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Death Rates (Bexley)

Volume 450: debated on Monday 23 October 2006

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many deaths there were from (a) cancer and (b) heart disease in the London borough of Bexley in each year since 1997. (96231)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the National Statistician who has been asked to reply.

Letter from Colin Mowl, dated 23 October 2006:

The National Statistician has been asked to reply to your recent question asking how many deaths there were from (a) cancer and (b) heart disease in the London borough of Bexley in each year since 1997. I am replying in her absence. (96231)

The attached tables provide the numbers of deaths where (a) cancer and (b) heart disease was the underlying cause of death, for 1997 to 2005 (the latest year available), for the London borough of Bexley.

Table 1: Number of deaths where cancer was the underlying cause of death,1London borough of Bexley, 1997 to 20052

Male

Female

Total

1997

291

287

578

1998

317

293

610

1999

279

282

561

2000

268

291

559

2001

312

253

565

2002

293

258

551

2003

271

275

546

2004

264

247

511

2005

276

250

526

1Cause of death was defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes 140-208 for the years 1997 to 2000, and Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes C00-C97 for 2001 onwards. The introduction of ICD-10 in 2001 means that the numbers of deaths from this cause before 2001 are not completely comparable with later years.

2 Figures are for deaths registered in each calendar year.

Table 2: Number of deaths where heart disease was the underlying cause ofdeath,1 London borough of Bexley, 1997 to 20052

Male

Female

Total

1997

240

201

441

1998

261

192

453

1999

222

204

426

2000

235

201

436

2001

218

175

393

2002

208

176

384

2003

187

190

377

2004

211

170

381

2005

186

150

336

1 Cause of death was defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes 410-414 for the years 1997 to 2000, and Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes 120-125 for 2001 onwards. The introduction of ICD-10 in 2001 means that the numbers of deaths from this cause before 2001 are not completely comparable with later years.

2 Figures are for deaths registered in each calendar year.

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what the average length of life is for (a) men and (b) women in the London borough of Bexley; and what it was in (i) 1997 and (ii) 2001 in each case. (96233)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the National Statistician who has been asked to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 23 October 2006:

As National Statistician, I have been asked to reply to your recent question asking what the average length of life is for (a) men and (b) women in the London borough of Bexley, and what it was in (i) 1997 and (ii) 2001 in each case. (96233)

Life expectancy figures are calculated as three year rolling averages. The attached table provides the period life expectancy at birth for (a) men and (b) women in the London borough of Bexley, in (i) 1996-98, (ii) 2000-02, and (iii) 2002-04 (the latest period available).

Table 1: Period life expectancy at birth1, London borough of Bexley2, 1996-98, 2000-02 and 2002-043

Years of life

Male

Female

Year3

Life expectancy

95 per cent. confidence interval4

Life expectancy

95 per cent. confidence interval4

1996-98

75.9

75.4

76.3

80.4

80.0

80.8

2000-02

77.0

76.6

77.5

81.2

80.8

81.6

2002-04

77.6

77.2

78.1

81.5

81.1

81.9

1 Period life expectancy at birth is an estimate of the average number of years a newborn baby would survive or she experienced the area’s age-specific mortality rates for that time period throughout his or her life. The figure reflects mortality among those living in the area in each time period rather than mortality among those born in each area. It is not therefore the number of years a baby born in the area in each time period could actually expect to live, both because the death rates of the area are likely to change in the future and because many of those born in the area will live elsewhere for at least some part of their lives.

2 Using local authority boundaries as of 2005 for all the years shown.

3 Three year rolling averages, based on deaths registered in each year and mid-year population.

4 Confidence intervals are a measure of the statistical precision of an estimate and show the range of uncertainty around the estimated figure. Calculations based on small numbers of events are often subject to random fluctuations. As a general rule, if the confidence interval around one figure overlaps with the interval around another, we cannot say with certainty that there is more than a chance difference between the two figures.