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Learning and Skills Council

Volume 454: debated on Tuesday 5 December 2006

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many staff were employed by the Learning and Skills Council in each year since 2001, broken down by area of responsibility. (103650)

The information requested is provided as follows:

Directorate

Year ended 31 March 2002

Year ended 31 March 2003

Year ended 31 March 2004

Chairman, Chief Executive's Office

23

31

26

Finance

113

123

139

HR and Corporate Services

110

108

137

Policy and Development (Learning Programmes)

74

101

94

Operations

112

147

173

National Contracts Service

5

27

29

Quality and Standards

47

52

53

Communications and Strategic Planning

35

43

47

Local LSCs

4,175

4,165

4,088

Total

4,694

4,797

4,786

Figures for years ending 31 March 2005 and 2006 reflect the LSC's new structure.

Directorate

Year ended 31 March 2005

Year ended 31 March 2006

Learning

127

178

Skills

102

124

Resources

483

531

Strategy and Communications

65

57

Human Resources

120

110

Local LSCs

3409

3451

Total

4306

4451

Source:

LSC Annual Report and Accounts

The figures are for the average number of staff employed by the LSC each year and include temporary staff and agency staff. A rise in staff numbers occurred between March 2002 and March 2003 as the LSC began to build up the organisation, and took on significant new responsibilities, including the funding of school sixth forms. During 2004 the LSC undertook a re-shaping exercise which resulted in a fall in numbers in March 2005. Staff numbers subsequently increased slightly, reflecting the further work which was transferred by the Department to the LSC during 2005, including education maintenance allowances. However, we anticipate a reduction in the average number of staff in post between 2006 and 2007 as a consequence of the announcement in September 2005 by Mark Haysom, the Learning and Skills Council's chief executive, of proposals for a new structure for the organisation. This new structure aims to make the LSC more effective at identifying and responding to local learning and skills needs, and to achieve a less bureaucratic and more strategic relationship with partners and providers. This process is now nearing completion, and will achieve estimated savings of up to £40 million, which could be released to the front line for the further benefit of learners. As a result, the LSC will have a strong regional and local capacity, spending less time on transactional processes and more time developing relationships with key partners and stakeholders.