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Written Answers

Volume 449: debated on Wednesday 19 July 2006

Written Answers to Questions

Tuesday 18 July 2006

Scotland

Carbon Emissions

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what recent estimate he has made of the carbon emissions of his Department; what commitment he has made to reducing such emissions; and if he will make a statement. (81054)

The Scotland Office subscribes to the energy efficiency policies adopted by the Department for Constitutional Affairs.

I refer the hon. Member to the reply given by the Under-Secretary of State, my hon. Friend the Member for Lewisham, East (Bridget Prentice), on 10 July 2006, Official Report, column 1615W.

Departmental Travel

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what plans he has to ensure that all flights undertaken by Ministers and officials in his Department are carbon neutral; and if he will make a statement. (81381)

The Scotland Office subscribes to the principles of environmental performance adopted by the Department for Constitutional Affairs.

I refer the hon. Member to the reply given by the Under-Secretary of State, my hon. Friend the Member for Lewisham, East (Bridget Prentice), on 6 July 2006, Official Report, column 1344W.

Environmental Management

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland whether his Department (a) is committed to the achievement of environmental management to ISO 14001 standard and (b) has been externally certified as in compliance with that standard; and if he will make a statement. (81189)

The Scotland Office subscribes to the environmental management principles adopted by the Department for Constitutional Affairs.

I refer the hon. Member to the reply given by the Under-Secretary of State, my hon. Friend the Member for Lewisham, East (Bridget Prentice), on 13 July 2006, Official Report, column 1992W

Private Members’ Bills

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland which Private Members' Bills were drafted by his Department in each session since 1997; and which subsequently received Royal Assent. (78840)

Since the Scotland Office was established on 1 July 1999, one private Member’s Bill has been drafted and has subsequently received Royal Assent—my Sunday Working (Scotland) Act 2003.

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will list those Private Members' Bills in respect of which his Department has adopted a policy of neutrality in each session since 2001-02; and if he will make a statement. (72484)

The Scotland Office has not adopted a policy of neutrality on any of the private Members' Bills since session 2001-02 for which it had the lead interest.

Scottish Affairs Select Committee

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what action has been taken by his Department to implement Scottish Affairs Select Committee recommendations since the 2001-02 session; and if he will make a statement. (78843)

The Government have responded to the Scottish Affairs Select Committee's recommendations in the period in question in the following published memoranda:

Session 2001-02

The Drinks Industry in Scotland: Response by the Government and the Scottish Executive (HC 696), published on 18 March 2002.

Customs Services in Scotland: Response by the Government (HC 1287), published on 5 November 2002

Session 2002-03

Employment in Shipbuilding on the Clyde: Response by the Government (HC 199), published on 19 December 2002

Homeworkers in Scotland and the Minimum Wage: Response by the Government (HC 816), published on 19 June 2003

Session 2003-04

The Coincidence of Parliamentary Constituency Boundaries in Scotland and the Consequences of Change: Response by the Government (HC514), published on 7 April 2004

The Proposed Whisky Strip Stamp: Response by the Government (HC 822), published on 5 July 2004

Session 2005-06

Meeting Scotland's Future Energy Needs: Government Response (HC 579), published on 24 October 2005

Each memorandum stated whether the Government accepted the recommendations in the relevant report.

Northern Ireland

Access to Work Scheme

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many disabled staff in his Department received support through the Access to Work scheme (a) in each of the last five years and (b) in 2006-07. (82231)

The table provides information on the numbers of NIO staff with disabilities for whom NIO requested support through the Access to Work scheme. This relates to the provision of workplace assessments to identify individual needs and recommend special aids and equipment and, where applicable, the provision of assistance with the cost of providing reasonable adjustments. While the scheme also assists with the cost of travel to work, the Department has no knowledge of assistance provided for NIO staff, as individuals must apply direct to the scheme.

Number

2001-02

2

2002-03

2

2003-04

2

2004-05

4

2005-06

1

2006-07

11

1 To date.

Building Regulations

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what measures are in place to assess compliance with building regulations in Northern Ireland. (80954)

Northern Ireland Civil Service Departments do not hold this information. Enforcement of building regulations is the responsibility of district councils. Having written to district councils I can confirm that Building Control employ professionally qualified and trained staff to carry out independent and impartial plan assessments and detailed inspection of all sites to ensure compliance. Applicants must notify Building Control at various stages of projects, and if remedial action is necessary, it is always carried out prior to the issue of the completion certificate.

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many homes built in the last 10 years in Northern Ireland do not comply with environmental building regulations. (80953)

Northern Ireland civil service departments do not hold this information. Enforcement of building regulations is the responsibility of district councils. Having written to district councils I can confirm that no homes built in the last 10 years contravene the environmental building regulations.

Further Education

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what provision for those with (a) mental health difficulties and (b) learning disability is offered by further education colleges in the Province. (83728)

The Department for Employment and Learning is unable to provide the information in the format requested but can confirm that in 2004-05, the last year for which figures are available, further education colleges in Northern Ireland enrolled 14,231 students with learning difficulties and/or disabilities on a range of mainstream courses and, where more appropriate, on courses designed specifically for students with learning difficulties. FE colleges have also been provided with additional resources to make such physical adjustments as may be required to assist those with disabilities and learning difficulties.

Prisons

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what the cost was of providing assistance to prisoners in Northern Ireland to cease smoking in each of the last three years. (78738)

The information requested is not available for 2003 and 2004.

In 2005 the cost of providing nicotine replacement patches under prescription to prisoners was £12,082.09 and for the period 1 January to 31 May 2006 the cost was £4,692.45.

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many prisoners have absconded from custody in Northern Ireland in each of the last five years. (80444)

The Northern Ireland Prison Service undertakes a thorough risk assessment prior to decisions being taken in respect of prisoner release, and has a low incidence of absconds.

The Northern Ireland Prison Service classifies absconds as prisoners released from lawful custody under Rule 27(2), who are accompanied outside the confines of the prison establishment.

Numbers of prisoners absconding from custody - 2001 to date

Maghaberry

Magilligan

Hydebank Wood

2001

1

1

1

2002

2

1

1

2003

2

1

1

2004

1

2005

1

2006

2

1

Total

9

4

3

Road Improvements

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what improvements are planned for the A26 road between Ballymena and Coleraine over the next two years. (85725)

The Acting Chief Executive of Roads Service, Mr. Geoff Allister, has been asked to write to the hon. Gentleman in response to this question.

Letter from Geoff Allister, dated 18 July 2006:

You recently asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland a Parliamentary Question regarding what improvements are planned for the A26 road between Ballymena and Coleraine over the next two years.

As this issue falls within my responsibility as Acting Chief Executive of Roads Service, I have been asked to reply.

I have to advise that there are no planned improvements for the A26 between Ballymena and Coleraine over the next two years.

Statutory Instruments

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland on what occasions a statutory instrument sponsored by his Department has been reported by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments as defective since October 2005. (85180)

Two statutory instruments sponsored by my Department since October 2005 have been reported by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments as defective. Details are as follows:

(a) The Prison and Young Offenders Centre (Amendment) Rules (Northern Ireland) 2005 (S.R. 2005/153). See the Fourth Report of the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments for session 2005-06, published on 19 October 2005; and

(b) The Pollution Prevention and Control (Amendment) and Connected Provisions (No. 2) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2005 (S.R. 2005 No. 285). See Sixth Report of the JCSI for 2005-06, published on 26 October 2005.

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Avian Flu

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs pursuant to his answer of 8 June 2006, Official Report, column 1341W, on avian influenza, when and in what manner the discussion took place between a departmental official with Mr. Steve Moon at which an offer was extended to Mr. Moon, or another representative of the Association of Local Government Ecologists, to participate in the avian influenza stakeholder group; and who the official was. (81142)

There appears to have been some misunderstanding over this matter. A Defra official has written to Mr. Moon to express regret for this. I have also written to the Secretary of the Association of Local Government Ecologists inviting the association to participate in the AI Stakeholder Group.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what his policy is on the vaccination of domestic birds against avian influenza; and if he will make a statement. (85232)

The advice from the Chief Veterinary Officer (CVO) is that we should not vaccinate poultry in advance of an avian influenza outbreak, or as an immediate disease control response. Although currently available vaccines are able to reduce mortality, it is possible that some vaccinated birds would still be capable of transmitting the disease if they become infected, but might not display symptoms of disease. This would increase the time taken to detect and eradicate the virus. High standards of surveillance and biosecurity, early reporting of suspect cases and culling remain the most effective ways of preventing avian influenza and tackling an outbreak.

However, as I informed the House on 11 July, in order to be fully prepared we have invited tenders to supply us with a further 10 million doses of avian influenza vaccine for potential use in poultry and other captive birds. This is not a change in policy. The CVO has recommended this step as part of sensible contingency planning in the light of uncertainties about the future spread and nature of the virus, and the possibility of as yet unforeseen circumstances. The vaccine would only be used if a risk assessment and scientific evidence indicated it would help to prevent disease spread.

Fisheries

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what the status is of the investigation into possible blackfish landings of pelagic fish. (86438)

This is an issue for the Scottish Executive. As it is an ongoing investigation we are unable to comment.

Fly-tipping

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many fly-tipping incidents were recorded by Flycapture in 2004-05, broken down by local authority area. (85710)

Data on fly-tipping incidents recorded by each local authority on the Flycapture database between April 2004 and March 2005 have been placed in the Library of the House.

Waste

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if he will estimate how many (a) mobile telephones and (b) printer cartridges were (i) recycled, (ii) reused overseas and (iii) disposed of within the waste stream in the last 12 months. (84068)

This Department does not collect information on the recycling or reuse of mobile phones or printer cartridges. The mobile phone industry estimates that 18 million handsets are replaced every year and that in 2003 and 2004, about five million handsets were collected by mobile phone recycling and refurbishment companies in the UK. The industry estimates that about 60 per cent. of these were refurbished and the remaining 40 per cent. were sent for materials recycling.

Trade and Industry

Administrative Savings

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what administrative savings have been made by his Department in each of the last eight years. (34937)

The Department's annual reports contain information on departmental management and public service delivery, including on measures taken to improve efficiency and value for money.

For the years 1997-98 and 1998-99, value for money and efficiency savings were not reported separately in the Department's annual reports but were contained within the chapters on the management of the Department.

During the period covered by the 1998 Comprehensive Spending Review (1999-2002), the Department had a strategic efficiency target to achieve savings of 2.5 per cent. of its running costs each year. In 1999-2000 DTI achieved a saving of 2.6 per cent. of running costs (£10.6 million on projected costs of £406.6 million); and in 2000-01 a saving of 4.6 per cent. (£19.3 million on projected costs of £418.8 million).

The CSR98 efficiency target was replaced for the 2000 Spending Review period (2001-04) by a Public Service Agreement Target to “achieve value for money improvements of 2.5 per cent. a year across the Department”, which was carried over into the 2002 Spending Review (2003-06). In 2001-02 value for money improvements under this target amounted to 3.79 per cent. (£16 million on projected costs of £422.3 million); and in 2002-03 amounted to 4.5 per cent. (£20.2 million on projected costs of £449.9 million).

Value for money improvements related to administration under the SR2002 PSA12 value for the money target amounted to £35.4 million in 2003-04 and £351.7 million in 2004-05. The Department's performance for 2005-06 against this PSA target will be covered in the 2006 departmental report, which was due to be published in spring 2006.

In the 2004 Spending Review the Department committed to achieve annual efficiencies of at least £380 million by 2007-08. The 2005 Autumn Performance Report, published last December, provides the most recent assessment of the Department's performance against this target. £27.97 million efficiency gains related to administration spend were achieved by the end of Quarter 2.

