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Pilot Training

Volume 409: debated on Friday 18 July 2003

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To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many (a) RAF, (b) Fleet Air Arm and (c) Army personnel have completed training for (i) Fast Jet, (ii) rotary and (iii) multi-engine aircraft types in each of the past five years. [126143]

The number of personnel who have completed training in each of the last five years is:

RAF1
Fast Jet (FJ)Rotary Wing (RW)Multi-engine (ME)
1998–99553653
1999–2000534163
2000–01554466
2001–02762842
2002–03734262
1 These figures include all officer aircrew including pilots and weapon systems officers. They do not include non-commissioned aircrew, as these cannot be broken down by aircraft type.
Fleet Air Arm2
Fast Jet (FJ)Rotary Wing (RW)
1998–99446
1999–2000445
2000–01357
2001–02964
2002–03760
2 These figures include all Royal Navy aircrew including pilots observers and aircrewmen.

Army

3

Rotary Wing (RW)

1998–9972
1999–200071
2000–0159
2001–0234
2002–0346

3 These figures include all personnel who passed the Joint Elementary Training System Army Pilot Course.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the requirement has been for trained pilots for all three services in each year since 1996–97; and how many trained pilots have entered the services in those years. [126145]

The requirement for trained pilots for all three services and the numbers entering the Services since 1996–97 are as follows:

Requirement1Gains to trained strength (GTS)2
RAF
1997–98133100
1998–99133110
1999–2000133135
1900–01138133
1901–02138121
1902–03145159
Royal Navy
1997–983624
1998–994229
1999–20004229
2000–014234
2001–024646
2002–034443
Army3
19997472
20007571
20016159
200256434
1 Requirement is defined as pilots completing a full course of training including operational Conversion Unit.
2 GTS figures include newly trained pilots and transfers from other Services and countries.
3 Figures before 1999 are not readily available due to changes in the Training programmeassociated with the formation of the Joint Helicopter Command.
4 Training courses were affected by the Foot and Mouth epidemic

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the strength of qualified flying instructors has been in each year since 1997–98. [126147]

The following table details the strength of RAF qualified flying instructors:

Strength
1997828
1998764
1999705
2000701
2001660
2002637
2003626

The following table gives the strength of Army qualified flying instructors.

Strength

19973
19985
19995
20006
20018
20029
20038

The Royal Navy currently has 167 flying instructors. Historical figures are not readily available.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much has been spent on (a) initial and (b) operational pilot training in each year since 1996–97. [126144]

The table shows the cost of initial pilot training in each year since 1999–2000 on an outturn basis. Resource accounting was introduced in 1999–2000 and no comparative figures are available prior to this. It has not been possible to provide the costs of operational pilot training, as the information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

£ million
Financial yearPhase 1Phase 2Total
1999–20003.074194.123197.197
2000–013.298196.656199.954
2001–023.219195.773198.992
2002–033.256226.3061229.562
1 The effects of the Quinquennial Review on Tangible Assets have affected the costs of flying training in FY 2002–03.