Skip to main content

Terrorism Act

Volume 455: debated on Monday 8 January 2007

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many of the individuals detained for a period of (a) 27 and (b) 28 days under the Terrorism Act 2006 after 8 August 2006 were subsequently charged with a criminal offence under the Act. (108822)

The maximum period of detention pre-charge was extended to 28 days with effect from 25 July 2006. Statistics compiled from police records show that from this date to 30 September 2006, six individuals were held for 27 to 28 days. Of these, three were charged under the Terrorism Act 2006 and three were released without charge.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people have been detained in connection with terrorism-related inquiries and then released since the Terrorism Act 2006 came into effect; for how many days each of those detainees were held in detention; and how many of those detainees the police would have wished to detain for a period longer than 28 days while they continued their inquiries. (109771)

[holding answer 19 December 2006]: The maximum period of detention pre-charge was extended to 28 days by the Terrorism Act 2006 which came into effect on 25 July 2006. Statistics compiled from police records show that 10 people have been held for a period over 14 days. Of those 10 individuals one was held for 14-15 days, three were held for 19-20 days and six were held for 27-28 days.

The Home Office will not comment on the number of detainees that the police may have wished to detain for longer than 28 days. This is an operational matter for the police service.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he plans to review the proscription under the Terrorism Act 2000 of the People’s Mojahedin Organisation of Iran (Mojahedin-e Khalk) in the light of the judgment of the European Court of Justice in case T-228/02. (109775)

The Court of First Instance did not rule on the substantive question as to whether People Mojahedin Organisation of Iran is a terrorist group; its judgement was on EU procedures, and as such has no effect on the UK’s domestic proscription arrangements