Airbus

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what Government grants were awarded to BAE Systems for the purchase of shares in Airbus in 1979. (82416)

The Department has no record of grants being given to either British Aerospace or its successor BAE Systems for the purchase of shares in Airbus.

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what the cost (a) gross and (b) net after loan repayments was of support by the UK Government to Airbus programmes in each year since 1985. (83570)

Launch investment is a risk-sharing Government investment in the design and development of civil aerospace projects in the UK. It is not a loan. The investment is repayable at a real rate of return, usually via levies on sales of the product.

The amounts paid to Airbus in launch investment and the amounts received from Airbus in repayment of launch investment in each of the years from 1984-85 to 2005-06 inclusive are set out in the following table, with the net figures (Receipts-Payments) in the final column.

£ million

Payments

Receipts

Net

1984/85

46.5

0.0

-46.5

1985-86

73.0

0.0

-73.0

1986-87

86.0

0.0

-86.0

1987-88

44.5

0.0

-44.5

1988-89

87.8

0.0

-87.8

1989-90

122.5

10.0

-112.5

1990-91

134.0

34.0

-100.0

1991-92

73.5

55.4

-18.1

1992-93

28.6

40.9

12.3

1993-94

0.0

29.4

29.4

1994-95

0.0

19.2

19.2

1995-96

0.0

29.3

29.3

1996-97

0.0

42.7

42.7

1997-98

0.0

85.4

85.4

1998-99

0.0

134.6

134.6

1999-2000

0.0

167.4

167.4

2000-01

0.0

119.7

119.7

2001-02

136.0

103.4

-32.6

2002-03

139.0

88.7

-50.3

2003-04

255.0

78.3

-176.7

2004-05

0.0

91.7

91.7

2005-06

0.0

110.5

110.5

Total

1,226.4

1,240.5

14.1

Businesses (Peterborough)

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry how many businesses in (a) Peterborough constituency and (b) the Peterborough city council area (i) started up and (ii) ceased trading in each of the last nine years; and if he will make a statement. (85970)

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 16 June 2006, Official Report, columns 1484-85, which contains data for each year starting nine years ago up to the latest available.

Canatxx

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry whether (a) he has and (b) Ministers in his Department have received official hospitality from Canatxx Ventures Ltd and Canatxx UK and its associated companies in the last four years. (85272)

No DTI Ministers have received official hospitality from Canatxx UK Ltd, Canatxx Energy Ventures Ltd or any of its associated companies in the last four years.

Civil Service Secondees

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry how many people from science and technology backgrounds have been seconded into the civil service in his Department in each of the last three years. (48412)

The DTI has had and continues to have people seconded who have science and technology backgrounds. Where an S and T background is an essential requirement for a secondment we will take the appropriate steps to check the applicant’s qualifications.

The DTI has had a number of people seconded from science and technology backgrounds in the last three years, although we do not hold this information centrally. As the Department dedicated to maximising the contribution of the science and technology fields to the UK’s economic development—and the quality of our lives—we are delighted to have such expertise within the DTI.

Miners’ Compensation

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry which solicitors have received payments under the (a) vibration white finger and (b) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease conditional fee agreement for coal health compensation claims for claims registered by claimants living in Leicester, South constituency; and whether Vendside Ltd has received any payment from his Department for coal health compensation claims registered by claimants living in that constituency. (84113)

Conditional fee agreements do not form part of either the vibration white finger (VWF) or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) schemes. Solicitors are paid according to a tariff set out in the respective Claims Handling Agreement. The tables list the solicitors, including Vendside/UDM, that have received payments in accordance with those tariffs for representing claimants from the Leicester, South constituency:

VWF

Solicitor

Costs paid (£)

Ashton Morton Slack Solicitors

757

Beresfords Solicitors

470

Moss Solicitors

4,678

Oxley and Coward Solicitors

2,697

Vendside / UDM

1,351

Watson Burton LLP

737

Total

10,690

OPD

Solicitor

Costs paid (£)

Ashton Morton Slack Solicitors

1,770

Atteys

3,393

Avalon Solicitors

10,495

Beresfords Solicitors

8,543

Blackett Hart and Pratt Solicitors

1,223

BRM Solicitors

4,175

Browell Smith and Co.

6,059

Delta Legal

2,586

Bac Solicitors

2,977

Dodds and Partners

2,888

Gorman Hamilton Solicitors

5,451

Hugh James

15,562

Irwin Mitchell Solicitors

2,079

Kidd and Spoor Harper Solicitors

1,834

Mark Gilbert Morse

9,066

Marrons Solicitors

1,090

Moss Solicitors

46,148

O. H. Parsons and Partners Solicitors

3,055

Proddow and Mackay Solicitors

2,963

Raleys Solicitors

1,792

Thompsons Solicitors

5,659

Vendside Ltd

10,557

Watson Burton LLP

23,393

Wilson Browne incorp. Holyoak and Co.

3,055

Total

175,814

In addition, Vendside have been paid an additional £2,333 in costs for handling claims for Industrial Deafness for Leicester, South constituents which are dealt with under common law.

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry which mining contractors have signed the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease claims handling agreement with his Department. (85431)

[holding answer 14 July 2006]: I refer my hon. Friend to the answer I gave him on 12 May 2006, Official Report, columns 576-77W.

Departmental Expenditure

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry how much has been spent in each year since 1997 by his Department on salaries paid to civil servants. (41589)

The Department's expenditure on civil servants' salaries for 1998-99 to 2004-05 is detailed as follows. Figures from 1999-2000 are taken from the Department's Resource Accounts, which are published annually by the Stationery Office. Total resource budgets for 2002-03 and 2003-04 included exceptional provisions to reflect accounting adjustments in respect of the Department's liabilities. Prior to 1998-99, figures were not produced on the same basis and comparable figures are not available other than at disproportionate cost.

Financial year

£000

Percentage of total resource budget

1998-99

198,857

7.0

1999-2000

197,643

7.0

2000-01

211,943

4.8

2001-02

207,108

4.8

2002-03

217,359

3.0

2003-04

243,155

2.2

2004-05

232,200

4.6

Energy Review

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry which external consultants were contracted to process submissions to the energy review; what criteria were adopted in choosing the consultants; whether the contract was subject to competitive tender; what the total value was of each contract; what responsibility each consultant was given; and what the length was of each contract. (85540)

AEA Technology Environment were contracted, by competitive tender, to support the analysis of the submissions to the Energy Review consultation exercise.

Their report is on the DTI website at http://www.dti.gov.uk/files/file31631.pdf

Enterprise

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry pursuant to his oral statement of 4 May 2006, Official Report, column 537WH, on Enterprise, on what date the manufacturing day during enterprise week will be held. (85684)

Enterprise Week is to be held from 13 to 19 November 2006. On 14 November there will be a strong focus on the manufacturing sector, with regional events taking place led by industry.

Enterprise Insight

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry in which local authorities Enterprise Insight will be establishing local campaign hubs; on what basis these areas were selected; and how other local authorities can apply for campaign hubs to be based in their locality. (85679)

Local Enterprise Campaign Hubs are being set up in Coventry, Liverpool, Lowestoft, Tees Valley and Wakefield. The local authorities looking after these areas are Coventry city council, Liverpool city council, Waveney district council, Redcar and Cleveland borough council and Wakefield metropolitan district council respectively.

These areas were selected as they have low levels of entrepreneurial activity, and high levels of deprivation.

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what independent assessment has been made of the effectiveness of money spent by the Enterprise Insight campaign. (85682)

Enterprise Insight employs a variety of monitoring tools to assess the effectiveness on the campaign.

These include an annual survey that monitors young people's attitudes across the country and tracks changing levels of awareness of the campaign.

Enterprise Insight is currently commissioning an independent organisation to develop monitoring and evaluation systems for each enterprise campaign hub as it is rolled out. In early 2008, this organisation will produce an evaluation that will assess the impact of the campaign hubs.

Enterprise Insight has put in place a number of more specific monitoring tools that:

(a) Capture through on-line reporting all the events taking place during Enterprise Week.

(b) Independently, through ‘Growth from Knowledge—National Opinion Polls', run a post Enterprise Week survey of all organisations that ran activities during Enterprise Week.

(c) Independently monitor the level and range of media coverage.

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what (a) salary and (b) benefits are paid to the Chief Executive of Enterprise Insight; and what salary was advertised when this position was last vacant. (85683)

Enterprise Insight is an independent organisation, founded and run by the four main business organisations (Institute of Directors, British Chambers of Commerce, CBI and Federation of Small Businesses), with support from DTI.

The DTI’s Small Business Service co-funds Enterprise Insight, but the Enterprise Insight Board independently determines its staff remuneration levels.

Equal Pay

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry how many (a) women and (b) men are employed in the Department; what the average pay was for (i) women and (ii) men in the Department in (A) 1997 and (B) 2006; what women’s average pay is as a percentage of men’s average pay; and how many (1) women and (2) men the Department employed in each of the last five years, broken down by grade. (67780)

The Cabinet Office collects and publishes annually statistical information on the civil service by Department. This includes data on the employment of men and women. Information on the numbers of women and men employed in the civil service broken down at 31 December 2005 is available in the Libraries of the House and on the civil service website at:

www.civilservice.gov.uk/management/statistics/employment/index.asp

It should be borne in mind that the figures for DTI published by Cabinet Office include additional staff such as those employed in Executive agencies.

The Department of Trade and Industry (including UK Trade and Investment and Small Business Service, but excluding Executive agencies) employs (a) 1,682 women (1,596.3 full-time equivalent) and (b) 2,176 men (2,165.3 full-time equivalent) at 9 November 2005.

DTI measures equal pay for those not in the senior civil service as part of a regular and ongoing equal pay review programme. Equal pay is measured for the senior civil service by the Cabinet Office.

The average pay was for (i) women and (ii) men in the Department in (A) 2000-01 and (B) 2005-06 and what women’s average pay is as a percentage of men’s average pay are shown in the following table.

2000-01 is the earliest period for which an accurate comparison can be provided.

2005-06

2000-01

Women

25,740

20,011

Men

29,070

24,968

Women’s pay as percentage of men’s

88.5

80.2

The number of (1) women and (2) men the Department employed in three of the last five years, broken down by grade, is shown in the following table. Data for 2001, 2003 and 2005 are readily available having previously been used for other purposes. Data for 2002 and 2004 can be provided, but at disproportionate cost.

