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Alcohol-related Diseases

Volume 447: debated on Tuesday 13 June 2006

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people were admitted to hospital with alcohol-related diseases in Greater London in (a) 2002-03, (b) 2003-04 and (c) 2004-05. (75750)

Data on the counts of finished consultant episodes (FCEs) and patients where there was a primary diagnosis for selected alcohol-related diseases by London Strategic Health Authority (SHA) for the years 2002-03, 2003-04 and 2004-05 are shown in the table.

Counts of FCEs and patients where there was a primary diagnosis code for selected alcohol related diseases1 in national health service hospitals in London SHAs 2002-03 to 2004-05

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

SHA

FCEs

Patients

FCEs

Patients

FCEs

Patients

North West London

1,760

1,280

1,951

1,426

2,305

1,533

North Central London

1,358

897

1,386

932

1,828

1,200

North East London

1,376

943

1,697

1,122

1,828

1,183

South East London

2,158

1,572

2,506

1,857

3,249

2,275

South West London

1,049

787

1,306

957

1,530

1,082

Total London SHAs

7,701

5,428

8,846

6,228

10,740

7,145

1 Alcohol related diseases defined as following ICD-10 codes recorded in primary diagnosis: F10: Mental and behavioural disorders due to use of alcohol K70: Alcoholic liver disease T51: Toxic effect of alcohol Notes: Finished consultant episode (FCE): A FCE is defined as a period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. Figures do not represent the number of patients, as a person may have more than one episode of care within the year.

Patient counts:

Patient counts are based on the unique patient identifier hospital episode statistics identifier (HESID). This identifier is derived based on patient's date of birth, postcode, sex, local patient identifier and NHS number, using an agreed algorithm. Where data are incomplete, HESID might erroneously link episodes or fail to recognise episodes for the same patient. Care is therefore needed, especially where duplicate records persist in the data. The patient count cannot be summed across a table where patients may have episodes in more than one cell.

Diagnosis (primary diagnosis):

The primary diagnosis is the first of up to 14 (seven prior to 2002-03) diagnosis fields in the hospital episode statistics (HES) data set and provides the main reason why the patient was in hospital.

Primary care trust (PCT) and SHA data quality:

PCT and SHA data were added to historic data-years in the HES database using 2002-03 boundaries, as a one-off exercise in 2004. The quality of the data on PCT of treatment and SHA of treatment is poor in 1996-97, 1997-98 and 1998-99, with over a third of all finished episodes having missing values in these years. Data quality of PCT of general practitioner (GP) practice and SHA of GP practice in 1997-98 and 1998-99 is also poor, with a high proportion missing values where practices changed or ceased to exist. There is less change in completeness of the residence-based fields over time, where the majority of unknown values are due to missing postcodes on birth episodes. Users of time series analysis including these years need to be aware of these issues in their interpretation of the data.

5. Ungrossed data:

Figures have not been adjusted for shortfalls in data, that is the data are ungrossed.

Source:

Hospital episode statistics (HES), the Information Centre for health and social care.