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Departmental Finance

Volume 455: debated on Wednesday 10 January 2007

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much was paid by his Department to (a) the Global Fund to fight AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria and (b) the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation in each year since 2000-01; and how these contributions were classified. (112768)

DFID paid £259 million to the Global Fund to fight AIDS, TB and Malaria from 2000 to 2006 as follows:

Global Fund to fight AIDS, TB and Malaria: DFID spend 2000 to 2006

£ million

2000

2001

2002

50

2003

25

2004

33

2005

51

2006

100

Total

259

DFID paid £44.32 million to the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation from 2000 to 2006 as follows:

Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation: DFID spend 2000 to 2006

£ million

2000

3

2001

7

2002

7.28

2003

0.28

2004

13.99

2005

0

2006

12.77

Total

44.32

DFID’s contributions to the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation were classified as bilateral official development assistance. Contributions to the Global Fund to fight AIDS, TB and Malaria were classified as multilateral assistance, except for the costs associated with the UK-hosted 2005 Replenishment Conference, which were reported as bilateral official development assistance.

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development in which recipient countries his Department pools funds with other donors to give poverty reduction budget support. (113166)

DFID generally provides poverty reduction budget support (PRBS) direct to a partner Government account rather than through any intermediary. In this respect DFID financing is not pooled with those from other donors prior to the release of funds to the respective Government account.

However, in most countries where we deliver PRBS other donors also provide this form of assistance directly to the Government. We work closely with other donors, for example, in many countries a joint Memorandum of Understanding governs the management of the PRBS relationship between Government and donors; performance monitoring frameworks are prepared jointly and jointly assessed and discussed with the Government.

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what criteria are used in classifying bilateral aid earmarked for a specific programme as (a) sector budget support included under budget heading PRBS and (b) sector wide programmes included under budget heading Other Financial Aid; and how much was allocated to each category in each year since 2000-01. (113171)

Aid is classified as poverty reduction budget support (PRBS) if it is merged with other domestic resources and accounted for alongside the rest of the partner Government's expenditure through their reporting and accounting systems and reports of the Auditor General. Sector budget support is aid that is earmarked for expenditure either in a particular sector, sub sector, programme, or set of expenditure lines. The general principle is that this is aid which is spent using national or sub-national financial management, procurement and accountability systems. Before deciding to provide sector budget support a fiduciary risk assessment is undertaken to assess the partner Government Public Financial Management Administration systems for the effective use of and accounting for the funds.

For financial aid to be classified as a sector wide approach (SWAp), the following criteria would need to be met:

There is a comprehensive sector policy and strategy in place:

An annual sector expenditure programme and medium term Sectoral Expenditure Framework:

Donor coordination is government led:

Major donors can provide support within the agreed framework.

As well as at least one of the following:

A significant number of donors committed to moving towards greater reliance on government financial and accountability systems:

A common approach by donors to implementation and management.

Figures for DFID expenditure on sector budget support are published in Statistics on International Development, copies of which are available in the Library. The relevant figures are reproduced in Table 1 alongside estimates of DFID expenditure on sector wide approaches.

Table 1: DFID financial aid allocated to sector budget support and sector wide approaches

£000

Sector budget support

Sector wide approaches

2000-01

24,098

23,992

2001-02

22,718

35,195

2002-03

23,685

40,986

2003-04

44,724

33,974

2004-05

115,752

23,286

2005-06

195,870

53,286

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much of the £8.5 billion on aid for education announced in April 2006 has been earmarked to promote education for females. (113344)

In DFID’s 2006 White Paper on International Development, “Making governance work for the poor”, we made a commitment to support special initiatives to get more girls into school. We have just published the first Progress Report of DFID’s 2005 girls’ education strategy ‘Girls’ education: towards a better future for all’ which provides more details. Copies of the report are being placed in the Library.

The UK’s £8.5 billion funding commitment to education in developing countries will mainly be used to support partner Governments with predictable funding against which they can prepare ambitious 10 year education sector plans to achieve the education millennium development goals. The plans will focus on investment in schools, including recruiting and training more teachers, getting more pupils, including girls and disadvantaged children, into and completing school and improving the quality of education. So at least half of this funding will benefit girls directly or indirectly.

The development of education sector plans is being led by the developing countries, with donors including the UK contributing. Individual allocations of the £8.5 billion, including special initiatives for girls, will be decided at country level.