Skip to main content

Term-Time Working

Volume 406: debated on Monday 9 June 2003

The text on this page has been created from Hansard archive content, it may contain typographical errors.

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry (1) how the hourly rate for full-time, term-time workers is calculated; and whether it is based on a full year's employment; [116692](2) whether a full-time, term-time worker is entitled to the same amount of annual leave and Bank holidays as colleagues who are paid for the full year; [116690](3) whether a full-time, term-time worker in education is classified as a part-time worker, as defined in the part-time Workers' (Prevention of Less Favourable Treatment) Regulations 2000. [116691]

Subject to the National Minimum Wage provisions, hourly rates of pay are a matter for negotiation and agreement.This Government believe that employers can gain significant business advantages by introducing a range of flexible working opportunities in the workplace for employees. These options might include term-time working—whether this is a suitable option will depend on the needs of individuals, work teams and above all, the needs of the business.All workers have an entitlement to four weeks paid holiday a year. The entitlement of workers who work less than a full year will depend on their employment contract. Time off on bank holidays has never been a statutory entitlement, any right is either determined by the employees' contract or at the discretion of the employer.For the purposes of the Part-time Workers (Prevention of Less Favourable Treatment) Regulations 2000, a full-time worker is a worker who works the normal full-time hours for the business and a part-time worker is a worker who works less than the normal full-time hours for the business.Subject to this employers are free to decide for their own purposes what constitutes a part-time or a full-time post and this applies to workers in education.