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Education Standards

Volume 405: debated on Monday 19 May 2003

The text on this page has been created from Hansard archive content, it may contain typographical errors.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what percentage of students achieved the expected standard for their age in the Key Stage Two literacy tests between 1998 and 2002. [113075]

The table as follows shows the percentage of pupils who achieved level 4 or above in the Key Stage 2 English test, and the reading and writing components, in England between 1998 and 2002.

Age199719981999200020012002
11 years13NC test papers13NC test papers13NC test papers13NC test papers13NC test papers13NC test papers
14 years7 NC test papers20 NC test papers20 NC test papers20 NC test papers20 NC test papers20 NC test papers
16 years7 NC test papers and 8.2 GCSEs7 NC test papers and 8.2 GCSEs7 NC test papers and 8.2 GCSEs20 NC test papers and 8.2 GCSEs20 NC test papers and 8.2 GCSEs20 NC test papers and 8.7 GCSEs
18 years7 NC test papers and 11.3 GCSEs and GCE A/AS and GNVQs7 NC test papers and 11.3 GCSEs and GCE A/AS and GNVQs7 NC test papers and 11.3 GCSEs and GCE A/AS and GNVQs7 NC test papers and 11.3 GCSEs and GCE A/AS and GNVQs7 NC test papers and 11.3 GCSEs and GCE A/AS and GNVQs7 NC test papers and 11.7 GCSEs and GCE VCE and A/AS

Notes:

1. Key Stage 1 tests for seven year-olds were introduced nationally in 1991.

Key Stage 2 tests for 11-year-olds were introduced nationally in 1995.

Key Stage 3 tests for 14-year-olds were introduced nationally in 1993.

2. The number of papers taken for GCSE and GCE A/AS/VCE and GNVQ vary for each subject.

3. The increase in the number of National Curriculum tests from 7 to 20 for 14-year-olds and from 7 to 20 for 16-year-olds reflects the fact that they were the cohort who took the first Key Stage 2 tests in 1994/95.

4. The increase for 16-and 18-year-olds in 2002 is due to the average points increase in GCSEs.