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Waste Management

Volume 453: debated on Monday 27 November 2006

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what discussions he has had with (a) the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, (b) the Greater London Authority and (c) the Olympic Delivery Authority on whether London waste authorities should be in general conformity with the Mayor's Municipal Waste Management Strategy when undertaking their litter functions under Part IV of the Environmental Protection Act 1990; and if he will make a statement. (100772)

Some discussion has taken place between relevant officials in this Department and the Greater London Authority. No discussions have taken place with the Department for Culture Media and Sport and the Olympic Delivery Authority regarding whether London waste authorities should be in general conformity with the Mayor's Municipal Waste Management Strategy when undertaking their litter functions under Part IV of the Environmental Protection Act 1990.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what definition he uses of waste authorities (a) having regard to and (b) being in general conformity with the Mayor’s Municipal Waste Strategy when delivering their functions under part II of the Environment Protection Act 1990 in the context of “The Greater London Authority: The Government’s Final Proposals for Additional Powers and Responsibilities for the Mayor and Assembly”; and if he will make a statement. (100773)

On 13 July this year, the Government announced the outcome of their review of the powers and responsibilities of the Mayor of London and the Greater London Authority. As part of this, the Government announced a change in the requirement for waste authorities to “have regard to” the Mayor’s Municipal Waste Management Strategy in delivering their waste service to

“acting in general conformity with”

the Mayor’s strategy. This will be defined further in guidance, which will follow in due course.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what statutory powers the London Waste and Recycling Forum is expected to have to deal with (a) waste management, (b) the introduction of new waste management technology, (c) the co-ordination of the transportation of waste and use of the river and canal network, (d) climate change, (e) the setting up of a hydrogen fuel network, (f) finding cost efficiencies, (g) delivering the landfill directive, (h) reducing the export of waste to landfills in regions surrounding London and (i) the London street scene. (100844)

[holding answer 20 November 2006]: The London-wide Waste and Recycling Forum will bring stakeholders together to deliver improved performance on waste minimisation and recycling, promote collaborative action and link waste with other London priorities around climate change, transport and employment. The Government do not propose that the forum should have statutory powers.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what statutory powers the Mayor will have under proposals set out in July by the Greater London Authority to deliver the litter aspects of the Mayor’s waste strategy. (100845)

[holding answer 20 November 2006]: The Mayor will have no statutory powers under the proposals set out in July by the Greater London Authority to deliver the litter aspects of his waste strategy.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment he has made of the potential to introduce a regional element to the Waste Infrastructure Development Programme for English regions outside London. (100998)

[holding answer 22 November 2006]: The Waste Infrastructure Development Programme (WIDP) is a national programme which will work with local authorities and the regions to accelerate the building of new waste diversion infrastructure.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what plans there are to dispose of London’s residual waste to landfill sites outside London. (101204)

Waste planning for London is the responsibility of the Mayor, whose Spatial Strategy envisages London becoming 85 per cent. self-sufficient with regards to waste management by 2020. The Government propose to strengthen the Mayor’s waste planning powers to assist him in providing the necessary additional waste management capacity in London.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how much of London’s waste was disposed of at Newton Longville landfill site in the last 12 months; and how much he estimates will be disposed of at Newton Longville landfill site in each of the next 10 years. (101209)

The Environment Agency holds records of waste arising from London disposed of at the Newton Longville landfill site. Their data, based on operator waste returns, show that 11,668.78 tonnes of London’s waste were disposed at the site from April 2005 to March 2006; 15,169.62 tonnes were disposed from April 2006 to September 2006.

The Environment Agency does not hold, or have access to, data on future disposal rates and waste origins for this site. This is a commercial matter between the landfill operator, the waste recycling group, and any London boroughs that have contracts with the operator. The Mayor of London’s Waste Planning Office deals with the matter of waste planning for the London boroughs.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what discussions he has had with Gloucestershire County Council on its proposals to concentrate its handling of composting and waste food disposal at Javelin Park, Haresfield, Stroud constituency. (101412)

No such discussions have taken place. The Government believe that local authorities are best placed to make local waste management decisions.