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Written Answers

Volume 461: debated on Thursday 21 June 2007

Written Answers to Questions

Thursday 21 June 2007

Culture, Media and Sport

Casino Advisory Panel: Expenditure

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what the total expenditure was of the Casino Advisory Panel. (144724)

When the Casino Advisory Panel submitted its final report to the Secretary of State on 30 January 2007 its total costs were approximately £400,000.

Gambling

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what the total cost was of the Budd report on gambling. (144722)

Full details of the total cost are not readily available. However, the cost to DCMS of publication of the report of the Gambling Review Body (the Budd Report) was £12,200, as set out in the answer given by my hon. Friend the Member for Pontypridd (Dr. Howells) to the hon. Member for South Suffolk (Mr. Yeo) on 10 April 2002, Official Report, column 332W.

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what total costs were associated with the White Paper, A Safe Bet for Success—Modernising Britain's Gambling Laws. (144723)

Full details of the total cost are not readily available. However, the cost to DCMS of publication of the White Paper was £12,000, as set out in the answer given by my hon. Friend the Member for Pontypridd (Dr. Howells) to the hon. Member for South Suffolk (Mr. Yeo) on 10 April 2002, Official Report, column 332W.

Olympic Games: Greater London

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport (1) what recent discussions (a) she and (b) her Department have had with companies which have bid for the utilities contracts for the Olympic games; (144109)

(2) when (a) she and (b) a Minister in her Department last had a meeting with (i) Thames Water and (ii) EDF energy to discuss the utilities (A) contracts and (B) requirements for the Olympic games.

The utilities contracts for the Stratford city and Olympic games sites are being procured under a commercially confidential process by the Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA). To maximise the commercial benefits of negotiation the names of those organisations that have submitted a bid are not widely known within the ODA and have not been released externally.

I can confirm that no DCMS Minister has held meetings with Thames Water, EDF energy or any of the companies which have bid for the utilities contracts for the Olympic games to discuss contracts and the requirements for the games.

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport (1) which bodies will be involved in making the decision on the contractors and companies which are awarded the utilities contracts for the Olympic games; (144111)

(2) what input the Mayor of London will have into the decision making process for the utilities contracts for the Stratford city and Olympic games site.

The utilities contracts for the Stratford city and Olympic games sites are being procured under a commercially confidential process by the Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA).

Tenders are currently being sought and evaluated by the ODA, and in due course their recommendations for award will be considered by the Olympic Projects Review Group (OPRG), which includes representation from the Greater London authority (GLA).

The OPRG may then make recommendations to Ministers for formal approval to award the contracts.

Sports: Governing Bodies

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what criteria she uses to decide which Olympic governing bodies of sport receive funding from her Department. (144596)

Decisions regarding the criteria for and funding of Olympic governing bodies of sport are made by the Sports Councils, not by Ministers.

UK Sport is charged with delivering UK success at the Olympic and Paralympic games. To achieve this it takes a ‘no compromise’ approach to its investment, targeting resources and activity at those athletes and sports deemed most capable of medal winning performances. Individual sports are allocated their funding through the UK Sport World Class Pathway programme, with the amount determined by a formula that includes results from the previous games and current rankings, as well as future medal potential and the identification of talent.

In addition, some Olympic sports are funded by Home Country Sports Councils in pursuit of their wider aims and objectives; for example, increasing participation in sport. In England, Sport England provides funding to 21 Olympic sports to support delivery of their four-year strategic plans at community level. The sports apply the funding they receive to deliver against a range of key performance indicators (KPIs). These KPIs include increasing the number of accredited clubs, the number of club members and the numbers of coaches and volunteers working within their sport.

Furthermore, as a part of the joint DfES/DCMS National School Sport strategy, Sport England also funds a total of 18 Olympic sports to support delivery of school club links and volunteer and leadership opportunities for young people.

Wales

Departments: Home Working

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales how many people in his Department have been allowed to work from home for part of the week in the last 12 months; and if he will make a statement on his Department’s policy on home working. (143874)

The Wales Office values diversity and accommodates different work patterns including home working.

Over the past year a number of staff have followed a flexible working pattern, working the occasional day or half day at home, whether to suit personal circumstances or to assist in the completion of a specific task. One member of Wales Office staff has a more formal arrangement for home working.

Departments: Manpower

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales how many people granted (a) temporary part-time, (b) temporary full-time, (c) permanent part-time and (d) permanent full-time contracts of employment in his Department in each of the last three years were (i) male, (ii) female, (iii) registered disabled and (iv) aged 55 years or over. (143904)

The Wales Office does not grant contracts of employment. Wales Office staff are either on loan from the Welsh Assembly Government or employed by the Ministry of Justice.

