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Sexual Health

Volume 455: debated on Thursday 25 January 2007

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how the £50 million advertising programme announced in 2004 to tackle the rise in sexual infections has been spent. (115223)

Announced as part of the Choosing Health White Paper, the Condom Essential Wear campaign was launched in November 2006. An integrated multi-media campaign, Condom Essential Wear targets some of the hardest to reach young people who are most at risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections.

To date approximately £4 million has been spent on a combination of television, radio, press and digital advertising as well as substantial public relations and partnership work with both commercial and not for profit stakeholders and the production of two websites, one consumer and one stakeholder facing. Funding for the next financial year is currently being considered.

Condom Essential Wear is one of three Government campaigns working to improve sexual health and reduce instances of teenage pregnancy, complementing the Department for Education and Skills campaigns, R U Thinking and Want Respect? Use a Condom. The total cost of this work across Government is £7.5 million this financial year.

In addition, £2.6 million has been spent by the Department to fund work by the Terrence Higgins Trust and the African HIV Policy Network.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much her Department spent on advertising sexual health services in (a) Hertfordshire and (b) England in each of the last five years. (115813)

Expenditure on sexual health advertising in England for the last five years including HIV public education, contraception awareness, prevention of sexually transmitted infections plus Helplines is set out in the following table. Information is not available for Hertfordshire centrally.

£ million

2002-03

6.600

2003-04

6.600

2004-05

6.600

2005-06

5.120

2006-07

7.300

This does not include the £1.61 million the Department gave to the Department for Education and Skills in 2006-07 to help fund its teenage pregnancy campaign ‘RU Thinking’ and its sexually transmitted infection campaign, ‘Want Respect? Use a Condom.’

Notes:

Contract for the Sexual Health Information Line, (formerly the National AIDS Helpline) is delivered as part of a contract which also includes Drinkline and Frank (substance misuse prevention).

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many girls (a) under the age of 15 years and (b) between the ages of 15 and 18 years (i) had abortions, (ii) gave birth and (iii) were diagnosed with sexually transmitted infections in each year between 1999 and 2005. (110806)

The available information is set out in the following tables.

Figures are provided on number of conceptions leading to maternities and abortions for girls aged under 15 and 15-18 from 1999 to 2004 (latest year for which figures are available) so that meaningful comparisons can be made on number of abortions and maternities that occur each year by age of woman.

Conceptions leading to maternities and abortions by age, resident in England and Wales, 1999 to 2004

Conceptions total

Conceptions leading to a maternity

Conceptions leading to an abortion

1999

Under 15

2,272

959

1,313

15-18

66,383

39,968

26,415

2000

Under 15

2,288

951

1,337

15-18

65,241

38,668

26,573

2001

Under 15

2,290

908

1,382

15-18

64,446

37,411

27,035

2002

Under 15

2,248

868

1,380

15-18

65,613

38,388

27,225

2003

Under 15

2,222

804

1,418

15-18

66,550

38,674

27,876

2004

Under 15

2,091

777

1,314

15-18

67,480

39,221

28,259

Total diagnoses of selected sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in genito-urinary medicine clinics; among females aged under 15 and 15-19, United Kingdom, 1999 to 2005

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

Females Under 15

447

411

498

533

547

531

576

Females 15-191

25,447

27,965

30,217

32,695

35,495

37,579

38,389

1 Data are available for age group 15-19 rather than 15-18.

Note:

Selected STIs include: infectious syphilis, uncomplicated gonorrhoea, anogenital herpes simplex (first attack), anogenital warts (first attack) and uncomplicated chlamydial infection.

Source:

KC60 returns, Health Protection Agency.