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Road Safety

Volume 450: debated on Wednesday 11 October 2006

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many (a) minor and (b) serious accidents occurred on the A102 between the A11 and the A13 in (i) 2005 and (ii) 2006. (89781)

There were (a) 27 slight and (b) three serious personal injury road accidents reported to the police that occurred on the A102 between the A11 and the A13 in 2005. Data for 2006 are not available.

Source:

TfL London Road Safety Unit

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many cyclists were (a) injured and (b) killed in road traffic accidents in (i) the Metropolitan Police area of London, (ii) Southend, (iii) Essex and (iv) England and Wales in (A) 2005 and (B) 2006. (89782)

The number of cyclists (a) injured and (b) killed in personal injury road accidents reported to the police in (i) the Metropolitan Police area of London, (ii) Southend, (iii) Essex and (iv) England and Wales in 2005 are given in the following table. Data for 2006 are not available.

Number of cyclists killed and injured in road traffic injury accidents: 2005

Fatal

Injured1

Total

England and Wales

132

15,650

15,782

Metropolitan Police2

20

2,779

2,799

Southend

0

73

73

Thurrock

1

32

33

Essex County (excluding the unitary authorities of Southend and Thurrock)

2

342

344

1 Includes slight and serious injuries.

2 Excludes City of London Police.

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport where in England and Wales statisticians from his Department monitor seat belt wearing rates; what guidance his Department issues to statisticians on collecting this information; how many (a) males and (b) females are employed to monitor seat belt wearing rates; and if he will make a statement. (89783)

TRL Ltd. undertakes regular observational seat belt wearing surveys for the Department. Information on the methodology employed by TRL Ltd. is given in their published annual leaflets. A copy of the most recent leaflet, LF 2099 of August 2006 has been placed in the Library. Information is also given in a 1990 report “Restraint use by car occupants, 1982-89” by J Broughton, TRL Research Report 289, which can be obtained from TRL Ltd., on 01344 770783, at a cost of £30. Thirteen female TRL employees undertook the most recent survey in April 2006.

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what research he has commissioned into the number of collisions and near-collisions with (a) vehicles, (b) pedestrians and (c) other bicycles as a result of cyclists going through red lights. (89871)

No research has been commissioned by the Department for Transport into collisions resulting from cyclists going through red lights.

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many serious accidents have occurred on (a) the A406 North Circular Road between the Lee Valley and the A105 Green Lanes and (b) the A10 between Tottenham and the M25 in the last five years; and if he will make a statement. (90170)

The number of serious personal injury accidents reported to the police on (a) the A406 North Circular Road between the Lee Valley at the junction of A1009 Hall lane and the A105 Green Lanes; and (b) the A10 between the junction of A109 at Tottenham and its junction with M25 for the last five years are given in the following table.

Number of serious personal injury road accidents 2001-05

(a)

(b)

Junction included in both (a) and (b)1

2000

18

20

3

2001

14

23

2

2002

20

19

3

2003

20

24

a

2004

14

13

1

2005

3

17

0

1 The figures given in columns (a) and (b) have a junction which is common to both lengths of road and therefore the accidents on that junction will be included in both sets of figures. The separate figures for this junction are given in the main answer. Source: TFL LRSU

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many alcohol-related road accidents there have been in each year since 1997, broken down by police authority; and how many deaths occurred. (91320)

Estimates of personal injury road accidents reported to the police, involving illegal alcohol levels and the consequent casualties, in Great Britain are calculated on a national basis only. These estimates are published in an article in “Road Casualties Great Britain: 2005” published on 28 September 2006. Copies of the publication have been placed in the Library of the House.

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessment he has made of the socio-economic group most likely to be involved in a road traffic accident in (a) Surrey and (b) England in the last 10 years. (91740)

The Department has monitored external research on the socio-economic groups most likely to be involved in a road traffic accident.

The most recent research of which we are aware was published in the British Medical Journal in July 2006 and examined socio-economic inequalities in rates of death of children from road accidents in England and Wales.

The research shows that in 2001 to 2003, compared with children of parents in class NS-SEC 11, the death rate of children with parents in class NS-SEC 82 was:

20.6 times higher for deaths as pedestrians;

5.5 times higher for deaths as car occupants; and

27.5 times higher for deaths as cyclists.

We have not made any assessment of the socio-economic groups most likely to be involved in a road traffic accident in Surrey in the last 10 years.

1 National Statistics Socio-Economic Classification Class 1: Higher managerial and professional occupations.

2 National Statistics Socio-Economic Classification Class 8: Never worked and long-term unemployed

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport on what days of the week the highest proportion of road traffic accidents occurred in (a) Surrey and (b) England over the last 10 years. (91741)

Friday had the highest proportion of road traffic personal injury accidents in both (a) Surrey and (b) England for every year from 1996 to 2005.