Scotland

Departments: Pay

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what percentage of his Department's staff received a bonus in (a) 2006 and (b) 2007. (142716)

Elections: Ballot Papers

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland pursuant to the answer of 12 June 2007, Official Report, columns 921-22W, on elections: ballot papers, (1) who chaired the Electronic Counting Project Board that negotiated the contract to deliver an electronic counting service; (144350)

(2) if he will place in the Library a copy of the contract negotiated with DRS for delivery of an electronic counting service, redacted as necessary;

(3) which individuals were members of the Electronic Counting Project Board that negotiated the contract to deliver an electronic counting service.

The Electronic Counting Project Board was chaired by the Scottish Executive's Head of Local Governance and Licensing Division.

We do not intend placing a copy of the electronic counting contract with DRS in the Library at present but we will review this after completion of the Electoral Commission's independent review of the May elections. We have made it clear that Mr Ron Gould and his review team will have access to all the documents they require, including those relating to e-counting.

The members of the Electronic Counting Project Board were: the Scottish Executive’s Head of Local Governance and Licensing Division, an official from the Scottish Executive's Local Democracy Team, the E-counting Project Manager, the Scotland Office's Head of Elections and Social Policy Branch and the Scotland Office’s Elections Policy Advisor, the Returning Officer for East Renfrewshire, the Deputy Returning Officer for Edinburgh City Council, Head of Elections at DRS Data Services Limited, Project Manager from DRS Data Services Limited, and a representative of Electoral Reform Services.

House of Commons Commission

House of Commons Commission: Manpower

To ask the hon. Member for North Devon, representing the House of Commons Commission pursuant to the answer of 20 April 2007, Official Report, column 1060W, on House of Commons Commission: manpower, if he will list the 85 posts which carry salaries in excess of £60,000; and what the salary is of each post. (144167)

Information about senior staff with salaries in excess of £60,277 was placed in the Library in January in response to a question from the hon. Member for West Chelmsford (Mr. Burns), 11 January 2007, Official Report, column 652W. I will write to the hon. Member with further details. Current pay ranges for all staff can be found on the parliamentary intranet.

Parking

To ask the hon. Member for North Devon, representing the House of Commons Commission how many car parking spaces there are on the Commons part of the parliamentary estate (a) in the underground car park and (b) elsewhere. (144356)

A total of 600 car parking spaces are available on the parliamentary estate, nearly 500 of which are in the New Palace Yard multi-storey underground car park.

Smoking

To ask the hon. Member for North Devon, representing the House of Commons Commission on what date the Commission last discussed implementation of the forthcoming ban on smoking in enclosed public spaces on the parliamentary estate; and if he will make a statement. (145052)

As the minutes published on the internet http://www.parliament.uk/about_commons/house_of_commons_commission_hccfm120307.cfm show, the Commission discussed smoking on 12 March 2007. The policy on the subject is set out in a written answer to the hon. Member for Aberdeen, North (Mr. Doran) on 20 March 2008, Official Report, column 757W.

The Health Act 2006 introduces a ban on smoking in workplaces and enclosed or substantially enclosed public places from 1 July 2007. While the Act does not formally apply on the parliamentary estate, the Commission, on the advice of the Administration Committee, has decided that the House should comply with the principles of the legislation, as it is not desirable that those who work on or visit the parliamentary estate should be treated differently in this respect than in other workplaces and public places. The Commission recognises, however, that many who work on the estate are unavoidably present for long periods, particularly when the House is sitting. It is therefore desirable to make reasonable provision for those who wish to smoke to do so, provided that the health and safety of other users of the estate is not adversely affected.

With these principles in mind, the Commission has decided that smoking should cease to be permitted from 1 July 2007 in all internal areas of the House of Commons estate, including in bars and private offices. From that date smoking will, however, be permitted in four designated external areas: the Terrace, Commons Court (North West corner), North Terrace (between Portcullis House and Norman Shaw South), and in a designated area on the west side of Canon Row courtyard. Cigarette receptacles will be provided in these areas. “No Smoking” signs will be displayed at entrances to the buildings.

International Development

Asylum: Iraq

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development whether his Department has increased its presence in (a) Syria, (b) Jordan and (c) Egypt to assist Iraqi refugees; and if he will make a statement. (143780)

We are very concerned about the humanitarian situation in Iraq and the increasing numbers of people who have been displaced due to ongoing violence.

DFID has not increased its presence in Syria, Jordan or Egypt in response to the refugee crisis. We continue to work closely with international humanitarian partners to ensure agencies are adequately resourced and equipped to respond to needs such as food, water, shelter and medical assistance.

To date, we have contributed £1.5 million to the UN high commission for refugees' (UNHCR) appeal to help refugees in neighbouring countries. This was part of a £10 million package, which we have provided so far this year, to help vulnerable people inside Iraq and those displaced to other countries in the region. In total, DFID has provided £125 million in humanitarian assistance to Iraq since 2003.

Democracy: Expenditure

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much his Department spent on projects promoting democracy in each of the last three years. (142608)

DFID’s support to democracy programmes is part of our broader approach to good governance. One of the components of good governance is an open and transparent political system with strong political institutions. This means our democracy work includes support to civil society to improve their capacity to hold Governments to account; initiatives to build accountability into our health and education programmes to improve Government responsiveness to poor people; and work to strengthen political systems more broadly, including popular participation in the decision-making process. The latter includes direct support to elections and Parliaments.

