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Teachers

Volume 450: debated on Tuesday 10 October 2006

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many (a) academies and (b) fee-paying schools contribute to the teachers’ pension scheme; and whether they are subject to the rules relating to increases in salary during the final years before retirement that apply to maintained schools. (89243)

All academies and 1,283 independent schools participate in the teachers’ pension scheme (TPS).

The TPS is a defined benefit scheme that provides a pension and lump sum based on salary at retirement. The teachers’ pensions regulations contain provision to restrict the salary used to calculate retirement benefits in circumstances where a scheme member has received substantial increase in salary before retirement. This is to safeguard the scheme against a disproportionate level of pension benefits being paid in relation to the contributions that have been received. The regulations do, however, provide for the employer to make a payment to the scheme to cover the actuarial value of the increased retirement benefits and, if that is paid, the full salary would be used. All provisions of the TPS apply equally to all scheme members regardless of where they are employed.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills (1) how many newly-qualified teachers have been given a probationary teaching post in each of the last five years; how many of these teachers have completed their probationary years successfully in each year; how many have gone on to find permanent jobs with (a) the education authority with which they were initially placed and (b) with another authority; how many have found permanent employment in teaching after a period of (i) unemployment, (ii) supply teaching and (iii) other employment; and how many have failed to find permanent teaching posts;

(2) how many teachers failed to secure permanent posts for the 2006-07 school year following their probationary period.

In England teachers who have attained qualified teacher status (QTS) are not given a post for their induction period. It is for newly qualified teachers themselves to find suitable teaching experience. The induction period of three terms need not be continuous service or in a single post. The period should normally be completed within five years of achieving QTS.

Since 2000 the General Teaching Council for England (GTCE) has recorded the number of newly qualified teachers who have successfully completed their induction. The following table provides this information for each year from 2000 to 2005.

Number of newly qualified teachers passing their teaching induction period in England 2000 to 2005

Number

2000

17,600

2001

20,520

2002

21 ,400

2003

22,770

2004

25,830

2005

27,980

Total

136,100

Source: General Teaching Council for England.

In addition the GTCE also records how many teachers remain in teaching service after passing their induction period. In June 2006, of the teachers who had passed their induction since 2000, 81 per cent. were recorded as being in teaching service. Of the remainder some 16 per cent. were known to have left the profession. The status of four per cent. was unknown. It is not known how many of the teachers who are in teaching service are with the employer with whom they passed their induction, or how many are in a permanent post. The employment status of teachers during any gaps in service prior to finding a permanent post is also unknown.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many and what percentage of working days were missed by teachers because of stress-related conditions in the most recent year for which figures are available, broken down by local authority area. (89557)

The information requested is not collected centrally for England. Teacher sickness absence in Scotland is a matter for the Scottish Executive.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what the cost of sickness pay to teachers was in the most recent year for which figures are available. (89558)

There are no figures available in respect of the cost of sickness pay to teachers. Teachers are employed by governing bodies and local authorities and as such figures of this nature may be available at individual local authority level, but are not gathered nationally by the Department.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many teachers have retired on grounds of stress-related illness in each of the last three years. (89559)

The information is not available in the format requested.

The following table provides ill health retirements by diagnosis in each 12 month period from 1 October 2002, the earliest date from which data have been collected in this form. The figures given are for England and Wales only. Ill health retirements for teachers in Scotland are a matter for the Scottish Executive.

Ill health retirements by diagnosis1

Diagnosis

2002-032

2003-042

2004-052

Blood and Blood Forming Organs

25

25

25

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

65

60

60

Circulatory

160

130

135

Congenital Malformations

5

5

3

Digestive

30

45

35

Ear and Mastoid Process

70

80

80

Endocrine, Nutritional and Metabolic

30

30

20

Eye and Adnexa

35

25

30

Genitourinary

30

20

15

Infectious and Parasitic Diseases

3

0

0

Injury, Poisoning and Other External Causes

30

30

40

Mental and Behavioural Disorders

865

905

785

Musculoskeletal—Back

210

195

195

Musculoskeletal—Non Back

130

115

115

Neoplasms

245

260

255

Nervous System

160

155

170

Perinatal Period

3

0

0

Respiratory

70

70

70

Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue

10

5

5

1 Figures are for ill health retirements from all education sectors in England and Wales pensionable under the teachers’ pensions scheme. 2 Each year covers the period 1 October to 30 September.

3 Equals less than 5.

Note:

Figures have been rounded to the nearest 5.

Source:

DfES medical advisers.