make a statement.

    Commitments have been received from police forces and communities to 38 schemes. Twenty of these schemes will be evaluated by the Home Office.I am greatly encouraged by the response to this initiative, which has been very positive. Communities and police forces all over the country are engaged in a constructive process of consultation. I expect to be in a position to give an account of progress on a force by force basis early in the spring.

    Hit And Run Accidents

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list by police authority for the last four years, and for this year to date, the number of hit and run vehicle accidents involving pedestrians that have been reported; how many of the accidents were caused by stolen vehicles; and how many resulted in the death of the pedestrian.

    I have been asked to reply.The number of hit and run accidents involving pedestrians and the number of hit and run accidents involving pedestrian fatalities for the last four years for each police authority are given in the tables. Data for 1993 are not yet available. Information on stolen vehicles involved in injury accidents is not available.

    Year of Accident

    Police Force

    1989

    1990

    1991

    1992

    Surrey73837056
    Kent132153152120
    Sussex120135126113
    Devon and Cornwall130120129134
    Avon and Somerset129759982
    Gloucestershire44314141
    Wiltshire37434439
    Dorset56604246
    North Wales52746559
    Gwent26144529
    South Wales234209185171
    Dyfed-Powys26294835
    Northern8779
    Grampian44355653
    Tayside23232017
    Fife20141417
    Lothian and Borders10010486112
    Central12191717
    Strathclyde195240220210
    Dumfries and Galloway101285
    TOTAL6,6336,4606,2235,954

    Hit and run accidents involving pedestrian fatalities: 1989 to 1992

    Year of accident

    Police force

    1989

    1990

    1991

    1992

    Metropolitan Police14141619
    Cumbria1210
    Lancashire0223
    Merseyside4682
    Greater Manchester716158
    Cheshire3100
    Northumbria2566
    Durham3330
    North Yorkshire2100
    West Yorkshire3543
    South Yorkshire2445
    Humberside0001
    Cleveland0210
    West Midlands6686
    Staffordshire1000
    West Mercia0020
    Warwickshire2000
    Derbyshire0122
    Nottinghamshire1221
    Lincolnshire0000
    Leicestershire1110
    Northamptonshire3000
    Cambridgeshire1100
    Norfolk2201
    Suffolk0100
    Bedfordshire0120
    Hertfordshire1113
    Essex2310
    Thames Valley4211
    Hampshire2503
    Surrey0200
    Kent4432
    Sussex3210
    Devon and Cornwall1022
    Avon and Somerset2354
    Gloucestershire1011
    Wiltshire0010
    Dorset0111
    North Wales2001
    Gwent0010
    South Wales2136
    Dyfed-Powys0011
    Northern0010
    Grampian1001
    Tayside0100
    Fife0000
    Lothian and Borders2411

    Year of accident

    Police force

    1989

    1990

    1991

    1992

    Central0100
    Strathclyde3346
    Dumfries and Galloway0000
    Total8810910590

    Overseas Development

    United Nations Department Of Humanitarian Affairs

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what is the employment status of the Under-Secretary General of the department of humanitarian affairs at the United Nations.

    The Under-Secretary General of the United Nations department of humanitarian affairs is appointed by the United Nations Secretary-General on a fixed term contract for one year, which may be renewed by mutual agreement.

    United Nations Emergency Intervention

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (1) what policy proposals he has to improve the co-ordination of United Nations activities in emergency intervention situations;(2) what proposals he has for changing the role of the department of humanitarian affairs at the United Nations;(3) what assessment he has made of the performance of the department of humanitarian affairs at the United Nations.

    The views of Her Majesty's Government on the improvement of the co-ordination of United Nations emergency relief and the performance to date and future role of the United Nations department of humanitarian affairs are set out in the address of my noble Friend the Minister for Overseas Development to the United Nations General Assembly of 19 November 1993, a copy of which has been placed in both the Libraries of the House.

    Aid

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how British aid is helping poverty reduction in developing countries.

    The British aid programme, in collaboration with the World Bank and other donors, is supporting economic reform programmes in developing countries, which will set the policy framework for sustainable growth and create jobs. At the same time the Overseas Development Administration is assisting recipient governments to define and carry out their own poverty reduction strategies, to ensure that the poor benefit from economic growth. We are also providing direct assistance to the poor in developing countries, to enhance their livelihood security, increase their incomes, and improve their access to basic social services.

    Non-Governmental Organisations

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will list payments made to each non-governmental organisation under the joint funding scheme in the last financial year for which figures are available.

    Details of all ODA grants made to United Kingdom non-governmental organisations under the joint funding scheme, for the financial year 1992–93, are set out in the table.