In total, DFID's direct bilateral spend on governance programmes was £212 million in 2004-05, £322 million in 2005-06 and £286 million in 2006-07. Within this DFID spent £14 million directly on democratic elections in 2004-5, £17.1 million in 2005-06 and £15.5 million in 2006-7. Over the next five years, our support to governance will include an additional £100 million for the governance and transparency fund.

The aforementioned figures do not include our support to the UN, EU and other multilateral organisations some of which is used to fund governance and democracy promotion programmes. However, DFID does not hold details of what proportion of these contributions were used to assist with the promotion of democracy.

Note that the figures for 2006-07 are provisional estimates only.

Departments: Homeworking

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many people in his Department have been allowed to work from home for part of the week in the last 12 months; and if he will make a statement on his Department's policy on home working. (143880)

DFID does not keep records of the number of home workers.

However, DFID operates a ‘one machine’ policy under which each member of staff chooses to be equipped with either a desktop computer or, subject to the approval of their Head of Department, a laptop computer. The laptop option enables staff to work from home or at other remote locations while travelling on behalf of the Department. Currently, 1,750 staff have been issued with laptops.

DFID is committed to improving work/life balance and accommodates a wide range of different work patterns including the use of home and remote working. DFID’s policy is set out both in the staff handbook, which is available to all staff electronically, and in two booklets, “Flexible Working”, and “Remote Working” which staff receive on appointment. In a recent management survey, 84 per cent. of staff strongly believed that their line managers actively support flexible working.

Departments: Manpower

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many people granted (a) temporary part-time, (b) temporary full-time, (c) permanent part-time and (d) permanent full-time contracts of employment in his Department in each of the last three years were (i) male, (ii) female, (iii) registered disabled and (iv) aged 55 years or over. (143899)

DFID employs both UK-based civil servants and staff engaged overseas on local terms and conditions of service. I have provided a breakdown of the data for the categories requested for both amalgamated groups in the following tables. Table 1 shows all contracts awarded during the years 2004-06, inclusive, broken down by gender. Table 2 shows the same breakdown across the categories for those in the over 55 age range. During the same period seven staff with registered disabilities were awarded contracts. (One temporary, six permanent—of which one was part-time).

Table 1

Perm

Full-time

Part-time

Temp

Full-time

Part-time

Total

Totals per year

2004

Male

167

167

30

29

1

197

Female

182

173

9

30

30

212

409

2005

Male

108

106

2

16

16

124

Female

97

86

1

22

22

119

243

2006

Male

83

81

2

13

12

1

96

Female

91

84

7

21

20

1

112

208

Total employees

728

132

860

860

Table 2: Age over 55

Perm

Full-time

Part-time

Temp

Full-time

Part- time

Total

Totals per year

2004

Male

5

5

4

4

9

Female

4

4

4

13

2005

Male

5

4

1

2

1

7

Female

1

1

1

8

2006

Male

3

3

1

1

4

Female

2

2

2

6

Total employees

20

7

27

27

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what percentage of staff in his Department are (a) male, (b) female, (c) registered disabled and (d) aged 55 or over. (143916)

DFID employs both UK-based civil servants and staff engaged overseas on local terms and conditions of service. The following table shows the information which is available for both groups and for DFID as a whole. Information on gender, disability and age are all provided on a voluntary basis, and is incomplete for those staff engaged locally overseas. The response rate on disability in particular is very low. The percentages quoted are therefore based upon the numbers where we do have the relevant information, and the total percentage with a disability is for only our UK-based staff.

Percentage

Male

Female

Disabled

Aged 55 +

UK-based

50

50

3

12

Locally engaged

50

50

n/a

19

Total

50

50

3

14

n/a = Not available.

Departments: Official Visits

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development which destinations he visited in an official capacity between 17 May and 17 June. (144548)

Departments: Pay

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many staff in his Department received bonus payments in 2006-07; what proportion of the total workforce they represented; what the total amount of bonuses paid was; what the largest single payment was; and if he will make a statement. (143099)

The following tables give the number of bonuses awarded to DFID staff in 2006-07. All bonus payments are non-pensionable.

Bonuses awarded to DFID senior civil servants (SCS)

2006-07

Number of awards

66

Percentage of total SCS workforce

78

Total cost (£)

389,100

Largest single payment (£)

12,000

Bonuses awarded to DFID staff in grades below the SCS

2006-07

Number of awards

1,020

Percentage of total HCS workforce below the SCS

62

Total cost (£)

558,233

Largest single payment (£)

1,150

Departments: Remploy

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what (a) services and (b) products his Department has procured from Remploy in the last 12 months; and at what cost. (143792)

The Department for International Development (DFID) has had no contracts with Remploy in the last 12 months.