Permanent staff by responsibility level and gender: 2001, 2003 and 2005—Department of Trade and Industry (core staff including UKTI and SBS)

Headcount: Full-time staff

Responsibility level1

Male

Female

Total

Percentage female staff

1 February 2001

All non-industrial staff

2,374

1,537

3,911

39.3

SCS level

134

39

173

22.5

All staff below SCS level

2,240

1,498

3,738

40.1

Grades 6/7

543

184

727

25.3

SEO/HEO level

856

354

1,210

29.3

EO level

409

349

758

46.0

AO/AA level

432

611

1,043

58.6

3 April 2003

All non-industrial staff

2,446

1,717

4,163

41.2

SCS level

156

73

229

31.9

All staff below SCS level

2,290

1,644

3,934

41.8

Grades 6/7

548

245

793

30.9

SEO/HEO level

951

435

1,386

31.4

EO level

390

385

775

49.7

AO/AA level

401

579

980

59.1

Unknown

13

6

19

31.6

10 November 2005

All non-industrial staff

2,140

1,414

3,554

39.8

SCS level

136

46

182

25.3

All staff below SCS level

2,004

1,368

3,372

40.6

Grades 6/7

592

268

860

31.2

SEO/HEO level

844

441

1,285

34.3

EO level

307

307

614

50.0

AO/AA level

261

352

613

57.4

Headcount: Part-time staff

Responsibility level1

Male

Female

Total

Percentage female staff

1 February 2001

All non-industrial staff

33

246

279

88.2

SCS level

4

14

18

77.8

All staff below SCS level

29

232

261

88.9

Grades 6/7

4

51

55

92.7

SEO/HEO level

8

48

56

85.7

EO level

12

32

44

72.7

AO/AA level

5

101

106

95.3

3 April 2003

All non-industrial staff

46

301

347

86.7

SCS level

All staff below SCS level

46

301

347

86.7

Grades 6/7

14

63

77

81.8

SEO/HEO level

12

62

74

83.8

EO level

10

60

70

85.7

AO/AA level

10

116

126

92.1

Unknown

1

1

100.0

10 November 2005

All non-industrial staff

36

268

304

88.2

SCS level

4

11

15

73.3

All staff below SCS level

32

257

289

88.9

Grades 6/7

10

68

78

87.2

SEO/HEO level

12

62

74

83.8

EO level

6

38

44

86.4

AO/AA level

4

89

93

95.7

Full-time equivalent2

Responsibility level1

Male

Female

Total

Percentage female staff

1February 2001

All non-industrial staff

2,395.8

1,702.5

4,098.3

41.5

SCS level

137.2

49.4

186.7

26.5

All staff below SCS level

2,258.6

1,653.1

3,911.6

42.3

Grades 6/7

545.9

219.8

765.7

28.7

SEO/HEO level

861.3

386.6

1,247.8

31.0

EO level

415.5

370.7

786.2

47.2

AO/AA level

435.9

676.0

1,111.9

60.8

3 April 2003

All non-industrial staff

2,553.7

1,929.2

4,482.9

43.0

SCS level

156.6

69.8

226.4

30.8

All staff below SCS level

2,397.1

1,859.4

4,245.4

43.7

Grades 6/7

630.3

302.0

932.2

32.4

SEO/HEO level

962.9

476.8

1,439.7

33.1

EO level

395.7

426.6

822.3

51.9

AO/AA level

408.3

653.9

1,062.2

61.6

Unknown

13.0

6.7

19.7

34.0

10 November 2005

All non-industrial staff

2,165.3

1,596.3

3,761.6

42.4

SCS level

138.8

53.5

192.3

27.8

All staff below SCS level

2,026.5

1,542.8

3,569.2

43.2

Grades 6/7

599.6

316.2

915.8

34.5

SEO/HEO level

852.8

485.0

1,377.7

36.3

EO level

310.2

334.0

644.2

51.8

AO/AA level

263.8

407.7

671.5

60.7

1 This table shows staff in their substantive responsibility level, and therefore ignores the effect of temporary promotions. 2 Part-time staff are recorded according to the proportion of full-time hours worked.

Fuel Bills

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what the (a) mean and (b) median household (i) gas and (ii) electricity bill was in the last period for which figures are available; and if he will estimate the bill paid at each decile of income distribution in each case. (84736)

The Expenditure and Food Survey conducted by the Office for National Statistics showed that in 2004-05 the mean amount spent on gas was £287 per annum, while the mean amount spent on electricity was £313.

The median spend on gas was £271, while the median spend on electricity during 2004-05 was £276.

The amount of spend for the top of each decile in the distribution is shown for both gas and electricity in the table:

£

Annual spend on fuel according to position in spend decile (2004-05)

Decile (top of):

Gas

Electricity

1

0

44

2

0

156

3

130

199

4

221

241

5

271

277

6

325

317

7

373

373

8

445

456

9

577

574

Source: Office for National Statistics

Those in the lowest deciles of gas spend will pay nothing for their fuel due to a lack of connection to the gas network.

The amount spent on gas and electricity by each decile in the income distribution is as follows:

£

Annual spend on fuel per income decile1

Income decile

Gas

Electricity

Lowest

177

219

Second

219

250

Third

240

266

Fourth

266

287

Fifth

287

308

Sixth

292

318

Seventh

308

344

Eighth

339

360

Ninth

349

370

Tenth

417

428

1Source: Family Spending: A Report on the 2004-05 Expenditure and Food Survey (ONS: 2005)

Fuel Poverty

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what steps his Department is taking to eliminate fuel poverty in vulnerable households in England by 2010. (85461)

Responsibility for tackling fuel poverty in England is shared between the Department of Trade and Industry, and the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. Following the Energy Review, we will be taking forward work with energy suppliers and other key players to examine how the continuing challenge of fuel poverty can be best addressed. The Energy Review also commits us to looking hard at how we can maximise the contribution made by our existing schemes. The Department of Trade and Industry will play an important role in this analysis.

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs leads on the Warm Front scheme in England. The Warm Front scheme has resulted in improvements to the energy efficiency of the housing of those on a range of qualifying benefits and has provided assistance to over a million vulnerable households since 2000.

The Department of Trade and Industry itself has a number of policies to tackle the issue of fuel poverty. It has liaised closely with energy suppliers on the development of the Home Heat Helpline, which provides vulnerable customers and their representatives with a central point of information relating to the help available from their energy supplier and Government. It has encouraged the introduction of social tariffs and price freezes for fuel poor and low income customers.

The Department's Design and Demonstration Unit is a team of private sector secondees that works in support of Energy White Paper objectives. As part of the Unit's work, it has designed and delivered projects to provide gas connections to deprived communities, and it is now developing community projects utilising renewable technologies.

Fuel Prices

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what his estimate is of the difference in the average price of a litre of petrol in rural and non-rural areas in each year since 1997; and if he will make a statement. (85880)

I am not aware of any data source that provides information on rural and non-rural petrol prices. There is anecdotal evidence that petrol prices in rural areas are likely to be higher than non-rural areas.

There are a variety of reasons why this is likely to be the case. These include:

Fuel throughput, in that the higher the throughput the lower the retail margin required to give a return on the investment. Rural garages are likely to have lower throughputs.

Bulk delivery charges, many sites have relatively small storage tanks since they are cheaper to install. However, they require more frequent replenishment and this results in some sites paying higher delivery charges. Again smaller tanks are likely to be more prevalent is smaller, rural petrol stations.

Competition; large, particularly supermarket sites in close proximity to one another in urban areas do tend to lead to lower prices.

Regional petrol prices are available on the AA website at http://www.theaa.com/motoring_advice/fuel/index.html.

Home Computing Initiative

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what discussions he has had with representatives of the home computing industry about the consequences of the abolition of the Home Computing Initiative. (63837)

I would like to apologise to the hon. Member for the delay in replying to the matter raised. In response to his query I can confirm that the DTI has regular discussions with the industry on all matters of concern relevant to their sector.

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry on what date the Home Computing Initiative was made available to staff in his Department; and how many staff had (a) applied for and (b) expressed interest in the scheme before the Budget. (63838)

The Home Computing Initiative was made available to staff in DTI and Insolvency Service (an executive agency of DTI that is participating in the DTI scheme) on 15 March 2006 as part of a wider scheme incorporating computers, childcare and bikes.

Over 400 staff in DTI expressed an interest in the scheme when it was initially contemplated in mid-2005.

Sixty-four people had registered for computers in the period 15 to 22 March (Budget day) and approximately 240 had registered by the computer closing date of 30 March. These figures include staff from DTI and Insolvency Service.

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry if he will place in the Library the communications from his officials to HM Treasury on the home computing initiatives relating to the abolition of the tax exemption in the Budget. (66512)

I would like to apologise to the hon. Member for the delay in replying to the matter raised. In response to his query I can confirm that the DTI have regular discussion with the Treasury on budgetary initiatives.

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what the cost was of setting up his Department's Home Computing Initiative scheme, including consultancy and administrative costs. (66513)

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given to the hon. Member for South-West Hertfordshire (Mr. Gauke) on 20 April 2006, Official Report, column 762W.

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry when he was first informed by the Treasury of the withdrawal of the tax exemption for loaned computer equipment under the Home Computing Initiative Scheme. (64166)

[holding answer 18 April 2006]: I would like to apologise to the hon. Member for the delay in replying to the matter raised. In response to her query the DTI have regular discussions with the Treasury on budgetary issues.

Home Working

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry how many people in his Department have been enabled to work from home in each of the last three years; and if he will make a statement. (67998)

All members of staff with an appropriate job are allowed to work from home subject to their line manager's approval. Laptops have been provided to staff that allow access to the Department’s IT Systems. Many of these were configured to allow staff to share them.

2003-04

1,400 Laptops were in use for secure remote access. The shared facility enabled up to 2,200 staff to use these machines if approved to do so.

2004-05

1,550 Laptops were in use for secure remote access. The shared facility enabled 2,550 staff to use these machines if approved to do so.

2005-06

1,550 Laptops were in use at the start of the year but this reduced to 1,200 by end-March 2006, as a consequence of the efficiency programme and reduction in staff numbers. A corresponding reduction in shared usage was applicable.

Ministerial Visits

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry on how many occasions he has visited each region in an official capacity in the last 12 months. (84009)

The Secretary of State for Trade and Industry has visited the North West twice and the North East, South East and East Midlands once.

Nuclear Energy

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry pursuant to paragraph 5.134 of the Energy Review, Cm 6887, whether the Environment Agency will be able to recover (a) in full and (b) in part from any company putting forward proposals to build new nuclear plants the costs of the pre-licensing work. (86082)

Paragraph 5.9 of the Environment Agency submission to the Energy Review stated that:

“We will need to recover the costs associated with pre-authorisation/licensing assessments. There are legal provisions in the EA 95 to enable our costs to be recovered.”

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry whether it is his policy to replace those nuclear stations that he identifies in the Energy Review as coming to the end of their operational lives. (86114)

Any new power stations would be proposed, developed, constructed and operated by the private sector. It is for the private sector to make judgements on the future relative costs of different generating technologies, within the market framework established by Government. Developers will make their proposals for new generating capacity based on these judgments.

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what estimate his Department has made of the level of government subsidies likely to be required to stimulate the commissioning of new nuclear generating stations by energy companies. (85568)

It will be for the private sector to initiate, fund, construct and operate any new nuclear power station, and also meet full decommissioning costs and their full share of long term waste management costs.

Nuclear Materials (Transportation)

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry whether vessels transporting nuclear material are escorted by the Royal Navy. (84866)

[holding answer 13 July 2006]: All shipments of civil nuclear material on a UK flagged vessel are carried out in accordance with the Nuclear Industries Security Regulations (NISR) 2003 which are administered and enforced by the Government's independent security regulator, the Office for Civil Nuclear Security (OCNS). Before any shipment can commence, OCNS must be satisfied that the overall security measures are adequately robust to prevent the theft or sabotage of the material being transported.

British flagged transport vessels carrying nuclear material are not routinely escorted by the Royal Navy, but, where appropriate, prior coordination with the Royal Navy will be an important factor in the assessment of a Transport Security Plan. The ships will carry an escort unit of the Civil Nuclear Constabulary's (CNC) Marine Escort Group, which provides armed security for nuclear materials in transit. The Marine Escort Group has been specially trained to a high standard by the Royal Navy.

Offshore Transmission Regime

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry pursuant to paragraph 5.57 of the Energy Review, what the scope is of the work being conducted on developing an offshore transmission regime; and if he will make a statement. (85723)

[holding answer 17 July 2006]: Following my announcement on 30 March 2006 that the Government had decided to extend the regulated price control model to offshore transmission, DTI and Ofgem are working with industry to develop that new regime.

