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Causes of Death

Volume 448: debated on Tuesday 4 July 2006

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many (a) males and (b) females aged (i) 14 to 16, (ii) 17 to 21, (iii) 22 to 24, (iv) 25 to 30, (v) 31 to 35 and (vi) 36 to 40 years died as a result of (A) road traffic accidents, (B) suicide, (C) sexually transmitted diseases, (D) drug misuse, (E) alcohol misuse and (F) murder/manslaughter in (1) Southend-on-Sea, (2) Essex, (3) Hertfordshire, (4) the Metropolitan police area of London, (5) the City of London police area and (6) England and Wales in each year since 1986. (81241)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the National Statistician, who has been asked to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 4 July 2006:

As National Statistician I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question asking how many (a) males and (b) females aged (i) 14 to 16, (ii) 17 to 21, (iii) 22 to 24, (iv) 25 to 30, (v) 31 to 35 and (vi) 36 to 40 years died as a result of (A) road traffic accidents, (B) suicide, (C) sexually transmitted diseases, (D) drug misuse, (E) alcohol misuse and (F) murder/manslaughter in (1) Southend-on-Sea, (2) Essex, (3) Hertfordshire, (4) the Metropolitan Police area of London, (5) the City of London Police area and (6) England and Wales in each year since 1986.

ONS routinely publishes numbers of deaths for causes which may be sexually transmitted, such as HIV or Hepatitis B infection. Information is not however normally available from the death certificate on the actual method of transmission for deaths from these causes and so figures for sexually transmitted diseases cannot be provided. Mortality data are not available for Police Areas, therefore we have provided figures for the London borough of City of London and for London Government Office Region.

The most recently available information is for deaths registered in 2005. Figures for deaths in males and females aged 14 to 40 years for land transport accidents, suicide or injury/poisoning of undetermined intent, alcohol-related causes, and assault are shown in the attached tables for each year from 1988 to 2005. I am placing copies of these tables in the House of Commons Library. Data for 1986 and 1987 are not available for area boundaries that are consistent with subsequent years and have not therefore been provided. Figures for drug misuse are only available from a special database containing deaths occurring from 1993-2004.