Gaza: Politics and Government

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what assessment he has made of the humanitarian situation of the civilian population in Gaza following the takeover of the area's administration by Hamas; and if he will make a statement. (144328)

The United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) makes regular assessments of the humanitarian situation in the Gaza Strip. Between 9 and 13 June, OCHA reported that 110 Palestinians were killed and over 550 injured. However, relative calm has now returned. People are out in the streets and shops are open.

The major concern among humanitarian agencies now is the movement of people and goods into and out of Gaza. Israel has allowed some humanitarian supplies to enter. Shortages of basic food supplies are likely to occur within days unless access is restored for private traders. The UK Government have called for the re-opening of the Kami crossing.

Humanitarian Aid: Gaza

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what assessment he has made of the impact of the recent violence in Gaza on the operations of the UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestinian Refugees in the Near East; and if he will make a statement. (144329)

70 per cent. of Gaza’s population, around 1 million people, are registered as refugees and are eligible for support from the UNRWA. On 13 June the UNRWA suspended all operations in Gaza except for essential medical services and emergency food distributions. This followed the killing of two of its staff in intra-Palestinian violence. On 17 June, the UNRWA returned to full operations, but warned that its support programmes depended on regular humanitarian supplies through Gaza’s borders with Israel.

Humanitarian Aid: Sri Lanka

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what recent reports he has received on the murder of aid workers in Sri Lanka; and what guidance his Department is making available for UK aid workers in Sri Lanka. (144482)

We have received several representations from the British and Sri Lankan NGO communities about the murder of two Red Cross workers on 2 June and the deaths of 17 workers from a French NGO in August 2006. We have raised the issue of humanitarian security with the Sri Lankan Government repeatedly and pressed for the perpetrators of these appalling crimes to be brought to justice.

The UK advises British nationals, including aid workers, against all travel to the north and east of Sri Lanka. Ultimately aid workers and the agencies that employ them are responsible for their own security. Staff at the British High Commission in Colombo meet representatives of the British NGO community on a monthly basis to share information on security and other operational issues. Aid workers are also encouraged to register their presence in Sri Lanka with the British High Commission. Where appropriate, the FCO will support British nationals who are caught up in conflict, civil unrest and natural catastrophes.

Iraq: Internally Displaced Persons

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the answer to the hon. Member for Berwickshire, Roxburgh and Selkirk of 7 June 2007, official report, column 685W, on Iraq: internally displaced persons, what form he expects the Iraqi Government's lead role in supporting Iraqi refugees outside Iraq to take; and if he will make a statement. (143949)

The most important thing that needs to happen in Iraq is an end to the spiralling violence responsible for the deteriorating humanitarian situation and increasing levels of displacement. The Government of Iraq have put dealing with security at the top of their agenda and we will continue to support them. Furthermore, it has primary responsibility to ensure the protection of its citizens.

At the April UNHCR Conference in Geneva, the Government of Iraq made a commitment to take the lead in providing support and security for their citizens, including those who have fled the country. In the first phase, they pledged $25 million to finance the establishment of migration offices in Jordan and Syria. These offices will support vulnerable Iraqis and help alleviate the burden of the influx of refugees on host countries. We will continue to press them to step up their response to the situation and develop their policy on how best to provide assistance.

Mozambique: Health Services

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what support his Department has provided to health systems in each of the last five years in (a) Mozambique and (b) China; and what the (i) objectives, (ii) time scales and (iii) funding were of such programmes. (144348)

DFID has actively supported the health systems in Mozambique for a number of years. DFID Mozambique provided support to the Technical Planning Unit within the Ministry of Health to facilitate development of a national health plan for the period 2000-05. DFID also funded the HIV/AIDS and Maternal Health Programme (2001-07) which aims to increase access to and use of good quality reproductive and sexual health services. DFID funding of the Essential Medicines programme (2000-06) aimed to improve the availability and rational use of essential medicines by strengthening procurement and distribution systems.

DFID is currently supporting the development of a Sustainable Distribution System for Insecticide Treated Nets (ITNs) for Malaria Prevention. The programme, which has a total allocated budget of £8.6 million, started in 2005 and is due to run until 2010. It builds upon the lessons learnt as a result of a pilot Malaria Prevention and Treatment project. DFID recently agreed a new five-year programme of support to the Ministry of Health for £3.7 million per annum. In 2006, DFID also signed a five-year £215 million programme of direct support to the budget of the Government of Mozambique, which helps provide additional funding for health systems. The total amount of bilateral DFID expenditure in the health sector in Mozambique is shown in the following table. This includes a notional proportion of DFID’s general budget support.

DFID bilateral expenditure on health in Mozambique, 2002-03 to 2006-07

Expenditure (£ million)

2002-03

10.2

2003-04

13.3

2004-05

16.3

2005-06

15.9

2006-07

111. 9

1 Provisional.

DFID has been working in the health sector in China since 1999. The focus has been on helping the Chinese Government to control HIV and AIDS, increasing the detection and cure rate for people suffering from tuberculosis, and reforming the health system so that poor people receive basic health services. The total amount of bilateral DFID expenditure in the health sector in China is shown in the following table.