Ofgem issued a scoping document setting out the main issues that need to be considered on 3 April 2006. The document can be found at:

http://www.ofgem.gov.uk/temp/ofgem/cache/cmsattach/14533_6006.pdf

Further information about the project to deliver the new regime including project structure, governance and timetable can be found at:

http://www.dti.gov.uk/energy/sources/renewables/policy/offshore-transmission/page28604.html

and

http://www.dti.gov.uk/energy/sources/renewables/policy/offshore-transmission/offshore-transmission-experts-group/page28711.html

Post Office Closures

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry if he will make a statement on the closure of the Shrewsbury post office. (85484)

I understand that the directly managed office in Shrewsbury is to be relocated to premises 50 yards away under a franchising agreement and customers will benefit from extended opening hours and have access to the same full range of services. Decisions on individual offices are an operational matter for Post Office Ltd. The 500 directly managed post offices made combined annual losses of some £50 million in 2005-06 and Post Office Ltd are seeking more cost-effective ways of providing main post office services to the public.

Recruitment

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry how much (a) his Department and (b) its agencies spent on recruitment, search and selection agencies in each of the last five years. (68337)

Expenditure on recruitment for the past three financial years has been extracted from the Department’s finance system. Information for the other years requested is not readily available on a consistent basis and would be available only at disproportionate cost.

The following table shows the breakdown on recruitment, search and selection agencies by DTI and its agencies.

Financial year

Expenditure on recruitment, search and selection agencies (£000)

2003-04

1,427

2004-05

784

2005-06

1,009

Renewable Energy

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what assessment he has made when benchmarking UK performance of the proportion of (a) energy and (b) electricity in other EU countries which is supplied from renewable sources. (84956)

According to data published by Eurostat in 2004 the United Kingdom ranked 17th of the 25 member states of the EU in terms of the share of electricity from renewable energy to gross electricity consumption. In 1995 the UK ranked 19th and if all countries meet their 2010 targets the UK will move up to 15th. It should be noted that the countries that rank highest (Austria, Latvia and Sweden) have significant and well developed hydro resources and plentiful supplies of biomass (mainly wood).

The International Energy Agency (IEA) produces statistics that exclude hydro generation from the renewables share of electricity production, but this is available for only 19 of the 25 EU member states that are also IEA members. On this basis the UK ranked 13th out of 19 in the latest available year (2003) with Denmark the highest ranking because of its well-developed wind power sector.

The IEA also produces statistics on the contribution of renewable sources to total primary energy supply for the 19 EU member states. Here the UK ranked 17th out of 19 in 2003.

The spring 2006 edition of the “Ernst and Young Renewable Energy Country Attractiveness Indices”, which provide scores for national renewable energy markets, support mechanisms, renewable energy infrastructures and their suitability for individual technologies, placed the UK fifth most attractive in the world (third in Europe) of all countries http://www.ey.com/global/content.nsif/International/ECU_Library

The UK has a target that by 2010, 10 per cent. of all UK electricity produced will come from renewable sources. It was recently announced in the Energy Review (2006) that, in order to further boost investors’ confidence, the Renewables Obligation would be extended to 20 per cent.

Restriction of Hazardous Substances

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what representations he has received on the Restriction of Hazardous Substances regulations from small business and sole traders; and if he will make a statement. (85583)

The DTI consulted on the Restriction of Hazardous Substances Directive on three separate occasions before the regulations were laid before Parliament. On each occasion we received representations from a wide range of stakeholders including small businesses, sole traders and trade bodies representing these interests.

Russia

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry (1) how much gas his Department estimates the UK will import from Russia in (a) 2006, (b) 2010 and (c) 2020, (i) as a percentage of total consumption and (ii) in cubic metres; and what percentage of that gas his Department estimates will be (A) produced by Gazprom and (B) transported through Gazprom's pipeline network; (85082)

(2) what assessment his Department has made of the impact on the security of gas supply to the UK of the law passed by the Russian State Duma on Gazprom's control of gas exports from Russia;

(3) what his assessment is of the impact on UK businesses of the proposed amendments to Russia's Subsoil Law on foreign participation in Russian oil and gas projects;

(4) what his assessment is of the impact on security of energy supplies to the UK of the Russian Federation's (a) level of compliance with the provisions of the Energy Charter Treaty and (b) policy on the Transit Protocol to the Energy Charter Treaty;

(5) what assessment his Department has made of the impact on UK investments in Russia of the Russian Federation's level of compliance with the Energy Charter Treaty;

(6) what plans he has to make representations to his Russian counterpart about the proposed amendments to Russia's Subsoil Law on foreign participation in Russian oil and gas projects.

The UK's gas import dependence is set to rise to 80-90 per cent. by 2020, of which a significant proportion is expected to be imported from the European mainland through existing and planned interconnection capacity. The International Energy Agency forecast that the EU will import 25 per cent. of its gas needs from Russia by 2030. It is, therefore, possible that some Russian gas will be imported into the UK, albeit indirectly and commingled with gas from other sources (such as Norway, the Netherlands and LNG from outside Europe) as part of the European gas system.

The contractual origin of imports into the UK is a decision for companies operating in the UK's liberalised gas market, taking into account elements such as cost, reliability, availability and the need for a diverse range of sources to provide security of supply. Given that there is no direct physical interconnection capacity with Russia and contractual flows do not necessarily follow physical flows, estimates of the type requested are not made.

Given that the UK does not import directly from Russia, any impact on the UK from Russia's legislation or compliance with international agreements such as the Energy Charter Treaty will be felt most directly through its effect on European markets. As such, the UK will continue to press for open, competitive and liberalised European energy markets.

In the short term, we expect the Russian gas export laws to have very little real effect on European security of supply, as Gazprom's already holds a defacto monopoly on exports by virtue of their network ownership. Longer-term effects are unclear; however, should gas transit through Russia become too commercially unattractive, Caspian and Central Asian producers will begin to seek alternative supply routes for their products to European and global markets.

The proposed legislative changes surrounding Russia's subsoil law continue to be subject to discussion in the Russian government. The DTI and FCO are in contact with UK businesses involved in the Russian Energy market, in order to remain updated on the impact that any final series of laws may have.

The UK, with other EU member states, will continue to encourage Russia to liberalise its domestic markets and provide fair and open access to its resources and pipelines in order to foster further competition in energy supplies into Europe and to ensure best use is made of its finite resources.

The UK, with other G7 members, has encouraged Russia to move forward during its G8 presidency and ratify the Energy Charter Treaty, of which it is already a signatory and applies on a provisional basis. We would envisage that these Global Energy Security discussions will continue during the Russian presidency of the G8.

Russia has called for the negotiations on the Transit Protocol to be completed before it can ratify the full Treaty. Through the EU, we continue to work with Russia towards an agreed text for the Transit Protocol while at the same time emphasising to Russia the importance of open, transparent, efficient and competitive markets at all stages of the energy supply chain as the key to global energy security..

Whilst the absence of ratification may bring some uncertainty to the rights of both foreign and domestic investors, it is important to note that the UK has a separate bi- lateral investment Treaty with Russia that protects the investment of UK firms.

Sir Alistair Graham

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry when Sir Alistair Graham was appointed to the Independent Committee for the Supervision of Standards of the Telephone Information Services; when he took up his position; and what his rate of remuneration is. (85541)

Sir Alistair Graham was appointed as Chairman of ICSTIS on 2 February 2006. Sir Alistair took up his appointment on 1 June 2006 and he receives an annual salary of £45,000.

Small Change Big Difference

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what steps his Department and its agencies have taken following the launch of the Government's Small Change Big Difference Campaign. (72015)

None specifically. The Department already promotes healthier lifestyles by providing its employees with gym facilities; healthier eating choices and fresh fruit are always available in the staff canteen.

Staff Development

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what the total cost was of (a) staff away days and (b) staff team building exercises in his Department in each of the last three years. (69005)

Uranium

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what analysis his Department has undertaken of the security and sustainability of the UK's supply of uranium for civil use. (85462)

In addition to responses to the Energy Consultation the Department analysed the following:

OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, “Uranium 2005—Resources, Production and Demand”. OECD Publications, Paris, June 2006.

OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, “Uranium 2003—Resources, Production and Demand”. OECD Publications, Paris, July 2004.

Sustainable Development Commission, “The role of nuclear power in a low carbon economy—Paper 8: Uranium Resource Availability”. March 2006.

Morgan Stanley, Supply/Demand Outlook: Uranium Oxide—Inventory Cycle Coming to an End, “Basic Materials: Global Insights”. December 15, 2004, pp 47-52

Morgan Stanley, Uranium Oxide—Gaining Momentum on a Forecast Supply Deficit, “Metals & Mining: Global Insights”—April 6, 2005 pp 16-19

TradeTech, LLC's Uranium Information web site: http://www.uranium.info/ind.ex.html

World Nuclear Association, Resources and Uranium Market: http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/info.htm#resourcesumarket

Welsh Energy Policy

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry which aspects of energy policy in Wales are (a) devolved to the Welsh Assembly Government and (b) reserved matters for the United Kingdom Government. (86423)

In energy policy the Welsh Assembly Government are responsible for the areas of fuel poverty, energy efficiency and some aspects of planning.

The Energy Review document, “The Energy Challenge” provides detail about which areas of planning are devolved, and which are reserved.

This information can be found on pages 138-141 of the above document, which can be accessed on the DTI website: www.dti.gov.uk/energy/review.

FIFA World Cup

To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry how many complimentary tickets his Department has received for games taking place at the FIFA World Cup 2006 in Germany. (63907)

We have not been notified of any employees receiving complimentary tickets for World Cup matches that took place in Germany this summer.

Communities and Local Government

Local Government Projects

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how much funding her Department provided to 4ps in each of the last five years; and how much funding has been allocated for 2006-07. (86252)

The Government paid the following amounts of Revenue Support Grant to the Public Private Partnerships Programme:

£

2001-02

1,109,000

2002-03

1,250,000

2003-04

2,875,000

2004-05

2,947,000

2005-06

3,947,000

2006-07

4,447,000

In addition, the Department's predecessors paid the 4ps the sum of £80,250 for the development of a procurement pack for Joint Service Centre PFI projects, of which £35,250 was paid in 2002-03 and £55,000 in 2003-04.

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what role 4ps has in the decision-making process during procurement; and if she will make a statement. (86253)

Subject to their legal duties, including the duty of best value and public procurement law, local authorities are responsible for taking their own decisions on procurement. In conjunction with other change agents, such as the regional centres of excellence, 4ps offers support to local authorities, including through the national efficiency and strategic procurement skills programme.

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what guidance her Department has issued to 4ps about its responsibilities under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 to make available, on request, its reports on projects which it has considered. (86254)

4ps is an independent company owned by the Local Government Association. The Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG), alongside other bodies, provides 4ps with funding to meet the capacity building needs of local authorities. DCLG has not issued guidance to 4ps on its responsibilities under the Freedom of Information Act 2000.

Consultation Papers

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government to what extent her Department stores responses to consultation papers (a) electronically and (b) solely in hard copy. (85707)

Where responses to consultation papers are received electronically, they are stored in that format, but they are made available in hardcopy where requested. Where responses are received as hardcopy we do not normally convert to electronic format, although the need to do so may be considered on a case by case basis.

The Department for Communities and Local Government welcomes consultation responses in any format as consultation is a key part of the policy making process. All public consultations are subject to the Consultation Code of Practice.

Council Tax

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what estimate the Government has made of the proportion of an average Band D council tax bill in England that funds (a) domestic waste collections and (b) domestic waste disposal. (85714)

It is not possible to say how much of council tax income can be attributed to pay for any particular service. This is because it is not possible to say whether any item of revenue expenditure is funded from council tax or from the government grants and business rates that also finance revenue expenditure.

Domestic waste collection and disposal costs for local authorities in England in 2004-05 are estimated at £1.3 billion and £1.4 billion respectively. This is 1.4 per cent. and 1.5 per cent. respectively of net current expenditure by local authorities in England.

