Skip to main content

Prisoners (Health Care)

Volume 408: debated on Friday 11 July 2003

The text on this page has been created from Hansard archive content, it may contain typographical errors.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many (a) nurses and (b) doctors are available to provide health care services to patients in each prison in England and Wales (i) for 24 hours in each day, (ii) for 12 hours in each day, (iii) every other day, (iv) twice a week and (v) once a week; and if he will make a statement. [123308]

Information is not available in the form requested. Under the Prison Act 1952 every prison must have a medical officer. The provision of health services in an establishment is organised around its health care centre.Health care centres fall into one of four categories according to the level of service provided and are staffed appropriately to fulfil their particular function. There are 23 type one and 45 type two health care centres at which only daytime health care cover is provided, generally by part-time staff in the former and full-time staff in the latter. There are 68 type three health care centres, which have in-patient facilities and 24-hour nurse cover, and four type four facilities, which have the same level of provision but act as national or regional assessment centres.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what proportion of medication provided in prisons that would normally be administered in tablet form is given in liquid form to prevent storage of medication by prisoners; and if he will make a statement. [123307]

Information is not available in the form requested. Prisons have a risk assessment process that will be undertaken before a prisoner is allowed to have medication in their possession. Not all medication can be made available in liquid form. Prison Health has published, "A Pharmacy Service for Prisoners", available at www.doh.gov.uk/prisonhealth, which will help prisons to develop their pharmacy services.