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Radiation Detectors

Volume 353: debated on Tuesday 4 July 2000

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To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if the IPM-7 type radiation detectors at Faslane base meet the standard required for the function they are put to; what standard his Department requires of BRDL at Rosyth; and what differences there are between the operations at Rosyth and Faslane. [128027]

The IPM-7 type radiation detectors are calibrated at least once a year in accordance with legislative requirements. The monitoring arrangements used at Rosyth are legally the responsibility of the Chief Executive of the dockyard company and are not under the control of the MOD.

It is not possible to make comparisons between Faslane and Rosyth as all nuclear safety matters relating to Rosyth Royal Dockyard are a matter for Babcock Rosyth Defence Ltd., the owners of the dockyard. It is a condition of their contract with the MOD that they must comply with all nuclear safety regulations.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how often the Electra ratemeter and BP7 probes are given a functional response check; and how often they are calibrated at each site where they are in use. [128032]

At Her Majesty's Naval Bases Devonport and Clyde, the Electra ratemeter and BP7 probes undergo various daily function checks and are calibrated at least once a year in accordance with legislative requirements.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what differences exist in the checks for radioactive contamination between personnel working (a) on reactor compartments and (b) in an active processing facility and nuclear repair workshops. [128033]

All service and civilian staff working in reactor compartments at Her Majesty's Naval Base Faslane are checked fully for contamination on completion of their work using an Electra ratemeter with BP7 probe. This supplements routine contamination monitoring of work areas. Additionally, those working in the Active Processing Facility and Nuclear Repair Workshop are monitored using IPM-7 type portal radiation detectors.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence when the Mk10 probe came into service; how many are in use and at what locations; and what plans he has to replace them. [128028]

The Mk10 ratemeter came into service in 1976. There are approximately 65 Mk10 ratemeters currently available for use at the naval bases and on board submarines. The Mk10 ratemeters are programmed for replacement in the financial year 2002–03.