Skip to main content

Summer Schemes

Volume 448: debated on Tuesday 4 July 2006

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many special needs children took part in summer schemes in each board area in each of the last four years; how long the summer schemes last in each board area; and if he will make a statement. (80115)

The number of children with special educational needs attending summer schemes in special schools and the duration of these schemes, in each of the last four years, is set out in the following tables.

The education and library boards do not have a statutory duty to provide summer schemes for children with special educational needs. They do so, however, subject to available resources and in partnership with local health and social services trusts and district councils.

Belfast education and library board

Number of children

Duration of summer scheme

2002

128

14-21 days July/August

2003

172

14-21 days July/August

2004

161

14-21 days July /August

2005

270

14-21 days July/August

North eastern education and library board

Number of children

Duration of summer scheme

2002

307

2 x 7 day schemes

2003

300

2 x 7 day schemes

2004

301

2 x 7 day schemes

2005

315

2 x 5 day schemes

South eastern education and library board

Number of children

Duration of summer scheme

2002

310

14 days

2003

320

13 days

2004

340

13 days

2005

325

10 days

Southern education and library board

Number of children

Duration of summer scheme

2002

241

14 days

2003

243

14 days

2004

252

14 days

2005

243

14 days

Western education and library board

Number of children

Duration of summer scheme

2002

163

14 days

2003

168

14 days

2004

172

14 days

2005

164

14 days

Earmarked funding has been provided by the Department of Education, for education and library boards to use in the organisation of summer schemes in literacy and numeracy. In addition the Department is also aware that some schools finance summer schemes using other resources. Information on the number of children with special educational needs attending these schemes could be provided only at disproportionate cost.