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Alcoholic Drinks: Children

Volume 458: debated on Thursday 22 March 2007

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many admissions to hospital with an alcohol-related diagnosis via accident and emergency departments involving children under the age of 18 years there were in (a) the former Norfolk, Suffolk and Cambridgeshire Strategic Health Authority area, (b) the East of England Strategic Health Authority area, (c) the West Suffolk Hospital NHS Trust area and (d) the Suffolk Primary Care Trust area in each year since 1997. (127620)

The following table shows the number of all diagnosis count of finished in-year admission episodes for children aged 17 and under, admitted via accident and emergency (A&E) departments for an alcohol related illness, by patients, primary care trust (PCT)/strategic health authority (SHA) of residence and West Suffolk Hospital NHS Trust covering the period 1997-98 to 2005-06. This is the latest data available.

Admission method: emergency: via A&E services, including the casualty department of the provider; or Emergency: other means, including patients who arrive via the A&E department of another provider

Norfolk, Suffolk and Cambridgeshire SHA of residence

East of England SHA area of residence1

Suffolk PCT area of residence2

West Suffolk Hospital NHS Trust

1997-98

208

467

58

17

1998-99

188

410

55

8

1999-2000

212

487

57

16

2000-01

207

432

66

18

2001-02

196

458

83

18

2002-03

196

440

61

15

2003-04

235

498

83

29

2004-05

258

538

85

37

2005-06

242

485

50

22

1 East of England SHA area includes the following:

Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire SHA;

Essex SHA; and

Norfolk, Suffolk and Cambridgeshire SHA.

2 Suffolk PCT area includes the following:

Suffolk Coastal PCT;

Ipswich PCT;

Central Suffolk PCT; and

Suffolk West PCT.

Notes:

Finished in-year admissions.

A finished in-year admission is the first period of in-patient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider, excluding admissions beginning before 1 April at the start of the data year. Please note that admissions do not represent the number of in-patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year.

PCT and SHA data quality

PCT and SHA data was added to historic data-years in the HES database using 2002-03 boundaries, as a one-off exercise in 2004. The quality of the data on PCT of treatment and SHA of treatment is poor in 1996-97, 1997-98 and 1998-99, with over a third of all finished episodes having missing values in these years. Data quality of PCT of general practitioner (GP) practice and SHA of GP practice in 1997-98 and 1998-99 is also poor, with a high proportion missing values where practices changed or ceased to exist. There is less change in completeness of the residence-based fields over time, where the majority of unknown values are due to missing postcodes on birth episodes. Users of time series analysis including these years need to be aware of these issues in their interpretation of the data.

All diagnoses count of episodes

These figures represent a count of all finished in year admission episodes where the diagnosis was mentioned in any of the 14 (seven prior to 2002-03) diagnosis fields in a HES record.

Diagnosis (primary diagnosis)

The primary diagnosis is the first of up to 14 (7 prior to 2002-03) diagnosis fields in the HES data set and provides the main reason why the patient was in hospital.

Secondary diagnoses

As well as the primary diagnosis, there are up to 13 (6 prior to 2002-03) secondary diagnosis fields in HES that show other diagnoses relevant to the episode of care.

Alcohol related diagnoses: ICD-10 codes

F10 Mental and behavioural disorders due to use of alcohol;

K70 Alcoholic liver disease;

T51 Toxic effect of alcohol

Data quality

HES are compiled from data sent by over 300 NHS PCTs in England. The Information Centre for Health and Social Care liaises closely with these organisations to encourage submission of complete and valid data and seeks to minimise inaccuracies and the effect of missing and invalid data via HES processes. While this brings about improvement over time, some shortcomings remain.

Source:

Hospital Episodes Statistics (HES), The Information Centre for Health and Social Care.