Skip to main content

National DNA Database

Volume 455: debated on Wednesday 10 January 2007

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what proportion of offenders convicted in 2005 of (a) violent offences, (b) theft and handling of stolen goods, (c) burglary, (d) fraud and forgery, (e) criminal damage and (f) drugs offences have a profile on the National DNA Database. (108679)

The National DNA Database records the DNA profile for a particular individual. It does not hold data on arrest and criminal records. This information is held on the Police National Computer (PNC). At present the facilities do not exist on PNC to provide the information requested. However, as standard police practice is to take a DNA sample on arrest, we expect that almost all those convicted of the offences named have a profile on the NDNAD.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what proportion of the prison population has a profile on the National DNA Database. (108680)

The NDNAD does not record whether people on it are in prison. However, there are good reasons for believing that the great majority of the prison population has a profile on the NDNAD. Forces have had the power to retain DNA taken from those convicted of recordable offences since the establishment of the DNA Database in 1995. For the first few years this power was exercised in relation to more serious offenders, but from 2000 onwards additional funding was made available under the DNA Expansion Programme to make it standard practice to take samples from all offenders. In addition, two prisoner sampling projects have been undertaken, most recently in 2003, to take DNA from any prisoner who had not already been sampled, for example because they had been imprisoned before DNA sampling was widely practiced.