DFID bilateral expenditure on health in China, 2002-03 to 2006-07

Expenditure (£ million)

2002-03

12.6

2003-04

11.1

2004-05

10.5

2005-06

13.0

2006-07

111. 9

1 Provisional.

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development if he will take steps to facilitate the provision of health care free at the point of access in (a) Mozambique and (b) China. (144349)

It is for national Governments to decide their own policies in relation to user fees in health. However, because of our own UK experience and that of developing countries, DFID is committed to helping countries that want to remove charges at the point of delivery. The recent White Paper commits DFID to help partner Governments abolish user fees for basic health services and help them tackle other barriers to access, including discrimination against women.

DFID is working with the Government of China to facilitate the provision of free (or substantially subsidised by the Government) primary health care. China is formulating a major health policy to address inequity in the health system, of which free primary health care for all is likely to be an important feature. Meanwhile various health insurance programmes for urban and rural residents will be improved to provide better financial risk protection and reduce out-of-pocket payments on in-patient services.

DFID has supported China on rural and urban health and health policy capacity building since 1999. Our large and well designed pilots have provided evidence to Chinese policy makers on rural and urban health reform, which is now being used to inform the development of the new policies.

In Mozambique, services are already formally free for malaria, TB, HIV treatment, maternal health services and immunisation for children. The Government of Mozambique have already made a public commitment to look at the case for removing fees, at least for primary health care. DFID is now working closely with the Government of Mozambique to consider the practical implications of removing the remaining user fees. This includes: studying the expected implications for demand; considering how systems will need to be reinforced to support the change; and preventing illegal charging. If the Government of Mozambique make a decision to abolish more fees, DFID will support this, including through our continued financial support to the sector.

Overseas Aid: Corruption

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development on what occasions and from whom the UK has sought the return of monies misappropriated from UK aid programmes. (140735)

DFID is committed to ensuring that its resources are used only for the purposes intended. The Department’s Anti-Fraud and Corruption Policy aims to ensure that resources lost through misappropriation are minimised, and that appropriate action is taken to recover such funds. A specialist Fraud Response Unit within DFID’s internal audit function coordinates DFID’s response to allegations of fraud and corruption, and provides support to management to strengthen systems and processes to prevent or detect future losses.

Where a loss relates to activities which are being managed on DFID’s behalf by an NGO, an international organisation or a similar partner with whom DFID has an ongoing relationship, the partner concerned will usually be required to absorb the loss and to complete delivery of the agreed development goals without additional DFID funding. Before agreeing to this course of action, DFID will first require adequate assurance that the weaknesses in the partner’s systems which allowed the losses to occur have been addressed. In other cases, the Department’s practice is normally to seek the repayment of the monies which have been misappropriated.

Where DFID cannot obtain the necessary assurance that a partner’s arrangements for preventing fraud and corruption have been strengthened, and hence that UK taxpayers’ monies will be properly safeguarded, future funding may be withheld or the relationship with the partner may be terminated.

The following table lists the cases, for the financial years 2004-05 to 2006-07 inclusive, where the UK has sought the return of monies misappropriated from UK aid programmes. This includes instances where there has been full or partial repayment to DFID of misappropriated funds, those where the partner organisation managing the activities on DFID’s behalf has absorbed the losses itself, and those where no recovery could be achieved.

Location

Party from whom return was sought/circumstances of loss

2004-05

Uganda

Bank: Unidentified culprit cashed cheque claiming to be working for consultants. Funds recovered in full from bank.

2004-05

The Gambia

NGO: NGO suffered an internal fraud in the Gambia. Individuals were prosecuted and some funds returned.

2004-05

Caribbean

NGO: Misappropriation, including diversion of project salaries funded by DFID. Full amount recovered.

2004-05

DR Congo

International organisation: Financial irregularities within DFID-funded project. Audit undertaken by external auditor. Full funds recovered.

2004-05

UK

Private individual’s estate: Pension still being claimed after staff member’s death. Money refunded in full.

2004-05

UK

Credit card provider: Unauthorised use of credit card. Full refund made by card company

2005-06

UK

Staff member: Made false claim for payment of travel time. Recovered in full.

2005-06

Rwanda

Staff member: Theft of generators by DFID employee. Generators recovered, and employee dismissed.

2005-06

Malawi

Staff member: Cash received on project had not been banked. Staff member resigned and funds recovered in full.

2005-06

Liberia

Supplier: DFID contractor forging/stealing cheques. Company repaid the monies in full.

2005-06

Southern Africa

Staff members: Money stolen from office safe at project. Two staff dismissed and police notified. Funds recovered in full.

2005-06

Kenya

Contractor: Equipment misappropriated. Culprit absconded before police could act. No recovery possible.

2005-06

Malawi

NGO: NGO discovered that their PAYE contributions had been diverted to pay tax on the importation of cars. Court proceedings have been initiated but not concluded. Monies recovered in full.

