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Citizenship Education

Volume 450: debated on Wednesday 25 October 2006

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what steps he is taking to improve the teaching of citizenship in those schools where a weakness in such teaching has been identified. (95894)

Schools are expected to address their weaknesses following self evaluation and Ofsted reports. To support this, we funded the production of a self evaluation tool for both primary and secondary schools. Additionally, 200 initial teacher training places in citizenship education are being made available each year and the DfES has published a CPD handbook and is funding 1200 citizenship continuing professional development (CPD) places over the next two years to enable citizenship teachers to broaden and deepen their subject knowledge. We continue to support the Association of Citizenship Teachers and work with a range of organisations to provide resources and support for teachers.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many citizenship specialist trained teachers are employed in each of the local education authorities in England. (94898)

Information on the number of citizenship specialist trained teachers in service is not available at local authority level.

The following table provides the number of teachers teaching by subject, including citizenship, in maintained secondary schools and the highest post A-level qualification held in the subject taught. The information is from 2002, the latest available.

Teachers in Service: full-time teachers in maintained secondary schools—highest post A-level qualifications1 held in the subjects they teach2 to year groups 7-13, England

Percentage

Degree3

BEd

PGCE

Cert Ed

Other Qual.

No Qual.

Total teachers (Thousand)

Mathematics

42 ± 3

15 ± 2

9 ± 2

7 ± 1

2 ± 1

24 ± 2

28.2

English

51 ± 3

15 ± 2

7 ± 1

6 ± 1

1 ± 1

20 ± 2

29.4

Combined/General Science

62 ± 3

12 ± 2

10 ± 2

4 ± 1

1 ± 1

11 ± 2

28.3

Biology4

71 ± 5

7 ± 3

11 ± 4

3 ± 2

- ± 1

7 ± 3

5.6

Chemistry4

72 ± 5

6 ± 3

12 ± 4

1 ± 1

1 ± 1

7 ± 3

5.2

Physics4

63 ± 6

11 ± 4

15 ± 4

3 ± 2

- ± -

8 ± 3

4.7

Other Sciences4

10 ± 6

4 ± 4

5 ± 4

- ± -

- ± -

80 ± 8

1.6

French

54 ± 3

7 ± 2

10 ± 2

3 ± 1

2 ± 1

23 ± 3

16.0

German

47 ± 5

6 ± 3

13 ± 4

1 ± 1

2 ± 1

30 ± 5

6.9

Spanish

37 ± 7

8 ± 4

19 ± 6

- ± -

3 ± 2

33 ± 7

3.6

Other Modern Languages

18 ± 8

- ± -

9 ± 7

- ± -

3 ± 4

71 ± 10

1.4

Design and Technology5

26 ± 3

20 ± 3

7 ± 2

21 ± 3

2 ± 1

24 ± 3

20.9

ICT5, 6

13 ± 2

6 ± 1

8 ± 2

2 ± 1

3 ± 1

69 ± 3

18.9

Other/Combined Technology5

30 ± 1 0

13 ± 8

16 ± 7

18 ± 9

2 ± 3

20 ± 9

1.6

Business Studies

30 ± 5

11 ± 4

9 ± 3

4 ± 2

3 ± 2

43 ± 5

6.5

Classics

33 ± 7

- ± -

2 ± 4

2 ± -

- ± -

63 ± 7

1.0

History

57 ± 4

9 ± 2

6 ± 2

6 ± 2

- ± -

23 ± 3

13.7

Religious Education

22 ± 3

8 ± 2

8 ± 2

4 ± 1

2 ± 1

57 ± 4

14.2

Geography

53 ± 4

9 ± 2

6 ± 2

5 ± 2

1 ± 1

25 ± 3

13.7

Other Social Studies

35 ± 5

6 ± 3

2 ± 2

2 ± 1

- ± 1

54 ± 6

4.9

Combined Arts/Humanities/Social Studies

5 ± 3

4 ± 2

7 ± 3

1 ± 1

1 ± 1

83 ± 5

5.3

Music

59 ± 5

15 ± 4

5 ± 2

6 ± 3

2 ± 2

13 ± 4

6.3

Drama

25 ± 4

10 ± 3

12 ± 3

6 ± 2

2 ± 1

45 ± 5

8.1

Art and Design

54 ± 4

10 ± 3

7 ± 2

9 ± 3

1 ± 1

20 ± 4

9.3

Physical Education

25 ± 3

31 ± 3

6 ± 2

13 ± 2

2 ± 1

22 ± 2

21.4

Careers Education

2 ± 2

1 ± 2

3 ± 3

4 ± 4

3 ± 4

87 ± 7

1.5

PSHE6

1 ± -

1 ± -

2 ± 1

1 ± -

- ± -

95 ± 1

61.4

General Studies

1 ± 1

2 ± 1

1 ± 1

- ± 1

- ± -

95 ± 2

7.1

Citizenship

2 ± 1

1 ± 1

2 ± 1

- ± 1

- ± -

94 ± 2

9.0

Other

32.8

Total2, 7

33 ± -

10 ± -

7 ± -

5 ± -

1 ± -

44 ± -

388.4

‘-’ = zero or less than 0.5. 1 Where a teacher has more than one post A-level qualification in the same subject, the qualification level is determined by the highest level reading from left (Degree) to right (Other Qual.). For example, teachers shown under PGCE have a PGCE but not a degree or BEd in the subject, while those with a PGCE and a degree are shown only under Degree. 2 Teachers are counted once against each subject which they are teaching. 3 Includes higher degrees but excludes BEds. 4 Teachers qualified in combined/general science are treated as qualified to teach biology, chemistry or physics. Teachers qualified in biology, chemistry or physics are treated as qualified to teach combined/general science. 5 Teachers qualified in other/combined technology are treated as qualified to teach design and technology or information and communication technology. Teachers qualified in design and technology or information and communication technology are treated as qualified to teach other/combined technology. 6 Information and Communication Technology is abbreviated as ICT and Personal Social and Health Education is abbreviated as PSHE. 7 ‘Other’ not included in total percentages. Source: Secondary Schools Curriculum and Staffing Survey 2002.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills (1) if he will introduce a formal qualification in citizenship; (96188)

(2) whether he plans to extend the length of time secondary school pupils spend studying citizenship;

(3) what assessment he has made of the effect of citizenship classes on tackling extremism.

A short course GCSE in citizenship studies has been offered since 2003. This was developed to give pupils the opportunity to obtain a qualification recognizing their achievements at key stage 4. Over 54,000 candidates took the GCSE in 2006, an increase from 38,000 in 2005. It remains the fastest growing GCSE subject. Due to demand from schools we have developed subject criteria for both a full course GCSE and A level with a view to examination boards offering these qualifications.

There is no specified amount of time schools must teach citizenship. Schools are free to teach the subject in the way which best suits their school and pupils’ circumstances. We believe this flexibility is important in maintaining the ability of schools to provide delivery of citizenship tailored to the needs of their pupils.

Education can help to break down class and social barriers and plays a critical role in promoting respect and understanding. One of the aims of citizenship education is to educate pupils about appropriate forms of political engagement, legal and human rights and responsibilities and to engage in debates about political, moral and social issues. Schools are also required to teach pupils about the importance of resolving conflict fairly.