Source:

2004-05 Revenue Outturn (RO) forms

Departmental Website

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what internet domain names her Department owns; and for what purpose they were purchased. (83102)

The following domain names are owned by DCLG:

Domain name

Purpose

bmespark.com

Black Minority Ethnic Supporting people web site

bmespark.co.uk

Alias of bmespark.com

bmespark.org.uk

Alias of bmespark.com

bvpi.gov.uk

Best value performance indicators website

cleanersafergreener.gov.uk

Best practice website on building cleaner safer greener communities

communities.gov.uk

Corporate DCLG web presence

community-fire-safety.co.uk

Alias of firekills.gov.uk

community-fire-safety.org.uk

Alias of firekills.gov.uk

dclg.gov.uk

Alternative corporate website address—redirects to communities.gov.uk

fire.gov.uk

Fire gateway website

firekills.gov.uk

Fire safety website

firekills.co.uk

Alias of firekills.gov.uk

fire-kills.co.uk

Alias of firekills.gov.uk

firelink.org.uk

National Wide Area Radio system for the fire and rescue service website

firesafetytoolbox.org.uk

Fire safety campaigning material for fire service

firesafetytoolbox.co.uk

Alias of firesafetytoolbox.co.uk

futureleadership.gov.uk

Management development programme for local authorities

getfirewise.com

Children’s fire safety guidance

getfirewise.co.uk

Alias of getfirewise.com

getfirewise.gov.uk

Alias of getfirewise.com

homeinformationpack.gov.uk

Website providing details of new home information packs

homeinformationpacks.gov.uk

Alias of homeinformationpack.gov.uk

iggi.gov.uk

Intra Governmental Group on Geographic Information website

info4local.gov.uk

Provides local authorities with quick and easy access to information from central Government

irfs.org.uk

Independent review of the fire service website—now defunct

localegov.gov.uk

Local egovernment programme website

local-egov.gov.uk

Alias of localegov.gov.uk

mapsontap.gov.uk

Information and mapping service for government

mycouncil.gov.uk

Directs public to direct.gov.uk/mycouncil

neighbourhood.gov.uk

Neighbourhood renewal unit website

neighbourhoods.gov.uk

Alias of neighbourhood.gov.uk

neighbourhoodrenewal.gov.uk

Alias of neighbourhood.gov.uk

nlud.org

National Land use database website

odpm.gov.uk

Former corporate web presence—redirects to communities.gov.uk

planningportal.gov.uk

Online planning and building regulations resource

propertylicense.gov.uk

Alias of propertylicence.gov.uk

propertylicence.gov.uk

Direct public to information on mandatory licensing for landlords of homes in multiple occupation

renewal.net

Neighbourhood renewal guidance website

spdirectory.org.uk

Supporting People Programme Directory of Services

spkweb.org.uk

Supporting People programme for vulnerable people—website

togetherwecan.info

Together we can campaign website

womenandequality.gov.uk

Women and equality unit website

Departmental Websites

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what websites come under her Department’s responsibility; and what the (a) cost and (b) number of visitors to those sites were in 2005-06. (83099)

I refer the hon. Lady to the answer given to the hon. Member for Wealden (Charles Hendry) on 4 July 2006, Official Report, column 958W for the list of websites under the Department’s responsibility and the cost of those sites. Visitor figures are shown as follows for DCLG sites April 2005-March 2006. DCLG websites are hosted on a number of platforms with different methodologies for evaluating usage. I have listed those sites for which visitor figures are available. Where estimated, figures are based on averages or projections of available data where hosting arrangements changed during the year.

Visitor figures

Main corporate site (odpm.gov.uk and subdomains)

12,271,208

Planning portal (planningportal.gov.uk)

834,432

Renewal net (renewal.net)

752,190

Women and equality unit (womenandequality.gov.uk)

1272,400

Info4local (info4local.gov.uk)

246,500

Neighbourhood renewal unit (neighbourhood.gov.uk)

164,137

Supporting people (spkweb.org.uk)

137,579

Fire Kills (www.firekills.gov.uk)

316,813

Other DCLG sites for which statistics are available

246,714

1 Estimated

Employment Opportunities (Ethnic Minorities)

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what steps are being taken to promote opportunities for (a) women and (b) men of ethnic minority origin to gain employment in (i) Coventry, South and (ii) the West Midlands. (83418)

I have been asked to reply.

We are committed to helping all those who may be disadvantaged in the labour market. Specifically, we have a public service agreement target to

‘Increase the employment rate of ethnic minorities and significantly reduce the difference between the overall employment rate and that of ethnic minorities’.

Support for people from ethnic minorities is provided locally through Jobcentre Plus, which offers employment services to all people of working age. For those furthest from the labour market and who are not using Jobcentre Plus services, our Ethnic Minority Outreach programme also offers the opportunity for people to find and keep work. Since its introduction Ethnic Minority Outreach has achieved over 10,000 successful job outcomes.

On 11 July we announced the launch of a new independent body to help ethnic minorities find work. The Ethnic Minority Advisory Group, which is made up of 22 representatives from across the ethnic community, has been set up as part of the Government’s welfare reform agenda to boost employment opportunities for ethnic minorities.

The new advisory group will be a way of getting to the heart of the community and finding out the best ways to close the employment gap. To do this, we will work in partnership, focussing on what will work for local communities.

Housing Act

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government when she next plans to discuss the operation of section 21 (4a) of the Housing Act 1988 with local authority representatives. (82709)

My Department has never received any requests from local authorities or their representative bodies to discuss with them section 21 (4a) of the Housing Act 1988. This is the section that allows private landlords, by giving two months notice, to regain possession of their property following the end of a contracted fixed term or during a periodic tenancy provided it is six months after the start of the original tenancy.

Swindon Council

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the meetings held by officials from her Department with Swindon borough council in 2004 and 2005 to improve the performance of the councillors running Swindon borough council. (86001)

[holding answer 17 July 2006]: Meetings between officials from the then ODPM and Swindon borough council during 2004 and 2005 were intended to encourage a sustained focus by the Council on overall improvement of its performance. By December 2005, Swindon had improved from a Comprehensive Performance Assessment rating of “poor” to achieve a rating of two stars and “improving well”. In the light of this improved performance, ODPM’s close engagement with Swindon borough council ceased in early 2006 as it was considered to have achieved its objectives. Swindon continues to receive support, where necessary, from the Government Office for the South West.

Education and Skills

Autism

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what guidance is given to local authorities to assist them in developing best practice on the disabled children’s module of the National Service Framework 2004 when identifying autistic spectrum disorder; and if he will make a statement. (85008)

Standard 8 of the National Service Framework (NSF) for Children, Young People and Maternity Services, targeted at local authorities and others, is for disabled children and young people and those with complex health needs. Children and young people receive co-ordinated, high-quality child and family-centred services that are based on assessed needs, promote social inclusion and, where possible, enable them and their families to live ordinary lives.

The NSF has been supported by a number of exemplars, including one on autism. This sets out an optimal pathway for a boy with autism, beginning at the age of three, from initial concern and contact with primary care, through a developmental and a multi-agency assessment, the drawing up of a family support plan and early educational intervention and on to the transitions between primary and secondary school and secondary school and adult life.

Local authorities have a duty under the Education Act 1996, where necessary, to identify, assess and make suitable provision for children with special educational needs (SEN), including those with autistic spectrum disorders. When doing so, local authorities have to have regard to the SEN Code of Practice. “Autistic Spectrum Disorders: Good Practice Guidance” (2002, Department for Education and Skills and Department of Health) is also available for local authorities. It includes pointers to good practice on identification.

Buddhism

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills pursuant to his Department's list of organisations consulted on religious issues affecting matters concerning his Department, what assessment he has made of the extent to which the Network of Buddhist Organisations is representative of that faith's adherents; and if he will make a statement. (86280)

The DfES has made no such assessment. The Network of Buddhist Organisations is one of the organisations that the Department consults on relevant issues.

Bullying

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what the incidence of bullying in schools was in each of the last three years. (86419)

We are unable to provide this information as we do not collect these data centrally. However, in our anti-bullying guidance, we encourage all schools to record incidents of bullying and there is a requirement to record all racist incidents.

CAFCASS

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills (1) how many private law cases were completed by CAFCASS in (a) 2004-05 and (b) 2005-06; (83252)

(2) what the average yearly work load was for a guardian ad litem in each of the last five years.

These are matters for the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service, CAFCASS. Anthony Douglas, the chief executive, has written to the hon. Member with this information and a copy of his reply has been placed in the House Library.

Letter from Anthony Douglas, dated 14 July 2006:

Parliamentary Questions Concerning CAFCASS

I am writing to you in response to the two parliamentary questions that you tabled recently.

PQ83252—how many private law cases were completed by CAFCASS in (a) 2004-05 and (b) 2005-06.

Private law reports completed by CAFCASS were as follows:

Number

2004-05

29,761

2005-06

25,290

PQ83256— what was the average yearly workload for a Guardian ad Litem in each of the last five years.

CAFCASS practitioners cover public and private law cases. Some other work, such as adoption cases, can be the subject of either a public or a private law case.

Based on previous years calculations, the average workload for each individual practitioner at any one time is as follows:

Number

Care (public)

10

8

6

4

0

Other non-care (private)

0

6

13

20

26

The duration for each care case (from application to final order) will affect the number at any one time. For the purpose of this comparison, a care case is assumed to take 52 weeks. The Public Law Judicial Protocol aims to see all cases completed within 40 weeks, and this target will be supported by the recommendations of the recent review of Care Proceedings, once implemented.

Average workloads in CAFCASS are changing considerably due to changes in working practices underway, such as the rapid rise in the amount of practitioner time going into dispute resolution work in private law cases. Other reforms, such as writing shorter more analytical reports, also aim to increase productivity and the number of cases a practitioner can deal with at any one time within a reasonable caseload.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills (1) what staff redundancies in the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service are projected during 2006-07; (83057)

(2) what savings the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service will be making during 2006-07; and what assessment has been made of the impact of these savings.

[holding answer 6 July 2006]: These are matters for the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service, CAFCASS. Anthony Douglas, the Chief Executive, has written to the hon. Member with this information and a copy of his reply has been placed in the House Library.

Letter from Anthony Douglas, dated 14 July 2006:

I am writing to you in response to the two parliamentary questions that you tabled recently.

PQ83057—what staff redundancies in CAFCASS are projected during the current financial year.

CAFCASS has no plans for redundancies in the current financial year. I anticipate that savings targets can be achieved through increased productivity and efficiency savings.

PQ83058—what savings CAFCASS will be making during the current financial year; and whether there has been an assessment of the impact of these savings.

CAFCASS’s budget in the current financial year has the same baseline as last year. Savings of £4.5 million will need to be made to balance the budget. We have received an extra £4.7 million funding from DfES for this financial year only, to help with our change programmes. This will help us to develop our IT systems, to roll out our new case management information system across all our offices, and to reform our working practices where this is needed. The bulk of savings will be made through efficiency measures, such as procurement savings and more efficient working of cases.

The impact of savings targets and measures is being kept under constant review, both at Board and Executive level.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills (1) what plans he has to upgrade IT systems within the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service in 2006-07; (83403)

(2) what plans he has for the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service training budget for 2006-07;

(3) what the average time taken to complete a Section 7 report in private law was in the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service in the latest period for which figures are available;

(4) how many cases are on the waiting list in public law in the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service, broken down by region;

(5) what average length of time was taken to complete a Section 7 case with private law in the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service in each of the last 12 months.

[holding answer 10 July 2006]: These are matters for the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service, CAFCASS. Anthony Douglas, the Chief Executive, has written to the hon. Member with this information and a copy of his reply has been placed in the House Library.