2006-07

Kenya

NGO: Double billing of donors. Amounts recovered in full.

2006-07

Kenya

NGO: Procurement irregularities, with work being awarded to relatives at inflated costs. Full recovery.

2006-07

Kenya

NGO: Insecticide-treated nets were sold by staff in medical centres to be used as fishing nets. Some supplies were recovered, others written off. Police involved.

2006-07

UK

Private individual’s estate: Pension still being claimed after staff member’s death by a relative, who has since herself died. Some monies recovered from the estate and HMRC.

2006-07

Cambodia

International organisation: Cash/cheque fraud by an international organisation's employees. Some monies returned.

2006-07

Somalia

Local community: Misuse of funds on an Accountable Grant funded project. Community members found responsible and funds repaid in full.

2006-07

Malawi

NGO: Over-claiming of school fees by NGO staff member. Funds repaid in full.

2006-07

Ghana

Supplier: Private company had been using a phone number for which DFID paid the bills. Full recovery.

2006-07

Sudan

NGO: NGO identified a fraud on a DFID-funded project and has since repaid the loss in full.

During the same period, 2004-05 to 2006-07, DFID also had a smaller number of instances where misappropriation of UK funds could be proven but where effective recovery action was not practicable due to the particular circumstances of each case—for example, where the culprits could not be identified or subsequently absconded, or where the value of the loss was lower than the cost of any recovery action. For completeness, these cases are set out in the following table.

Location

Circumstances of loss

2004-05

UK

Payments intercepted in the mail.

2004-05

UK

Staff member tried to re-sell DFID-funded travel tickets.

2004-05

Guyana

NGO worker took unauthorised allowances.

2005-06

Iraq

Over-claiming of project-related salaries.

2005-06

Nigeria

Cash theft.

2005-06

Nepal

Burglary.

2005-06

Iraq

Loss of satellite telephone.

2005-06

Kenya

Equipment purchased without proper authority.

2006-07

Rwanda

Unauthorised use of vehicle.

Palestinians: EC Aid

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what proportion of the restored EU funding to the Palestinian Authority will be directed to (a) the West Bank and (b) Gaza; and if he will make a statement. (144361)

On 18 June, EU Foreign Ministers discussed the resumption of assistance to the Palestinian Authority. They concluded that the EU should develop the conditions for urgent practical and financial assistance. The EU has not yet decided how this will be delivered. However, we will wish to ensure that assistance addresses the needs of Palestinians in both Gaza and the West Bank.

Palestinians: International Assistance

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what changes are planned to the operation of the Temporary International Mechanism for the delivery of aid to the Palestinian people following recent events in Gaza; and if he will make a statement. (144360)

No decisions have yet been taken on changes to the Temporary International Mechanism (TIM) following recent events in Gaza. The TIM continues to provide support for the basic needs of Palestinians in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. The Quartet recently extended the TIM until the end of September 2007.

Tanzania: Overseas Aid

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what financial support has been given to the Presidential Parastatal Sector Reform Commission in Tanzania for (a) work in the area of water and sanitation and (b) other work in each year since 1994; on what dates technical assistance grants were given; what the aid funding was for each grant; and to whom consultancy contracts were awarded. (143944)

The Tanzanian Government established the Parastatal Sector Reform Commission (PSRC) in 1993 to reform and privatise loss-making public entities (including ports, railways and airlines). At the time, there were approximately 400 such entities, costing the Government US $100 million annually.

At the request of the Government of Tanzania, DFID provided a total of £7.1 million to the PSRC to support the divestiture of publicly-owned companies in Tanzania between 1992 and the end of our programme of support in March 2007.

DFID’s support helped to ensure that the privatisation process was implemented in a fair and transparent manner and that regulatory bodies were established to ensure privatised entities worked for the benefit of Tanzania. The assistance provided was used for the purposes of contracting advisory support for:

management of the privatisation process

broadening of share ownership—to afford Tanzanians greater opportunities to own shares in privatised entities

amendments to relevant enabling legislation and regulations, and supporting the development of suitable local regulatory capacity

Different companies were awarded contracts. All work was procured under prevailing Tanzanian Government procurement regulations. The grants provided were for:

Technical Assistance—total value of £6.1 million (from 1992-2007)

Development support—total value of £1 million (from 2003-07)

The contracts that were provided for work in the area of water and sanitation are set out in table 1 as follows.

Table 1: Contracts awarded for water and sanitation work

Date

Contractor

Purpose of work

Total value (£000)

2001

Adam Smith International

Conducting a water privatisation and regulatory study tour

55

2001

Clifford Chance

Provision of legal advice to DAWASA

1150

1997

John D. Davies

Provision of short-term advice on achieving an appropriate private sector participation arrangement for DAWASA

31

November 1997

GIBB East Africa Ltd

Facilitation of a DAWASA workshop on privatisation

16

Total

252

1 Part of the contract was denominated in US$.

The UK funded 10 contracts valued above £100,000 each in the period from 1992 to 2007 in support of PSRC. An additional 39 contracts of lesser value were awarded for smaller pieces of work—calculating the total value of these contracts would involve disproportionate cost. Table 2 sets out amounts and a description of the main grants and contractors.

