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Care Homes: Hygiene

Volume 457: debated on Tuesday 6 March 2007

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many care homes did not comply with minimum infection control standards in each of the last three years in each region in England. (124662)

[holding answer 2 March 2007]: I am informed by the Chair of the Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) that the information requested is as shown in the tables.

Performance of care homes against national minimum standards1 for hygiene and infection control by region

As at 31 March 2006

Hygiene and infection control standard not met

Region

Number

Percentage

East Midlands

237

15.7

Eastern

337

19.0

London

382

19.9

North East

163

17.6

North West

369

16.8

South East

714

20.5

South West

463

18.5

West Midlands

620

33.3

Yorkshire and Humberside

364

22.0

Total no meeting standard

3,649

20.5

As at 31 March 2005

Hygiene and infection control standard not met

Region

Number

Percentage

East Midlands

299

19.1

Eastern

440

24.4

London

476

24.3

North East

200

20.7

North West

490

21.4

South East

823

23.1

South West

581

22.3

West Midlands

752

39.2

Yorkshire and Humberside

396

23.2

Total not meeting standard

4,457

24.3

As at 31 March 2004

Hygiene and infection control standard not met

Region

Number

Percentage

East Midlands

454

28.8

Eastern

500

28.3

London

599

31.1

North East

235

24.4

North West

699

28.9

South East

931

26.2

South West

747

27.9

West Midlands

851

43.3

Yorkshire and Humberside

523

30.0

Total not meeting standard

5,539

29.8

Notes: 1. The national minimum standards (NMS) referred to are: Standard 26: NMS—care homes for older people. Standard 30: NMS—care homes for adults aged 18 to 65. 2. The figures and percentages shown are for all care homes.

Where it is considered that standards on infection control have not been met and that a regulation has been breached, CSCI may require the situation to be remedied within a set time. If there is no acceptable response to a warning letter, or if it is considered that there is a serious risk to service users, CSCI may consider issuing a statutory requirement notice. The notice clearly states what legal requirement is unmet, the corrective action which must be taken and stipulates the date—which will be no more than three months hence—by which the requirement must be met.

To ensure requirements are complied with, CSCI has an escalating tariff of enforcement options. These are included in its enforcement guidance, which is published on the CSCI website at:

www.csci.org.uk/care_professional/service__providers/guidance/guidance_for_all_service_provi/new__enforcement_policy_now__ava.aspx