Letter from Anthony Douglas, dated 14 July 2006:

Parliamentary Questions Concerning CAFCASS

I am writing to you in response to the five parliamentary questions that you tabled recently.

PQ83403—what plans he has to upgrade IT systems within the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service in 2006-07.

During 2006/07 CAFCASS will be upgrading its IT network and moving to a more up to date Internet Protocol Over Virtual Private Network system which will improve functionality and allow for further development across a range of IT-enabled initiatives. This will support the roll out of our new Case Recording System, document management systems and will support mobile/flexible working. This is a major development programme with a detailed implementation plan. Completion of all programmes is expected by April 2007.

PQ83404—what plans he has to freeze the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service training budget for 2006-07.

An additional £500,000 has been put into the CAFCASS training budget in 2006-07, thereby increasing spend on training to £1.22 million. This does not include staff time, which is an additional support at both the national and regional levels.

PQ83405—what the average time taken to complete a Section 7 report in private law was in the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service in the latest period for which figures are available.

This figure is not kept as a statistic or performance indicator. The notional average for purposes of workload calculation is 25 hours, though with the complexity of cases increasing, this is likely to be an underestimate. A great number of cases that were once the subject of s7 reports are now dealt with earlier and quicker in our dispute resolution programmes. This in turn means the fewer cases subject to s7 reports are those much harder to resolve, and consequently, they take longer. In practice, the variation in cases is large, between 20 hours at the lower end and over 100 hours for the hardest cases.

PQ83521—how many cases are on the waiting list in public law in the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service, broken down by region.

Our latest figure for this, at the end of May 2006, was as follows:

CAFCASS Public Law Unallocated Cases Snapshot, End May 2006

Region

Public Law Unallocated Cases

Total Workload

Percentage of Total Workload

East Midlands

0

621

0.0

Eastern

30

962

3.1

Greater London

89

2,358

3.6

North East

32

663

4.8

North West

21

1,444

1.5

South East

42

838

5.0

South West

6

989

0.6

Southern

6

868

0.7

West Midlands

37

1,289

2.9

Yorkshire and Humberside

11

1,301

0.8

National Total

274

11,333

2.4

Our Key Performance Indicator for this is that no more than 3% of public law cases should be unallocated at month end.

PQ83522—what average length of time was taken to complete a Section 7 case with private law in the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service in each of the last 12 months.

In respect of cases received and completed during the period 1 January 2006 to 31 May 2006, the average duration of a s7 Report (working days) by regions was as follows:

Region

Number of Days

East Midlands

75

Eastern

65

North East

63

North West

45

South East

68

South West

58

Southern

90

West Midlands

71

Yorkshire

64

Giving a National Average of 63 days.

We do not keep statistics of how many weeks or months these days represent. Cases vary in the length they take for a range of reasons, such as their complexity, and the requirements of all the other cases an individual practitioner holds on their caseload at any given time.

Child Care

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what the total cost of the Child Care Affordability Programme (CCAP) has been in each year of its existence; and what estimate he has made of the cost of the introduction of the CCAP to all other local authorities. (85795)

[holding answer 17 July 2006]: The Childcare Affordability Programme launched in November 2005 is jointly funded by the London Development Agency (£22 million over 2005-08) and the DfES (£11 million over 2006-08). The DfES contribution is £5 million for 2006-07 and £6 million for 2007-08. DfES is also funding the evaluation of the Programme at a cost of £300,000.

It is too early in the Programme to consider its extension to other local authorities.

Disability Awareness

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what provision is made within the school curriculum for awareness of physical, medical and mental disabilities; and if he will make a statement. (86346)

There are many opportunities in the school curriculum for raising awareness of physical, medical and mental disabilities. Through the non-statutory Personal, Social and Health Education framework and statutory National Curriculum Citizenship Education, pupils are taught that differences and similarities between people arise from a number of factors, including disability, and about the need for mutual respect and understanding. Pupils are encouraged to reflect on spiritual, moral, social, and cultural issues, using imagination to understand other people’s experiences. They are taught about the causes, symptoms and treatments for stress and depression, and to identify strategies for prevention and management and how to seek professional advice confidently and find information about health. National Curriculum Science also examines how human health is affected by a range of environmental and inherited factors.

Examiners

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many people are employed as (a) GCSE and (b) A-level examiners in England. (86432)

No central database is kept of examiner numbers. However, the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) estimates that the three English-based unitary awarding bodies (AQA, OCR and Edexcel) contracted approximately 56,000 people as examiners and moderators for GCSEs, A-levels and related qualifications in 2005/06.

GCSEs

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what proportion of students achieved five or more GCSEs grade A*-C in rural comprehensive secondary schools of (a) fewer than 100 students, (b) 100-199 students, (c) 200-299 students, (d) 300-399 students, (e) 400-499 students, (f) 500-599 students, (g) 600-700 students and (h) over 700 students in the last year for which figures are available; and if he will make a statement. (85972)

The information requested can be found in the following table:

GCSE and equivalent achievement of pupils1 at the end of Key Stage 4 by the end of 2004/052 in comprehensive schools3, by size of school

Total number of pupils in school

Number of pupils at end of Key Stage 4

Number of pupils at end of Key Stage 4 achieving 5+ A*-C at GCSE or equivalent

Percentage of pupils at end of Key Stage 4 achieving 5+ A*-C at GCSE or equivalent

(a) <100

9

2

22.2

(b) 100-199

319

155

48.6

(c) 200-299

474

233

49.2

(d) 300-399

1,493

539

36.1

(e) 400-499

5,599

2,398

42.8

(f) 500-599

14,043

6,621

47.1

(g) 600-699

20,568

10,323

50.2

(h) >=700

480,379

265,650

55.3

1 Number of pupils on roll at the end of Key Stage 4 in the 2004/05 academic year. 2 Includes achievements by these pupils in previous academic years. 3 Including City Technology Colleges and Academies.

Pupils' Travel

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what average distance a pupil travels to school in (a) rural and (b) non-rural areas; what steps the Government have taken to lower the cost of travel to school for students in rural areas; and if he will make a statement. (85943)

The Department does not routinely collect information on the average distance pupils travel to school, and an answer to this question could be provided only at disproportionate cost. However, data derived from pupil level annual school census returns in 2005 showed the following pattern in secondary schools by region1.

1 Source PLASC 2005. Includes pupils aged five to 15 attending maintained secondary schools (excluding middle deemed), CTCs and academies. Distances are measured on a straight line basis.

Region

Distance (Miles)

North East

1.53

North West

1.60

Yorkshire and Humberside

1.69

East Midlands

1.99

West Midlands

1.64

East of England

2.14

London

1.55

South East

2.13

South West

2.17

England

1.83

The Education and Inspections Bill includes provisions that extend entitlement to free home to school transport for low-income families, and will enable a small number of local authorities to propose pathfinder schemes to test innovative arrangements supporting choice, and increasing the proportion of pupils travelling by sustainable means.

SATS

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what guidance his Department offers schools on (a) the allocation of extra time for certain pupils in the SATS testing regime and (b) the criteria which should be applied in such cases; how the allocation of extra time across the country is monitored and assessed; and if he will make a statement. (86273)

Additional time is among the access arrangements available in the National Curriculum tests to enable children to take those tests on an equal footing. The circumstances in which pupils may be allowed additional time are set out in the “Assessment and reporting arrangements” booklets published by the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority. These are sent to schools in October each year and are available from the website www.naa.org.uk/tests. The arrangements are monitored through the requests for permission for allowing additional time made by schools to local authorities and the National Assessment Agency, and in the routine monitoring of test administration undertaken by local authorities and the National Assessment Agency.

School Premises

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what the total area of land was taken up by school premises in England in each year since 1996. (86434)

Data on areas of school sites were supplied to my Department by local education authorities in 2001 and 2003. However, the completeness and quality of the data is not good enough to accurately assess the total area of land taken up by school premises.

Science and Engineering Graduate Scheme

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many international students participated in the Science and Engineering Graduate Scheme in 2005; and what estimate he has made of the number of international students who will participate in the scheme in 2006. (83158)

I have been asked to reply.

2,889 international students participated in the Science and Engineering Graduate Scheme in 2005.

Between 1 January 2006 and 30 June 2006 a total of 2,000 international students participated in the Science and Engineering Graduate Scheme. On that basis it is estimated that this figure will rise to over 4,000 before the end of 2006.

This information has not been quality assured, and is not a National Statistic. It should be treated as provisional management information and may be subject to change.

Student Funding

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what the average amount of funding per student is in comprehensive secondary schools of (a) fewer than 100, (b) 100-199, (c) 200-299, (d) 300-399, (e) 400-499, (f) 500-599, (g) 600-700 and (h) over 700 students in (i) rural areas and (ii) non-rural areas in 2006-07; and if he will make a statement. (85948)

The available information is contained within the following table:

Comprehensive secondary budgeted expenditure1 per pupil2 in urban and rural schools3 by school size in England during the 2006-07 financial year.

Size of school

3Urban schools

3Rural schools

(a) less than 100 pupils

4,790

(b) 100 up to, but not including, 200

4,700

6,340

(c) 200 up to, but not including, 300

5,580

5,830

(d) 300 up to, but not including, 400

5,150

4,320

(e) 400 up to, but not including, 500

4,990

4,220

(f) 500 up to, but not including, 600

4,790

3,990

(g) 600 up to, but not including, 700

4,590

3,810

(h) 700 and above

4,120

3,830

All school sizes

4,170

3,850

1 Budgeted expenditure includes total budget share plus Schools Standards Grant, School Development Grant, Other Standards Fund Allocation, Devolved School Means grant, Threshold and performance pay and Support for schools in financial difficulty. This excludes the central cost of support services such as home to school transport, local authority administration and the financing of capital expenditure. This is drawn from the 2006-07 Section 52 Budget Statement (Table 2). Schools that are proposed to close according to Edubase (the DfES database of educational establishments) in the 2006-07 financial year have been excluded.

2 Pupil numbers are taken from Table 2 of Section 52 Budget, FTE Pupils (including LSC pupils).

3 The urban/rural classification is drawn from the Edubase.

4 No schools.

Notes:

1. Figures are rounded to the nearest 10. Cash terms figures as reported by local authorities as at 13 July 2006.

2. Data remain provisional and are subject to change by local authorities.

Teachers

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what assessment his Department has made of the availability of trained specialist school teachers in (a) English, (b) mathematics, (c) science, (d) modern languages and (e) information and communication technology in rural areas; and if he will make a statement. (84746)

The information is not available in the format requested.

The following tables provide the information available on the recruitment, training and teachers in service by subject specialism. This information is not available for rural areas only.

Table 1 provides the number of students recruited to initial teacher training courses by phase and subject for academic years 2001/02 to 2005/06.