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many speed cameras are in operation, broken down by county. (91742)

The following table shows the number of speed camera sites, split by type of speed camera, in each safety camera partnership area in England and Wales as at 4 October 2006.

Partnership name

Fixed

Mobile

Red light-speed

Routes

Average speed

Total

Avon and Somerset

67

176

243

Bedfordshire

44

70

114

Cambridgeshire

53

40

93

Cheshire

42

32

74

Cleveland

3

45

48

Cumbria

2

38

40

Derbyshire

47

81

128

Devon and Cornwall

75

80

155

Dorset

51

54

105

Essex

82

141

223

Gloucestershire

26

45

71

Greater Manchester

101

163

264

Hampshire

31

38

69

Hertfordshire

56

37

93

Humberside

3

79

2

84

Kent and Medway

73

56

129

Lancashire

272

74

346

Leicestershire

15

73

1

89

Lincolnshire

45

19

64

London

401

401

Merseyside

30

22

52

Mid and South Wales

111

263

374

Norfolk

11

24

8

43

North Wales

13

61

74

Northamptonshire

40

42

2

84

Northumbria

43

86

129

Nottinghamshire

11

36

1

2

10

60

South Yorkshire

55

63

1

119

Staffordshire

65

33

98

Suffolk

8

48

56

Surrey

17

4

21

Sussex

51

26

77

Thames Valley

216

60

276

Warwickshire

21

37

58

West Mercia

15

41

56

West Midlands

139

16

155

West Yorkshire

110

51

161

Wiltshire

8

60

68

Grand total

2,453

2,314

2

12

13

4,794

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) which county had the (a) highest, (b) lowest number of road traffic accidents per registered vehicle in 2005-06; (91743)

(2) how many road traffic accidents per registered vehicle there were in (a) Surrey and (b) England in 2005-06.

The number of personal injury road accidents per 1,000 registered vehicles was 9.0 in London (highest), 6.6 in Surrey, 2.6 in Western Isles (lowest) and 6.3 in England.

It should be noted that an accident may not occur in the same county as the one in which the vehicle is registered.

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessment he has made of the potential for (a) speed cameras and (b) speed camera warning signs to cause drivers to reduce speed recklessly when seen. (91745)

The Department's objective is to encourage and assist people to drive within the posted speed limit at all times. The purpose of deploying speed cameras is to further encourage them to do so at locations where excessive speed is a known danger. Consistent with this aim, cameras operating within the National Safety Camera Programme are required to meet strict visibility and conspicuity rules in order to enhance their deterrent effect.

No assessment has been made of the potential for speed cameras and speed camera warning signs to cause drivers to reduce speed recklessly when seen. We are aware that some speeding drivers check or reduce their speed on the approach to camera sites. However there is no evidence that this is done recklessly. Neither is there evidence that this is a cause of accidents. In any case, drivers who comply with the posted speed limit should not need to reduce their speed when they see a speed camera or camera warning sign.

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what plans he has for changes to (a) the way in which speed limits apply and (b) the limits that apply. (91746)

The Government have no current plans to change the national speed limits for which we are responsible.

New guidance to traffic authorities on setting local speed limits was published by the Department on 8 August 2006. This requested authorities to review speed limits and implement any changes on their A and B roads by 2011.

This process is designed to improve speed limit consistency across the road network and as a result some speed limits may increase or decrease dependent on the local evidence and needs.

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether records are kept on the number of road traffic accidents per year involving ambulances; and if he will make a statement. (92418)

In 2005, there were 291 personal injury road accidents involving an ambulance that were reported to the police.

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how much has been spent on advertising warning of the dangers of (a) drink driving, (b) driving after consuming illegal drugs, (c) driving whilst using a mobile telephone and (d) driving over the speed limit in each year since 1997. (92639)

The dangers of drink driving, drug driving, speeding and driving while using a mobile telephone form part of the Government's THINK! road safety campaign. The Government are investing around £15 million in the THINK! campaign in this fiscal year.

The campaign advertising costs for the above campaigns since 2002-2003 fiscal year are as follows:

Campaign

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

Drink Driving

£1 .64 million

£2.1 million

£2.31 million

£2.7 million

1£3.0 million

Drug Driving

nil

£138,000

£150,000

£223,000

1£260,000

Mobile Phones

£189,000

£900,000

£411,000

500,000

1£400,000

Speed

£1.76 million

£1.6 million

£1.87 million

£1.64 million

1£2.1 million

1 Expected outturn

Following departmental reorganisations, provision of total expenditure figures for the period prior to 2002 would involve disproportionate costs.