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Literacy

Volume 451: debated on Tuesday 7 November 2006

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills which 10 local education authorities have the poorest levels of literacy for those aged (a) five, (b) 11 and (c) 16 years. (98057)

The information requested is set out as follows:

(a) 5-year-olds

The available information for the “Communication, Language and Literacy” area of learning is shown in the following table. Local authority figures for 2005 were published as an annex (Table B) to the final Statistical First Release “Foundation Stage Profile: 2005 National Results” (SFR 03/2006) in February 2006.

The lowest 10 attaining local authorities by percentage of children working securely1,2 within the Early Learning Goals in the communication, language and literacy area of learning—2005

Percentage

Language for communication and thinking

Barking and Dagenham

46

Slough

59

Middlesbrough

63

Leicester

63

Hartlepool

65

Kingston Upon Hull, City of

67

Greenwich

67

Rotherham

68

Tower Hamlets

68

Torbay

69

Linking sounds and letters

Barking and Dagenham

28

Middlesbrough

43

Leicester

43

Greenwich

43

Nottingham

43

Waltham Forest

44

Lewisham

46

Luton

46

Newham

50

Kingston Upon Hull, City of

51

Reading

Barking and Dagenham

44

Middlesbrough

48

Leicester

48

Greenwich

52

Hartlepool

56

Waltham Forest

57

Newham

57

Kingston Upon Hull, City of

57

Lewisham

58

Slough

58

Writing

Barking and Dagenham

28

Middlesbrough

39

Leicester

41

North Somerset

41

Kingston Upon Hull, City of

43

Greenwich

44

Southampton

45

Luton

45

Reading

47

Medway

47

1 Care should be taken when comparing the relative attainment levels between local authorities because of the unequal impact of moderation and assessment on the figures. 2 A scale score of six or more indicates that a child is working securely within the Early Learning Goals.

The provisional national figures for 2006 recently published on 26 October 2006 in Statistical First Release “Foundation Stage Profile 2006: National Results 2006 (Provisional)” (SFR42/2006) suggest that improvements in assessments and moderation may still be impacting widely on the results across the country. Final local authority data are expected to be published in January.

(b) 11-year-olds

National Curriculum assessments at key stage 2 were published on 24 August 2006 (SFR31/2006). The following table shows the percentage of pupils achieving the target level 4 in English in the 10 lowest ranking local authorities.

Provisional key stage 2 National Curriculum test results—2006

LA name

Percentage of pupils achieving Level 4+ English

City of London

64

Hackney

70

Nottingham City

70

Leicester City

71

Manchester

72

Barnsley

72

Sheffield

72

Stoke-on-Trent

72

City of Bristol

73

City of Kingston upon Hull

73

England all schools

79

(c ) 16-year-olds

The following table shows provisional figures for the percentage of 16 year old pupils achieving a grade A*- C in GCSE English in 2006.

Provisional GCSE results—2006

LA name

Percentage of 16 year olds achieving grades A* to C in GCSE English

Knowsley

36.6

City of Kingston upon Hull

38.9

Nottingham City

39.9

Middlesbrough

40.9

Manchester

42.2

Sandwell

43.4

City of Bristol

43.6

Portsmouth

43.7

Tower Hamlets

44.6

Walsall

45.1

England all schools key stage 4

59

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what proportion of educational institutions have had written materials available in a format accessible to those with reading disabilities in each year since 1997. (98174)

[holding answer 2 November 2006]: The Government do not collect this information centrally. Under part 4 of the Disability Discrimination Act, schools, colleges and universities have a duty to make reasonable adjustments to ensure that disabled pupils and students are not put at a substantial disadvantage in comparison to those who are not disabled. With the exception of schools this could include the provision of written materials in alternative formats. For schools the reasonable adjustments duty does not include the provision of auxiliary aids or services as they have a duty to plan strategically to increase access, over time, to schools. This duty includes planning to provide written material in alternative formats to ensure accessibility.