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Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Bill (programme)

Volume 450: debated on Tuesday 10 October 2006

Motion made, and Question put forthwith, pursuant to Standing Order No. 83A(6) (Programme motions),

That the following provisions shall apply to the Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Bill:

Committal

1. The Bill shall be committed to a Standing Committee.

Proceedings in Standing Committee

2. Proceedings in the Standing Committee shall (so far as not previously concluded) be brought to a conclusion on Tuesday 31st October 2006.

3. The Standing Committee shall have leave to sit twice on the first day on which it meets.

Consideration and Third Reading

4. Proceedings on consideration shall (so far as not previously concluded) be brought to a conclusion one hour before the moment of interruption on the day on which those proceedings are commenced.

5. Proceedings on Third Reading shall (so far as not previously concluded) be brought to a conclusion at the moment of interruption on that day.

6. Standing Order No. 83B (Programming committees) shall not apply to proceedings on consideration and Third Reading.

Other proceedings

7. Any other proceedings on the Bill (including any proceedings on consideration of any messages from the Lords) may be programmed.—[Mr. Heppell.]

CORPORATE MANSLAUGHTER AND CORPORATE HOMICIDE BILL (CARRY-OVER)

Motion made, and Question put forthwith, pursuant to Standing Order No. 80A (Carry-over motions),

That if, at the conclusion of this Session of Parliament, proceedings on the Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Bill have not been completed, they shall be resumed in the next Session.—[Liz Blackman.]

On a point of order, Mr. Speaker. Earlier today, you and many hundreds of us attended a memorial service for our good friend Mr. Eric Forth. Is there any way in which Standing Orders allow us to have put into Hansard tomorrow that, had Mr. Forth been here tonight, he would have opposed both of those procedural motions, because they were things that he hated?

I remember the right hon. Member, Eric Forth, with great fondness, but I do not think that Standing Orders can reflect anything other than the fact that the hon. Gentleman has now put the matter on the record—that, had Eric Forth been present, he would have opposed those motions. Of course, the one thing that he taught us all was to keep within the strict rules of the House. That was his expertise and he never gave the Speaker any problems because he always kept within those rules. We all regret the passing of Eric Forth, especially today when we attended his memorial service.