Table 2: Contracts of £100,000 or more awarded in support of PSRC

Date

Contractor

Nature of assignment

Total value (£000)

1992-96

Devon Waide

Advisory support to PSRC

846

1998- 2000

Cezley Sampson

Provision of advice on reform, divestiture and restructuring

302

1998- 2002

PricewaterhouseCoopers (PWC)

Provision of Utilities adviser to PSRC

697

1999- 2000

Adam Smith International

Establishment of PSRC Information Unit and provision of public relations support

496

2001

GMA Capital Markets Ltd

Conducting a capital markets absorptive study

129

2001

Clifford Chance

Provision of legal consultancy for the privatisation of Air Tanzania Corporation

315

2002

Adam Smith International

Provision of lead advisory support

230

2002

Clifford Chance

Provision of legal advice for the privatisation of Air Tanzania Corporation

210

2002-05

PricewaterhouseCoopers (PWC)

Provision of Technical Adviser and Utilities Adviser

623

2006-07

PricewaterhouseCoopers (PWC)

Provision of Utilities adviser to PSRC

178

Total

4,026

Defence

Afghanistan: Peacekeeping Operations

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many (a) mines, (b) mortar rounds, (c) projectiles by calibre, (d) missiles and (e) air dropped weapons were expended by members of UK armed forces as part of the NATO deployment in Afghanistan in each of the last six months. (142850)

I am withholding the information as its disclosure would, or would be likely to prejudice the capability, effectiveness or security of the armed forces.

Aircraft Carriers: Procurement

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether the delay in the construction of the two new aircraft carriers for the UK has resulted in job losses at dockyards. (143442)

[holding answer 18 June 2007]: No date has been set for commencement of manufacture of the future aircraft carriers and there has, therefore, been no delay. The main investment decision will be taken when we are confident that we have a robust, affordable deal.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what assessment he has made of the impact on dockyards in the UK if the Government decide to collaborate with France in the construction of the proposed two new aircraft carriers for the UK; (143444)

(2) what talks have taken place with members of the aircraft carrier alliance on the involvement of France in the construction of the proposed two new aircraft carriers for the UK;

(3) what discussions there have been with trades unions about the involvement of France in the construction of the proposed two new aircraft carriers for the UK;

[holding answers 18 June 2007]: We have always stressed that co-operation with France through industry-to-industry links may offer potential benefits to both nations. This was covered most recently when my noble Friend the Minister of State for Defence Equipment and Support, Lord Drayson met with the trade unions and the Aircraft Carrier Alliance Chief Executive last month. It has been agreed with France that for co-operation to work, it must deliver cost savings and must do so without delaying UK or French programmes.

Armed Forces: Dental Services

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the duties are of each defence dental personnel role; how many hours per week those in each role are expected to devote to the provision of dental care; and how many patients those in each role saw in each of the last five years. (138790)

Armed Forces: Deployment

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the (a) location and (b) number of personnel was for each operational deployment in 1997. (119056)

Armed Forces: Housing

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much HM Treasury has passed to the Ministry of Defence from monies received from Annington Homes in connection with sales of former Ministry of Defence housing and land in (a) the UK and (b) Colchester. (121129)

These monies enter a consolidated general cash account and are not paid back to the Ministry of Defence directly by Her Majesty's Treasury.

Armed Forces: Pay

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many armed service personnel have received a tax-free bonus for service in (a) Iraq, (b) Afghanistan and (c) the Balkans since October 2006. (142594)

The information broken down by operational theatre is not held within legacy service pay systems and the new Joint Personnel Administration system in the format requested and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

As at 13 June 2007, some 46,333 armed forces personnel had received payment of the tax-free Operational Allowance. This figure includes payments to Army personnel for more than one operational tour and excludes payments after 31 March 2007 to deceased, discharged and special forces personnel for all three services.

Armoured Fighting Vehicles

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what research has been undertaken on the vertical and horizontal centre of gravity position of each of the various types of Land Rover used by the armed forces. (141041)

The Department examined centre of gravity issues for Wolf Land Rovers when the Bowman communication system was introduced. The suspension on vehicles fitted for radios and Weapons Mount Installation Kits was improved by the fitment of a rear anti roll bar, which improved the vehicle’s stability.

Snatch Land Rovers have also been assessed to examine the effects on stability and performance by the fitment of armour and the variety of potential load configurations.

The latest Land Rovers, like other vehicles procured by the MOD, were subject to rigorous assessment through a military validation and trials period, prior to acceptance into service.

Ballistic Missile Defence

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what contribution the UK has made to the study agreed at the NATO summit in Riga in 2006 on a collective alliance territorial missile defence system. (143941)

The missile defence feasibility study that was delivered to the NATO summit in 2006 was financed from NATO common funds to which the UK contributes. QinetiQ were part of the industrial consortium that undertook the work. In common with other NATO nations, the UK reviewed and commented upon the feasibility study, and contributes to the continuing discussions in NATO on the implications of missile defence for the alliance.