Table 1: Recruitment to initial teacher training courses1, 2—Academic years 2000/01 to 2005/06 by phase and subject specialism, England

2000-01

2001-02

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

Percentage increase 2004/05 to 2005/06

Actual

Places

% difference +/-

Primary and secondary

Undergraduate

8,100

7,830

7,790

7,850

8,250

8,170

-1

Postgraduate

19,620

21,260

23,370

25,780

25,860

25,250

-2

Of which:

School centred/ other non-HEI

1,060

1,190

1,420

1,540

1,720

1,740

1

Total

27,720

29,090

31,160

33,630

34,110

33,410

34,300

-3

-2

Fast Track3

n/a

110

120

300

400

420

Grand total

27,720

29,190

31,280

33,930

34,520

33,830

Primary

Undergraduate

6,580

6,390

6,490

6,600

7,030

6,960

-1

Postgraduate

6,590

6,720

8,000

8,980

9,420

9,060

-4

Of which:

School centred/ other non-HEI

510

590

740

810

890

910

2

Total

13,170

13,110

14,490

15,580

16,450

16,020

15,800

1

-3

Fast Track3

n/a

30

30

60

90

90

Grand total

13,170

13,140

14,520

15,640

16,540

16,110

Secondary

Undergraduate

1,520

1,440

1,300

1,260

1,220

1,210

-1

Postgraduate

13,020

14,530

15,370

16,790

16,440

16,190

-2

Of which:

School centred/ other non-HEI

550

600

680

730

830

840

0

Total

14,540

15,980

16,670

18,050

17,670

17,390

18,500

-6

-2

Fast Track3

n/a

80

90

240

310

320

Grand total

14,540

16,060

16,760

18,290

17,980

17,720

Secondary by subject

Mathematics

1,290

1,550

1,670

1,940

2,030

2,010

2,350

-14

-1

English (inc. drama)

2,030

2,220

2,480

2,420

2,380

2,110

2,200

-4

-11

Science

2,410

2,590

2,700

2,870

2,830

2,930

3,225

-9

4

Modern foreign languages

1,640

1,710

1,730

1,820

1,620

1,560

1,900

-18

-4

Technology4

1,860

2,160

2,400

2,670

2,610

2,570

2,890

-11

-2

History

910

920

990

1,000

910

850

810

5

-7

Geography

900

1,030

950

990

900

820

925

-12

-10

Physical education

1,210

1,330

1,330

1,590

1,530

1,530

1,450

6

0

Art

850

840

890

930

860

780

800

-3

-10

Music

560

650

600

620

600

650

690

-5

8

Religious education

570

590

580

590

630

670

730

-8

7

Citizenship5

0

150

190

220

240

230

240

-5

-3

Other6

320

230

170

230

250

360

290

26

46

Vocational subjects7

n/a

n/a

n/a

160

280

330

18

Total

14,540

15,980

16,670

18,050

17,670

17,390

18,500

-6

-2

Fast Track3

n/a

80

90

240

310

320

Grand total

14,540

16,060

16,760

18,290

17,980

17,720

n/a = not available.

1 Recruitment figures for 2005/06 are provisional and are subject to change. 2 Includes Universities and other HE institutions, SCITT and OU, but excludes employment based routes. Recruitment numbers shown are rounded to the nearest 10. Percentages have been calculated on the actual figure, rather than the rounded. 3 2001/02 was the first year of Fast Track recruitment. 4 Technology includes design and technology, information and communications technology, business studies and home economics. 52001 /02 was the first year of recruitment for citizenship. 6 Other includes classics, dance, economics, media, performing arts and social studies. 7 Vocational subjects includes applied ICT, applied science, applied business, engineering, manufacturing, and health and social care. 2003/04 was the first year of recruitment for these subjects. Source: TDA's ITT Trainee Numbers Census 2000/01 - 2005/06 Available places—DfES.

Table 2 provides the number of teachers gaining qualified teachers status by qualification and phase of training in academic years 2001/02 to 2003/04.

Table 2: Teachers gaining qualified teacher status1 in academic years 2001/02 to 2003/04—Qualification by phase of training, England

2001/02

2002/03

2003/04

UG

PG

Total

UG

PG

Total

UG

PG

Total

Primary and secondary

6,340

16,940

23,280

6,250

19,180

25,430

5,880

21,460

27,340

Primary

5,110

5,610

10,720

5,140

6,800

11,930

4,890

7,580

12,470

Secondary

1,220

11,330

12,550

1,110

12,380

13,490

990

13,880

14,870

Of which:

Mathematics

120

970

1,090

120

1,140

1,270

100

1,420

1,520

English (inc. drama)

70

1,730

1,800

70

2,000

2,070

60

2,110

2,170

Science

120

1,910

2,030

120

2,030

2,140

90

2,230

2,310

Modern foreign languages

20

1,330

1,340

10

1,340

1,350

10

1,440

1,450

Technology2

270

1,270

1,540

260

1,600

1,850

240

1,810

2,060

History

790

790

840

840

850

850

Geography

20

780

810

20

770

800

10

840

850

Art and design

10

630

630

10

720

720

810

810

Music

20

450

470

20

440

460

10

500

510

Religious education

440

440

10

430

440

450

460

Physical education

580

690

1,270

480

700

1,180

470

930

1,390

Other3

360

360

390

390

480

480

1 Includes those trained through SCITTs, but excludes completers through employment based routes. 2 Technology includes Business Studies, Information and Communications Technology and Design and Technology. 3 Other includes Citizenship, Citizenship and Business Studies, Citizenship and History, Social Studies, Classics and Ecc. Note:

“UG” equals Undergraduate, “PG” equals Postgraduate. Source: TDA Performance Profiles.

Table 3 provides the number of teachers teaching by subject in maintained secondary schools and the highest post A-level qualification held in the subject taught.

Table 3: Full-time teachers in maintained secondary schools—Highest post A-level qualification1 held in the subjects they teach2 to year groups 7-13, England

Percentage

Degree3

BEd

PGCE

Cert Ed

Other Qual.

No Qual.

Total teachers (Thousand)

Mathematics

42 ± 3

15 ± 2

9 ± 2

7 ± 1

2 ± 1

24 ± 2

28.2

English

51 ± 3

15 ± 2

7 ± 1

6 ± 1

1 ± 1

20 ± 2

29.4

Combined/General science

62 ± 3

12 ± 2

10 ± 2

4 ± 1

1 ± 1

11 ± 2

28.3

Biology4

71 ± 5

7 ± 3

11 ± 4

3 ± 2

- ± 1

7 ± 3

5.6

Chemistry4

72 ± 5

6 ± 3

12 ± 4

1 ± 1

1 ± 1

7 ± 3

5.2

Physics4

63 ± 6

11 ± 4

15 ± 4

3 ± 2

- ± -

8 ± 3

4.7

Other sciences4

10 ± 6

4 ± 4

5 ± 4

- ± -

- ± -

80 ± 8

1.6

French

54 ± 3

7 ± 2

10 ± 2

3 ± 1

2 ± 1

23 ± 3

16.0

German

47 ± 5

6 ± 3

13 ± 4

1 ± 1

2 ± 1

30 ± 5

6.9

Spanish

37 ± 7

8 ± 4

19 ± 6

- ± -

3 ± 2

33 ± 7

3.6

Other modern languages

18 ± 8

- ± -

9 ± 7

- ± -

3 ± 4

71 ±10

1.4

Design and technology5

26 ± 3

20 ± 3

7 ± 2

21 ± 3

2 ± 1

24 ± 3

20.9

ICT5, 6

13 ± 2

6 ± 1

8 ± 2

2 ± 1

3 ± 1

69 ± 3

18.9

Other/Combined technology5

30 ± 10

13 ± 8

16 ± 7

18 ± 9

2 ± 3

20 ± 9

1.6

Business studies

30 ± 5

11 ± 4

9 ± 3

4 ± 2

3 ± 2

43 ± 5

6.5

Classics

33 ± 7

- ± -

2 ± 4

2 ± -

- ± -

63 ± 7

1.0

History

57 ± 4

9 ± 2

6 ± 2

6 ± 2

- ± -

23 ± 3

13.7

Religious education

22 ± 3

8 ± 2

8 ± 2

4 ± 1

2 ± 1

57 ± 4

14.2

Geography

53 ± 4

9 ± 2

6 ± 2

5 ± 2

1 ± 1

25 ± 3

13.7

Other social studies

35 ± 5

6 ± 3

2 ± 2

2 ± 1

- ± 1

54 ± 6

4.9

Combined arts/humanities/ social studies

5 ± 3

4 ± 2

7 ± 3

1 ± 1

1 ± 1

83 ± 5

5.3

Music

59 ± 5

15 ± 4

5 ± 2

6 ± 3

2 ± 2

13 ± 4

6.3

Drama

25 ± 4

10 ± 3

12 ± 3

6 ± 2

2 ± 1

45 ± 5

8.1

Art and design

54 ± 4

10 ± 3

7 ± 2

9 ± 3

1 ± 1

20 ± 4

9.3

Physical education

25 ± 3

31 ± 3

6 ± 2

13 ± 2

2 ± 1

22 ± 2

21.4

Careers education

2 ± 2

1 ± 2

3 ± 3

4 ± 4

3 ± 4

87 ± 7

1.5

PSHE6

1 ± -

1 ± -

2 ± 1

1 ± -

- ± -

95 ± 1

61.4

General studies

1 ± 1

2 ± 1

1 ± 1

- ± 1

- ± -

95 ± 2

7.1

Citizenship

2 ± 1

1 ± 1

2 ± 1

- ± 1

- ± -

94 ± 2

9.0

Other

32.8

Total2, 7

33 ± -

10 ±-

7 ± -

5 ± -

1 ± -

44 ± -

388.4

‘-’ = zero or less than 0.5.

1 Where a teacher has more than one post A-level qualification in the same subject, the qualification level is determined by the highest level reading from left (Degree) to right (Other Qual.). For example, teachers shown under PGCE have a PGCE but not a degree or BEd in the subject, while those with a PGCE and a degree are shown only under Degree.

2 Teachers are counted once against each subject which they are teaching.

3 Includes higher degrees but excludes BEds.

4 Teachers qualified in combined/general science are treated as qualified to teach biology, chemistry, or physics. Teachers qualified in biology, chemistry or physics are treated as qualified to teach combined/general science.

5 Teachers qualified in other/combined technology are treated as qualified to teach design and technology or information and communication technology. Teachers qualified in design and technology or information and communication technology are treated as qualified to teach other/combined technology.

6 Information and Communication Technology is abbreviated as ICT and Personal, Social and Health Education is abbreviated as PSHE.

7 ‘Other’ not included in total percentages.

Source:

Secondary Schools Curriculum and Staffing Survey 2002.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many (a) vacancies and (b) temporary replacements there are for head teachers in (i) rural and (ii) non-rural areas; and if he will make a statement. (84747)

The information is not available in the format requested.

The following table provides the number of full-time head teacher vacancies and temporarily filled vacancies in January 2006 (provisional), the latest information available.

Full-time head teacher vacancies and full-time temporarily filled head teacher posts in local authority maintained schools in England, January 20061All maintained schoolsMaintained secondary schoolsFull-time head teacher vacancies18030Full-time temporarily filled head teacher posts2660801 Provisional. 2 Temporarily-filled full-time permanent appointments. The definition used is wider than the vacancy definition (bullet points b and c below are in addition to the normal vacancy definition). A post is included in this row of the table: a. where there is no incumbent who is expected to return to the post; b. whether or not filled on a temporary basis, i.e. either without a contract or on a contract of less than one year; c. whether or not advertised; d. where an appointment has been made but not yet taken up. Note: Figures are rounded to the nearest 10. Source: Survey of teachers in service and teacher vacancies, (618g).

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many vacancies there were for (a) infant, (b) primary and (c) secondary school (i) teachers and (ii) head teachers in (A) Greater London and (B) the London borough of Bexley in the most recent 12 months for which figures are available. (85987)

The following table provides the number of full-time primary and secondary school vacancies for head and other teachers in the London Government Office Region and Bexley local authority in January 2005. Vacancies are those that existed at the survey date and not for the full 12 month period. Infant school vacancies are included with primary schools and are not available separately.

Vacancy information for 2006 at local authority and regional level by phase of education will be published in September.

Full-time vacancy1 numbers in London government office regions and Bexley local authority by grade and phase of education, January 2005

Nursery and primary

Secondary

London

Head teachers

14

11

Other teachers2

233

357

Total

247

368

Bexley

Head teachers

0

2

Other teachers2

17

21

Total

17

23

1 A vacancy refers to full-time appointment of at least one term’s duration that, on the survey date in January, had been advertised but not filled. Vacancies include those filled on a temporary basis unless filled by someone with a fixed term contract of one term or more. 2 Includes vacancies for deputy and assistant head teachers, ASTs and post threshold and other qualified classroom grade teachers. Source: Annual survey of teachers in service and teacher vacancies, (618 g)

Venture Capital Funds

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many locally based venture capital funds have been set up since 1999. (84790)

I have been asked to reply.

