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Police

Volume 455: debated on Thursday 18 January 2007

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to his written statement of 27 November 2006, Official Report, column 82WS, on local policing, what representations were made by (a) individual chief police officers, (b) the Association of Chief Police Officers, (c) individual police authorities and (d) the Association of Police Authorities on the number of police community support officers needed for the neighbourhood policing project; and if he will place such representations in the Library. (109607)

PCSOs and the appropriate level of resourcing to deliver and sustain neighbourhood policing in 2007-08 and beyond have been discussed generally in almost all official and ministerial meetings and discussions on policing (both informal and formal) in recent months and leading up to my written statement of 27 November 2006, Official Report, columns 82-86WS. The Association of Police Authorities and the Association of Chief Police Authorities have represented the police service as a whole in these discussions, although individual chiefs and chairs have also raised these issues.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to his answer of 14 December 2006, Official Report, column 1324W, on the police, which police forces in England and Wales have collected the data referred to, other than the Metropolitan Police Service; and if he will make a statement. (112869)

[holding answer 8 January 2007]: All police forces, other than the Cambridgeshire constabulary, provided activity-based costing data to the Home Office, covering the 2004-05 financial year. This data was reported under a number of headings including robberies, violence against the person and burglary in a dwelling. Non-incident linked paperwork and checking paperwork (supervisory) are not costed specifically within the activity-based costing returns submitted to the Home Office.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many police officers there are in (a) England, (b) Staffordshire, (c) Stoke on Trent and (d) Trent Valley division; (114969)

(2) how many police officers there are in (a) England, (b) Staffordshire, (c) Stoke on Trent, (d) Trent Valley and (e) Tamworth per 100,000 head of population.

Police officer strength and the number of police officers per 100,000 head of population, by police force area, are given in Home Office Statistical Bulletin, Police Service Strength England and Wales 31 March 2006, available for download from:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs06/hosb1306.pdf

Police officer strength and the number of police officers per 100,000 head of population, by basic command unit, are given in the additional tables of the above mentioned publication, available for download from:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs06/hosb1306add_tab.xls

Police strength data for the town of Tamworth are not available. The available local data for Staffordshire Basic Command Units are given in the following table.

Police officer strength (FTE)1 and officers per 100,000 population by country, force and BCU as at 31 March 2006

Police force

Basic command unit

Police officers

Police officers per 100,000 population

All England forces

133,925

269

Staffordshire

2,302

219

Chase

420

131

North Staffordshire

298

137

Stoke on Trent

578

243

Trent Valley

412

150

Central Services

594

2n/a

1 Full-time equivalents that have been rounded to the nearest whole number. Due to rounding there may be an apparent discrepancy between totals and the sums of constituent items. Figures include those officers on career breaks or maternity/paternity leave.

2 Central Services are an administrative boundary, not a geographic one, and therefore do not have a resident population.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether any restrictions apply to applications to join the police from those with coeliac disease. (115362)

[holding answer 15 January 2007]: There are no general restrictions on applicants to the police service with coeliac disease.

Home Office Circular 59/2004 sets out the medical guidelines for police recruitment and further guidance was issued by the Home Office in August 2004 to Force Medical Advisors. Forces look at each case individually and assess it on its merits.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many police officers were employed in Essex in each of the last 10 years. (115864)

The available data are given in the table.

Police strength data are published annually in the Home Office Statistical Bulletin “Police Service Strength, England and Wales”. The latest publication (data as at 31 March 2006) can be downloaded from:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs06/hosb1306.pdf

Police officer strength (FTE)1 in Essex as at 31 March 1996 to 31 March 20062

1996

2,884

1997

2,961

1998

2,928

1999

2,891

2000

2,806

2001

2,897

2002

2,946

2003

2,989

2004

3,098

2005

3,190

2006

3,279

1 Full-time equivalent. All officers less staff on career breaks or maternity/paternity leave (comparable with previously published figures).

2 This table contains full-time equivalent figures that have been rounded to the nearest whole number. Because of rounding, there may be an apparent discrepancy between totals and the sums of the constituent items.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department which police forces in England and Wales have changed police injury pension payments so that payments are linked to national average earnings rather than police wages once injured officers reach compulsory retirement age (a) to all officers including those already receiving injury pensions who have reached compulsory retirement age, (b) to those receiving an injury pension but yet to reach compulsory retirement age and (c) only to those who were injured after the changes came into effect. (116123)

The information requested is not held centrally. The decision on whether to review a police injury pension is for the police authority paying it. The size of an injury award is determined in the first instance by reference to the recipient’s final pensionable salary and length of service as a police officer and his or her loss of earning capacity as a result of the injury. Where a police authority is reviewing the size of an injury pension the key question is whether the former officer’s loss of earning capacity as a result of the injury has altered. When a former officer reaches what would have been his or her compulsory retirement age in the police service, Home Office guidance advises police authorities, in the absence of any cogent evidence to the contrary in a particular case, to assess the loss of earning capacity by reference not to police pay but to national average earnings.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many black and minority ethnic Metropolitan Police officers applied for positions with the rank of Commander in the last two years; how many have been appointed to those positions; and if he will make a statement. (114934)

[holding answer 16 January 2007]: Statistics regarding applications for promotion are for the force concerned and are therefore a matter for the Metropolitan Police Service in this case.