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School Curriculum

Volume 404: debated on Wednesday 30 April 2003

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To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many hours pupils spent on average per week studying (a) English, (b) mathematics, (c) physical education, (d) music and (e) history broken down by school year group, in each year since 1997. [110051]

The amount of time spent on each National Curriculum subject is for individual schools to decide. Schools are required to cover the programme of study for each subject during the relevant key stage but are free to organise their timetable as they wish. The Department does not collect comparative data which relates to the average amount of time spent per week on a particular subject.

In order to help schools plan their own timetable the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) has produced non-statutory guidance suggesting how much time should be spent on each National Curriculum subject per week at key stages 1, 2 and 3.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what figures he has collated on the percentage of children who learn about poverty in developing nations at school. [109677]

The Department does not collect data centrally on the percentage of children who learn about poverty in developing nations at school. Through Citizenship, a statutory requirement in secondary schools from September 2002, pupils study global issues, including the political, social and economic implications. Through geography, a statutory requirement for 5 to 14-year-olds, pupils learn about different countries, their peoples and culture, including the concept of interdependence.