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Children: Poverty

Volume 459: debated on Tuesday 1 May 2007

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many children were living in a household with neither parent in employment in (a) Jarrow constituency, (b) South Tyneside, (c) the North East and (d) the UK in each year since 1997. (131281)

The available information is in the following tables.

Children in workless households—UK

Number (Thousand)

Spring

1997

2,214

1998

2,216

1999

2,156

2000

1,980

2001

1,915

2002

1,978

2003

1,892

2004

1,861

2005

1,814

2006

1,744

Children in workless households—North East (spring quarter)

Number (Thousand)

Q2

1997

123

1998

133

1999

135

2000

118

2001

108

2002

96

2003

122

2004

105

2005

89

2006

83

Note: Because of the small sample size, the data provided above should be considered as indicative rather than exact. Source: Labour Force Survey, Spring 2006.

To measure progress relating to children in workless households (CIWH) the Department uses the Household Labour Force Survey (HLFS). However, it is not possible to disaggregate this data below Government office region.

The information in the following table uses administrative data to provide the number of children dependent on workless benefits in the Jarrow constituency and South Tyneside. A timeline has been provided from 2004 onwards, the first year where the data are available.

Number of children in workless households

April

2004

2005

2006

Jarrow parliamentary constituency

4,145

3,840

3,585

South Tyneside local authority

9,020

8,405

7,895

Notes:

1. The official definition of a CIWH is a child aged under 16 in a working-age household where no adult works. The administrative data are an inexact proxy for this as they chart all children under 16 in a working-age household who have at least one parent claiming workless benefits (IS, JSA, IB/SDA, and PC). 2. The administrative data do not incorporate in their definition workless adults who do not claim benefits. The definition used also differs from the standard CIWH definition in that it includes children in households with both working and non-working adults, as opposed to a household with no working adults. 3. Furthermore adults working part-time may also be eligible for IS, and such claimants may be included in the administrative data.

4. The information on those claiming income-related social security benefit is not available.

Source: DWP Information Directorate.