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Healthcare-acquired Infections

Volume 448: debated on Tuesday 11 July 2006

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many hospital patients have (a) contracted and (b) died from exposure to healthcare-acquired infections in the constituency of North-West Cambridgeshire since 1997. (82248)

[holding answer 5 July 2006]: The information requested is not available in the format requested. However, data for meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) blood stream infections, Clostridium difficile reports and glycopeptide resistant enterococci (GRE) blood stream infections have been set out in the following tables.

Meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus

Number of MRSA bacteraemias

April to March each year:

Trusts in North West Cambridgeshire constituency

2001-02

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

Hinchingbrooke Healthcare NHS Trust

12

25

26

12

Peterborough and Stamford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

12

10

10

16

Clostridium difficile reports and glycopeptide resistant enterococci (GRE) blood stream infections

Trusts in North West Cambridgeshire constituency

Number of Clostridium difficile reports for patients 65 and over January 2004 to December 2004

Number of Glycopeptide resistant enterococci (GRE) blood stream infections reports October 2003 to September 2004

Hinchingbrooke Healthcare NHS Trust

73

1

Peterborough and Stamford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

166

0

Notes:

Information on deaths due to hospital acquired infections is not available. The Office for National Statistics publishes statistics on deaths with Clostridium difficile1 or MRSA2 mentioned on the death certificate. However, no information is available on where these infections were acquired either in terms of hospital or community acquisition or of strategic health authority.

1 Deaths involving Clostridium difficile: England and Wales, 1999 to 2004 Health Statistics Quarterly 30, summer 2006, pp56-60

2 Deaths involving MRSA: England and Wales, 2000 to 2004 Health Statistics Quarterly 29, spring 2006, pp63-8.

Source:

Health Protection Agency

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many hospital patients have (a) contracted and (b) died from exposure to MRSA or similar infections in each year since 1997. (82454)

[holding answer 5 July 2006]: The information requested is not available. The best available information is from the mandatory surveillance system which provides data on the number of reports of meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) blood stream infections from April 2001 to 30 September 2005 as shown in the table. Figures from October 2005 to March 2006 will be published later this month.

MRSA blood stream infections in England from 1 April 2001 to 30 September 2005

Period

Number of MRS bloodstream infections

1 April 2001 to 30 March 2002

7,281

1 April 2002 to 30 March 2003

7,390

1 April 2003 to 30 March 2004

7,705

1 April 2004 to 30 March 2005

7,214

1 April 2005 to 30 September 2005

3,580

Source:

Health Protection Agency

The total number of reports of Clostridium difficile associated disease in England between January and December 2004 was 44,350 and the total number of reports of clinically significant glycopeptide resistant enterococci blood stream infections in England from October 2003 to September 2004 was 620.

A national prevalence survey of hospital acquired infection was carried out this spring and interim results will be published in the autumn.

Information on deaths due to hospital acquired infections is not available. The Office for National Statistics publish statistics on deaths with Clostridium difficile1 or MRSA2 mentioned on the death certificate. However, no information is available on where these infections were acquired, either in terms of hospital or community acquisition or of strategic health authority.

1 Deaths involving Clostridium difficile. England and Wales, 1999 to 2004 Health Statistics Quarterly 30, summer 2006, pp56-60

2 Deaths involving MRSA: England and Wales, 2000 to 2004 Health Statistics Quarterly 29, spring 2006, pp63-8.