    ODA joint funding scheme grants to NGOs 1992–93
    Amount of grant awarded in financial year 1992–93
    £
    ACORD625,066
    ActionAid992,749
    Action Health 200027,541
    ADD166,621
    ADRA9,213
    Africa Now69,283
    Africa Resource Trust66,118
    Aga Khan Foundation459,302
    AHRTAG280,846
    Alternative for India Development65,351
    AMREF194,642
    APT Design and Development153,031
    APTT Trust-United Kingdom4,163
    British Nepal Medical Trust27,260
    British Red Cross Society53,550
    Busoga Trust50,000
    CAFOD1,321,000
    Cambodia Trust160,000
    CARE Britain1,339,687
    Catholic Institute for International Relations193,825
    Childhope34,750
    Christian Aid2,231,000
    Christian Outreach44,771
    Christians Abroad5,112
    CODA International Training (CIT)58,022
    Commonwealth Human Ecology Council13,601
    Commonwealth Trade Union Council167,567
    Concern997,569
    Conservation Foundation74,244
    Cooperation For Development394,325
    Cusichaca Project Trust33,551
    Duke of Edinburgh Award39,523
    Durham-Lesotho Link40,692
    Feed The Minds14,638
    Find Your Feet10,370
    Food For The Hungry7,820
    Friends of Conservation63,179
    Friends of Urambo and Mwanhala8,791
    Gaia Foundation1,306
    £
    Gordon Barclay Vietnam Fund5,481
    Halo Trust188,900
    Harvest Help34,423
    Health Aid Moyo84,180
    Health Unlimited426,935
    Hedley Roberts Trust13,477
    Help The Aged199,014
    Henry Doubleday Research Association17,521
    Homeless International90,280
    ICBP76,940
    Impact Foundation8,818
    India Development Group39,375
    Institute of Development Studies140
    International Committee for Andean Aid21,769
    Intercare43,178
    Intermediate Technology Development495,856
    International Agricultural Training27,240
    International Children's Trust1,717
    International Christian Relief102,349
    Lasallian Projects6,993
    Leonard Cheshire Foundation4,350
    Leprosy Mission12,575
    Living Earth178,100
    Medical Aid for Palestinians46,530
    Money for Madagascar20,649
    MSI993,902
    National Children's Home66,767
    New Age Access9,800
    Ockenden Venture36,665
    One World Action11,289
    OXFAM4,207,651
    Panos Institute13,550
    Plan International622,309
    Population Concern304,815
    Project Mala69,317
    Richmond Fellowship International33,566
    Rio Maza21,179
    Royal Commonwealth Society231,006
    Ryder-Cheshire Foundation11,441
    SALTLIC13,247
    Save The Children Fund3,531,000
    SCIAF131,898
    Scripture Union36,089
    Send A Cow39,417
    Skillshare Africa150,132
    SOS Sahel206,930
    South African Townships Health Fund80,000
    SPICMA24,179
    St. John Ambulance9,738
    Tanzania Development Trust191
    Tear Fund75,800
    Toch-H11,024
    Traidcraft Exchange130,739
    TRAX Programme Support9,603
    Tropical Health and Education Trust15,446
    TUIREG14,709
    Uganda Society for Disabled Children173,909
    United Kingdom Jewish Aid95,000
    UKFSP125,297
    University of Warwick21,700
    Urban Aid62,477
    VetAid47,815
    Village Service Trust8,501
    Vision Aid Overseas26,149
    VSO65,000
    Water Aid772,325
    Womankind120,717
    World University Service176,642
    World Vision304,450
    Worldwide Fund for Nature1,510,000
    Youth With A Mission48,411
    Y-Care International52,856
    Zimbabwe Trust552,080
    Zoological Society of London40,000
    TOTAL27,963,597

    House Of Commons

    Private Contractors

    To ask the Chairman of the Finance and Services Committee if he will list the work within the House that is now undertaken by private contractors.

    Private contractors are used extensively in the provision of services to the House. The Parliamentary Works Directorate makes use of contractors and consultants for works projects funded by subheads Al, A2, and A3 of the vote for works services; and Departments of the House commission consultants and contractors to provide administrative or technical support in such fields as recruitment, training, catering and information technology. Details are a matter for the respective heads of Department.

    National Audit Office

    To ask the Chairman of the Public Accounts Commission how many reports have been prepared by Clark Whitehill into the value for money achieved by the National Audit Office; what recommendations it has made for improvements; which of its reports he will make publicly available; if he will give his reasons in respect of those he will not place in the public domain; and if he will make a statement.

    The Public Accounts Commission appointed Clark Whitehill as external auditors of the National Audit Office on 1 April 1990 for a period of up to five years. At the request of the Commission they have so far produced two value for money reports on the National Audit Office.In November 1991, Clark Whitehill reported on the National Audit Office's environmental policy, monitoring and reporting. They recommended that the NAO adopt an environmental policy statement, set environmental targets and objectives, and improve monitoring of environmental legislation and European Community activities. The Comptroller and Auditor General took prompt action in response to all recommendations.In 1993 Clark Whitehill reviewed the National Audit Office's certification audit methods. They reported to the Commission in June 1993, and concluded that NAO methods are comparable to best practice in the auditing profession and result in efficient audits of an acceptable quality. Again, the Comptroller and Auditor General has taken action to implement the recommendations, and he reported details of progress to the Commission earlier this month. He will be reporting again in 1994.I have arranged for copies of both reports to be placed in the Library.

    Public Accounts Commission

    To ask the Chairman of the Public Accounts Commission (1) what plans he has to centralise the functions of the Audit Office by relocating the employment and training division from Sheffield to London;(2) what estimate he has made for the cost of relocating the employment and training division of the Audit Office from Sheffield to London; and what estimates have been made of the travelling expenses that would arise from such a relocation.