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Registered Disabled (Mobility Aids)

Volume 447: debated on Wednesday 14 June 2006

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what assessment he has made of (a) the number of registered disabled persons who use cycles of various kinds as mobility aids, (b) the extent of the mobility benefits provided as a result of the use of (i) cycles and (ii) other mobility aids and (c) the status of cycles as a mobility aid in relation to Parts 3 and 5 of the Disability Discrimination Act. (63625)

Information on the number of registered disabled persons who use cycles of various kinds as mobility aids is not available.

There are several types of cycles on the market designed for use by disabled people. However, we have made no assessment of the extent to which they, or other forms of cycles, are used as mobility aids and information to inform such an assessment is not held centrally. The extent to which cycles benefit the mobility of disabled people when compared with other forms of mobility aids has therefore not been determined.

Similarly, we have made no assessment of the status of cycles as a mobility aid in relation to duties under Part 3 or Part 5 of the Disability Discrimination Act 1995. Part 3 of the Act includes provisions which place duties on service providers not to discriminate against disabled people and to make reasonable adjustments for disabled people in the way that they provide their services. Since 5 December 2005, the duties in Part 3 have started to be extended in stages to more areas, including private clubs, public bodies in their carrying out of public functions, and letting of premises. An adjustment for a disabled person who required a cycle as a mobility aid would need to be considered by those with duties under the Act when deciding what may be a reasonable adjustment to make. Factors such as the cost and practicability of making an adjustment, and the resources available to the service provider, private club or landlord may be taken into account in deciding what is reasonable in any individual situation.

Part 5 of the Act concerns accessibility regulations for all land-based public transport (trains, buses, coaches and taxis) rather than private modes of transport.