DTI does not operate locally based venture capital funds. To discover the number of funds run by others, including local authorities, would incur disproportionate cost.

The Small Business Service has invested in nine Regional Venture Capital Funds and three Early Growth Funds with a regional focus.

Minister for Women

Ethnic Minority Employment Task Force

To ask the Minister for Women and Equality what progress has been made with the work of the Ethnic Minority Employment Task Force. (82484)

I have been asked to reply.

The Ethnic Minority Employment Task Force (EMETF) has met regularly since its inception in 2003. Details of its work to fulfil the recommendations of the Strategy Unit's report, “Ethnic Minorities and the Labour Market” (March 2003), have been presented annually to the Economic Affairs, Productivity and Competitiveness (EAPC) by the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions and are available at www.emetaskforce.gov.uk and copies have been placed in the Library.

In 2005, the Task Force was also given responsibility for taking forward the main conclusions of the National Employment Panel's report: “Enterprising People: Enterprising Places” (May 2005). Current priorities include work on the City Strategy; developing an outreach service to focus on non-working ethnic minority partners in low income households; expanding the data and research evidence base; and developing the opportunities presented by the Olympics to raise ethnic minority employment.

The third EMETF annual report will be published later this year and will include the findings of the independent review to be undertaken in the Autumn. The EMETF is supported and advised by the Ethnic Minority Advisory Group (EMAG) which has a membership comprising members of the ethnic minority voluntary, business and training sectors, faith groups, academics and its chair sits on the EMETF.

Constitutional Affairs

Biometrics

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Constitutional Affairs what guidance the Information Commissioner has given to (a) local education authorities and (b) local authorities on the collection and the use of biometric identification, including fingerprint recognition, for the provision of local authority services. (85547)

I understand that the Information Commissioner has received inquiries from a range of public authorities about the use of biometrics for the delivery of services, and that he has provided guidance in response to the specific inquiries. He has not issued generic guidance on the use of biometric identification.

Care Cases

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Constitutional Affairs what steps her Department is taking to increase the proportion of care cases being completed in the courts within 40 weeks by 10 per cent. by 2009-10. (85456)

DCA is working with DfES, the Welsh Assembly, the judiciary, local authorities and other delivery agencies to increase the proportion of cases completed in 40 weeks by implementing the recommendations of the “Review of the Child Care Proceedings System in England and Wales” (published May 2006). This work seeks to reduce delay by focusing on seven key areas:

Ensuring families and children understand proceedings

Exploration of safe and appropriate alternatives to court proceedings

Improved consistency and quality of s 31 (care proceedings) applications to court

Improved case management

Inter-agency working/communications

Judicial allocation/use of court facilities

Experts

Revised statutory guidance for local authorities and new practice directions/protocols for courts will underpin case management processes.

Actions in the past year which are expected to affect the proportion of cases completed in 40 weeks include;

installation of video conferencing equipment in care centres enabling experts to give evidence remotely,

establishment of local family justice councils who have held conferences to identify how local agencies can best work together to reduce delay

piloting of family courts centres (co-located county court and family proceedings courts) allowing for the more efficient management and allocation of court business at local level

piloting the use of case progression officers in family courts

allowing nominated recorders and district judges (county courts) to hear care cases.

Chelmsford Court (PFI)

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Constitutional Affairs what the status is of the Chelmsford magistrates/coroner’s court private finance initiative scheme; when she expects work (a) to commence and (b) to be completed on the building project; and if she will make a statement. (84847)

The Essex magistrates court scheme, of which Chelmsford is part, continues to be within the programme of new court projects. My Department is still finalising investment plans, as part of the development of a Business and Estates Strategy for Her Majesty’s Court Service (HMCS). A further announcement will be made once spending plans have been agreed with Treasury. In March 2006 HMCS purchased a site for the new courthouse in Chelmsford and outline planning approval has been obtained.

Disputes Resolution

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Constitutional Affairs what steps her Department is taking to increase the advice and assistance available to help people resolve their disputes earlier and more effectively. (85455)

In line with the strategy set out in the recent “Getting Earlier, Better Advice to Vulnerable People” document my Department is encouraging closer working among advice leads across Whitehall. This will ensure more effective referral networks are in place so that people get the service they need regardless of their point of access to the system.

My Department is supporting the Legal Services Commission as it implements its new community legal service strategy. In 2005-06 over 708,000 new civil legal aid cases were started by the Legal Services Commission, the highest at any point since 2000.

The DCA also provides funding to the LawWorks project, which aims to increase the delivery of free legal advice to individuals and communities in need.

Incapacity Benefit

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Constitutional Affairs pursuant to the answer of 4 July 2006, Official Report, column 970W, what assumption for planning purposes she has made of the number of incapacity benefit appeal cases (a) by the end of 2006-07 and (b) in each of the subsequent two years. (83882)

The latest work load forecasts for incapacity benefit appeals are as follows. The Government have recently announced plans to replace incapacity benefit through measures in the Welfare Reform Bill currently before Parliament which could have an impact on those figures.

Intake

2006-07

63,698

2007-08

62,149

2008-09

61,714

Special Advocates

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Constitutional Affairs how many statements have been made on behalf of (a) murder and (b) manslaughter victims by special advocates. (84527)

The scheme applies to such cases where a charge is brought on or after 24 April 2006 in one of the five pilot areas. None has yet come to trial or resulted in a guilty plea.

Culture, Media and Sport

Slave Trade

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what plans she has to commemorate in Liverpool the bicentenary of the Act to abolish the British slave trade. (86289)

My Department is committing £250,000 per year towards the running costs of National Museums Liverpool's new International Slavery Museum, which will open on 23 August 2007. National Museums Liverpool is a partner in the understanding slavery initiative museums education project, which supports the teaching of slavery in the classroom. National Museums Liverpool are part of the cross government advisory group on the bicentenary, which is chaired by the Deputy Prime Minister.

Gambling

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport whether she plans to take steps to (a) regulate and (b) place advertising restrictions on betting operators not licensed in the UK; and if she will make a statement. (86105)

The Advertising Standards Authority is working with the Gambling Commission to draw up new codes for gambling advertising, on which it will begin consulting shortly. The Secretary of State also has reserve powers under the Gambling Act 2005 to make regulations with regard to the form, content, timing and location of gambling advertising. She will not hesitate to use these powers if it becomes clear that self-regulation is not sufficient to protect children and vulnerable people from exploitation. Both the ASA codes and any Secretary of State regulations will apply to all non-broadcast advertising by gambling operators, wherever they are licensed.

Ofcom will continue to set, review and revise standards for broadcast advertising by gambling operators. In doing so Ofcom must consult with the Gambling Commission, and reflect any relevant regulations made by the Secretary of State.

Under the Gambling Act 2005 the Gambling Commission has the power to attach a condition to the licences it issues making provision for how gambling facilities may be advertised or described.

In addition, Section 331 of the Gambling Act prohibits any gambling operator based outside the European Economic Area or Gibraltar from advertising in the UK unless a specific exemption has been made for that jurisdiction under sub-section 331(4).

Historic Environment Sites

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what progress has been made towards increasing the numbers visiting designated historic environment sites by 3 per cent. by 2008. (85457)

We are working closely with English Heritage, the National Trust and others on a broad range of policies and programmes to increase participation in the historic environment by the priority groups.

Performance is measured by the “Taking Part” survey and interim results indicate that currently 47 per cent. black and minority ethnic people, 58 per cent. of people with limiting disabilities and 57 per cent. of people from lower socio-economic groups have visited at least one type of historic environment site during the past year. Final baselines will be available at the end of the year, but performance against the target will not be assessed until the end of the target period in 2008.

Libraries

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what progress has been made since the wider efficiency review into libraries carried out by the accountants and consultants PKF in June 2005. (86216)

The PKF report recommended that there were particular efficiencies to be found within the stock procurement systems. The Museums, Libraries and Archives Council (MLA) therefore commissioned PricewaterhouseCoopers to undertake a detailed study of the potential for efficiencies in this area and to develop a model to realise them. PwC will report on its proposals shortly. Work will then follow to implement its proposed model.

We envisage that the work on stock procurement will provide lessons that could be transferred to other areas of public library management and service delivery—for example, in increased joint working and procurement of services such as marketing materials and reading promotions.

PKF also recommended that library authorities should review staff management and staff structures towards optimum efficiency. Although this recommendation was directed at individual authorities, MLA is seeking to encourage the adoption of efficient working practices through current programmes such as peer reviews and through a number of proposed activities in the new 2006-08 “Framework for the Future” action plan.

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what percentage of the funding of public libraries was spent on books in the last period for which figures are available; and what the planned figure is for 2006-07. (86217)

According to the Public Library Statistics for 2004-05, published by the Chartered Institute for Public Finance and Accountancy (CIPFA), the 149 library authorities in England spent £69,010,676 on books and pamphlets and a further £6,201,131 on newspapers, periodicals and magazines out of total revenue expenditure of £912,620,958. These are the latest “actuals” figures available.

Planned expenditure figures for 2006-07 are not held centrally.

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how the role of the Advisory Council for Libraries will differ from that of the Museums, Libraries and Archives Council. (86219)

The Advisory Council on Libraries (ACL) is currently being re-constituted. When this process is complete there will be an equal number of serving public librarians and non-librarians with knowledge or expertise relevant to the work of public libraries. The ACL will advise DCMS Ministers and officials, and also Museums, Libraries and Archives Council (MLA) officials, on a range of public libraries issues. The ACL will meet two or three times a year.

The MLA also advises DCMS and its Ministers as the full-time lead strategic agency for museums, libraries and archives. Working in partnership with its nine regional agencies, the MLA works to improve people's lives by building knowledge, supporting learning, inspiring creativity and celebrating identity. The MLA Partnership acts collectively for the benefit of the sector and the public, leading the transformation of museums, libraries and archives for the future.

Current improvement programmes for public libraries include the various work strands of the Framework for the Future Action Plan, such as the leadership programme, peer reviews and the stock procurement project. It is also leading on work to review the Public Library Service Standards and Impact Measures.

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what is the planned annual budget of the Advisory Council for Libraries. (86220)

The Advisory Council on Libraries (ACL) is currently being re-constituted. When this process is complete there will be 12 members with an equal number of serving public librarians and non-librarians with knowledge or expertise relevant to the work of public libraries.

The ACL will not have an annual budget as its members will be unremunerated, receiving only reasonable travelling and subsistence expenses. These will be paid from DCMS running costs.

London Olympics

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport in what ways she expects Northern Ireland to benefit from the 2012 Olympic Games. (85441)

The Government are determined that the whole of the UK, including Northern Ireland, can contribute to and benefit from the games in 2012.

Anticipated benefits include: increased interest and participation in sport, employment and business opportunities generated by hosting pre-event training camps, volunteering opportunities, an increase in tourism throughout the whole of the UK and the cultural festivities relating to the Cultural Olympiad.

A Nations and Regions Group (NRG), has been established to provide leadership and strategic direction in ensuring that the whole of the UK is engaged with these benefits. Each nation and region, including Northern Ireland, is represented on the NRG and has been tasked with developing a delivery plan to ensure that the many opportunities are realised for their nation or region.

Northern Ireland has established its own task force to drive forward this agenda. The group chaired by the permanent secretary of the Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure (DCAL), includes representation from sport, culture, tourism, Invest NI, local government and other interested bodies who will be responsible for delivering the benefits for Northern Ireland.