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Accident and Emergency Departments

Volume 458: debated on Monday 12 March 2007

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many attendances there were at type 1 accident and emergency departments in each quarter since the quarter ending June 1997; and how many patients were admitted to hospital through type 1 accident and emergency departments in each quarter. (123065)

Full information is not available in the format requested. The information available is in the following table.

Quarter

Attendances at all types of accident and emergency (A and E) department

Attendances at type 1 A and E departments

Admissions via type 1 A and E departments

1997-98

14,364,146

1998-99

14,280,388

1999-2000

14,629,025

2000-01

14,293,307

2001-02

1

3,633,823

2

3,685,719

3

3,443,924

4

3,340,876

2002-03

1

3,740,076

3,085,850

2

3,746,866

3,095,650

565,743

3

3,435,018

2,882,500

574,983

4

3,469,562

2,930,874

583,491

2003-04

1

4,132,497

3,217,931

584,987

2

4,347,584

3,281,186

604,515

3

4,027,622

3,106,667

637,406

4

4,009,142

3,059,698

640,840

2004-05

1

4,502,578

3,377,850

651,785

2

4,556,695

3,381,219

673,452

3

4,374,927

3,257,398

705,901

4

4,402,980

3,249,353

724,814

2005-06

1

4,859,578

3,520,931

719,644

2

4,744,255

3,403,089

702,254

3

4,605,971

3,346,995

736,518

4

4,549,360

3,282,671

733,343

2006-07

1

4,891,724

3,509,770

722,342

2

4,892,182

3,493,340

737,543

3

4,559,139

3,307,210

754,449

Notes:

1. Prior to Q1 (April to June) 2001-02, A and E attendance data were only collected annually and as a total for types of A and E department. At this time, this did not include walk-in centres.

2. Attendances at A and E departments broken down by A and E type were first collected in Q1 (April to June) 2002-03.

3. From Q1 (April to June) 2003-04, attendances at walk-in centres were included in attendance information for all types of A and E department. Walk-in centres are considered to be a type 3 A and E service.

4. Admissions via A and E departments were first collected in Q2 2002-03, for type 1 A and E departments.

Source:

QMAE dataset, KH09 dataset, Department of Health

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many attendances at type 1 accident and emergency departments there were in each year since 1997, broken down by NHS organisation. (123123)

The information is not available in the format requested.

The available information has been placed in the Library.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent assessment she has made of the average cost of providing care for a patient who has been admitted to hospital via a type 1 accident and emergency department. (123149)

Cost data collected from the national health service does not distinguish between different admission methods.

We are therefore unable to identify separately the costs of providing care for patients admitted to hospital via a type 1 accident and emergency department.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment she has made of the emergency spell differential tariff rate in controlling levels of emergency admissions. (123150)

There has not been an assessment of the emergency spell differential tariff rate in controlling levels of emergency admissions. The differential tariff is a method of managing financial risk to commissioners and providers associated with emergency admissions, and not a method of controlling emergency admission levels.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 2 February 2007, Official Report, column 543W, on accident and emergency departments, what measures she uses to assess the critical size of a hospital; using these methods, if she will define the critical size of a hospital; and what the evidential basis was for the statement that a consensus is emerging on the critical size of a hospital. (123741)

There is no central criterion or measure of a critical size of hospital as it will depend on local circumstances. However, we would expect that population demographics are one factor that the local national health service would consider in ensuring the provision of appropriate services, including accident and emergency facilities, to meet people’s needs

The increasing consensus among professional bodies that a critical size of hospital is required to ensure that specialist facilities are available to treat all patients with emergency needs safely is evidenced through a number of publications that such bodies have produced in the past.