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Prison Service

Volume 405: debated on Monday 19 May 2003

The text on this page has been created from Hansard archive content, it may contain typographical errors.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to his answer of 11 April 2003, Official Report, column 449W, on prisons, what the length of detention was of (a) convicted and (b) convicted unsentenced prisoners on 28 February 2003; and what the figures were for 30 June 2002. [112129]

The length of time since first remand into a Prison Service establishment of untried and convicted unsentenced prisoners is given in the table.

30 June 200228 February 2003
Untried
Less than 1 week1,010760
1 week0120
More than 1 week up to and including 1 month1,8902,100
More than 1 month up to and including 3 months2,8402,420
More than 3 months up to and including 6 months1,3801,480
More than 6 months up to and including 12 months500530
More than 12 months250300
All lengths7,8807,720
Convicted unsentenced
Less than 1 week620520
1 week0110
More than 1 week up to and including 1 month1,5201,600
More than 1 month up to and including 3 months1,4801,230
More than 3 months up to and including 6 months9601,030
More than 6 months up to and including 12 months420500
More than 12 months190260
All lengths5,2005,250

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department which prisons in England he plans to market test; and if he will make a statement. [112152]

There are no current plans to market test prisons in England or Wales. The Prison Service has, however, set up a programme of performance testing under which under-performing public sector prisons are required to deliver improvements. Failure to deliver improvements may ultimately lead to the prisons being contracted out to the private sector in a competition without a Prison Service in-house bid. Two prisons have been awarded service level agreements (Reading and Leicester) and two are being performance tested at present (Dartmoor and Liverpool); two more will be performance tested later in 2003 and a further six in 2004.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) pursuant to his answer of 1 May 2003, Official Report, column 527W, on prisons, how many prisoners at each of the prisons listed were engaged in average or above average levels of purposeful activity; [113428](2) pursuant to his answer of 1 May 2003,

Official Report, column 527W, if he will provide a breakdown of activities in which prisoners were engaged at each of the prisons listed in 2001–02. [113427]

A breakdown of the activities in which prisoners were engaged at Her Majesty's Prison Altcourse, Her Majesty's Prison Rye Hill and Her Majesty's Prison Wolds in 2001–02 is shown in the following table.

ActivityAltcourseRye HillWolds
Accredited offending behaviour programmeYesYesYes
Non-accredited offending behaviour programmeYesYesNo
Basics and key skills educationYesYesYes
Education (full time and part time)YesYesYes
Other educationYesYesYes
CateringYesYesYes
ChaplaincyYesYesYes
Cleaning and maintenanceYesYesYes
CounsellingYesNoNo
Work on drugsYesYesYes
Family social visitsYesYesYes
GardeningYesYesYes
InductionYesYesYes
IndustriesYesYesYes
LaundryYesYesYes
LibraryYesYesYes
ActivityAltcourseRye HillWolds
Media centreNoYesYes
Orderly workYesYesYes
Physical educationYesYesYes
Prison maintenanceYesYesYes
ResettlementYesNoYes
Sentence managementYesYesYes
The level of activity of each prisoner is not routinely collated and the calculation of whether the levels are above, at or below average can be made only at disproportionate cost.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the average length of stay per prisoner was at (a) HMP Altcourse, (b) HMP Rye Hill and (c) HMP Wolds in 2001–02. [113429]

The information needed to answer the question is not recorded in the format asked and can be retrieved only in that format at disproportionate cost.