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Lotteries

Volume 447: debated on Monday 5 June 2006

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what plans she has to restrict the ability of gambling operations to market lottery style betting games. (74566)

My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State does not have any plans to impose conditions to operating licences under section 68 of the Gambling Act 2005 in relation to lottery style betting games.

The Gambling Act 2005 sets out the definitions of different types of gambling activity, and provides that it is a criminal offence to offer facilities for gambling without authorisation.

However, should the Commission consider that there is a regulatory need to do so, it does have powers under section 79 of the Act to impose conditions on operators which relate to the manner, nature and circumstances (including marketing) of licensed activities (including lottery style betting games).

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport when she will announce her decision on the review by the Gambling Commission, of the legal limits on the size of (a) prizes and (b) proceeds of society lotteries. (71627)

We are currently considering the Gambling Commission's review of the limits on the prizes and proceeds for society lotteries, and will make an announcement in due course.

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport whether it is Government policy to encourage competition between the National Lottery and society lotteries. (71629)

The Government believe that society lotteries and the National Lottery can co-exist happily. Both types of lottery play an important role in raising money for good causes, and it is our policy to ensure that appropriate and proportionate regulation applies in each case. Society lotteries are required to abide by strict limits on proceeds and prizes, currently up to £2 million and £200,000 respectively in any single lottery. We are supporting the work of society lotteries by introducing a range of deregulatory measures through the Gambling Act 2005, and by strengthening the protection for society lotteries from illegal lotteries that purport to be prize competitions in certain media outlets. The National Lottery continues to be regulated under separate legislation.