Bank of England

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether (a) Ministers and (b) officials in his Department have given authorisations in relation to monies (i) held in and (ii) transferred from a British Aerospace account at the Bank of England since May 1997; and if he will make a statement. (143088)

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the role of the Paymaster General and her officials was in relation to the Bank of England account used for payments under the support services annexes to the Al Yamamah contract. (143182)

[holding answers 19 June 2007]: The Department is not aware of any such account.

Defence: Procurement

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the value is of orders for urgent operational requirements placed in the last 12 months; and if he will list those items of equipment costing over £250,000. (143050)

Between 1 June 2006 and 31 May 2007 the total value of approved urgent operational requirements was some £810 million. As the operations in Iraq and Afghanistan are still ongoing, much information regarding specific urgent operational requirements remains operationally sensitive and is withheld as its release would, or would be likely to, prejudice the security of our armed forces.

Departments: Advertising

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much revenue his Department received from advertisements on his Department’s (a) public information leaflets and (b) public websites in each of the last 10 years; and if he will make a statement. (142729)

The information requested is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Departments: Aviation

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many flights to overseas destinations were taken by (a) civil servants and (b) Ministers in his Department in each of the last three calendar years; and what the total cost of such flights was. (144936)

This information can be provided only at disproportionate cost. Since 1999, the Government have published on an annual basis, a list of all overseas visits by Cabinet Ministers costing in excess of £500, as well as the total cost of all ministerial travel overseas. Copies of the lists are available in the Libraries of the House. Information for 2006-07 is currently being compiled and will be published before the summer recess. All travel is undertaken in accordance with the Civil Service Management Code, the Ministerial Code and Travel by Ministers.

Ex-servicemen: Military Decorations

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether he plans to extend the eligibility for the issue of Veterans lapel badges to former members of the Women’s Land Army. (143507)

Although the Women’s Land Army included the word “Army” in its title, it was a civilian organisation formed to support agricultural production. While the Ministry of Defence acknowledges the importance of the efforts of all those who contributed to the country’s war efforts in 1914-18 and 1939-45, it is not responsible for the recognition of those who served in such civilian occupations. Nor would it be appropriate to extend to them eligibility for the armed forces Veterans badge which was instituted specifically as a mark of recognition of service in the United Kingdom’s armed forces.

Iraq: Peacekeeping Operations

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will list the contracts his Department has with private military and security companies for services provided in Iraq; what the value is of each such contract; what contracts are being (a) negotiated and (b) considered; what the expected value is of such contracts; and if he will make a statement. (132618)

For the purposes of this response I have taken the question to refer to armed security contracts.

The use of private mobility and security companies for the static guarding of empty buildings is currently being considered.

I also refer my right hon. Friend to the answer I gave on 5 March 2007, Official Report, column 1657W, to the hon. Member for Old Bexley and Sidcup (Derek Conway). No contracts are currently being negotiated between MOD and private military and security companies for services in Iraq.

Members: Correspondence

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence when he expects the hon. Member for North East Milton Keynes’s constituent Mr. Ron Nield to be sent a reply to his letter to the Service Personnel and Veterans Agency. (138906)

If the hon. Member could provide me with Mr. Nield’s personal details (including service number if applicable), the date and subject matter of his letter and the address he wrote to I will be happy to provide him with the information he seeks.

Military Bases: Colchester

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence for how many years the consortium awarded the private finance initiative for the Colchester garrison will have ownership of the land. (136841)

Under the terms of the Colchester garrison redevelopment contract RMPA Services PLC was granted a 150-year head lease over the land that forms the new garrison site. The Ministry of Defence retains overall ownership.

Nimrod Aircraft

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many fuel leaks were recorded aboard RAF Nimrod aircraft in the six months prior to September 2006. (142811)

Between the period 1 March 2006 and 31 August 2006 a total of 52 fuel leaks were reported on Nimrod MR2 and R1 aircraft. A fuel leak is defined as any leakage of fuel from aircraft couplings, pipes or fuel tanks. These did not compromise the safety of the aircraft and were rectified under normal maintenance procedures.

North Atlantic Council

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will make a statement on the outcome of the North Atlantic Council defence ministers meeting on 14 and 15 June 2007. (144046)

[holding answer 19 June 2007]: NATO Defence Ministers discussed a range of issues including the continuing transformation of NATO’s capabilities, missile defence, and operational commitments in Afghanistan and Kosovo. Force planning issues were discussed at the annual meeting of the Defence Planning Committee in Defence Ministers’ Session, and nuclear planning issues at the Nuclear Planning Group.

In addition, Afghanistan’s Defence Minister, Abdul Rahim Wardak attended a special session of the North Atlantic Council together with the non-NATO nations contributing to the International Security Assistance Force. Allies underlined their commitment to the mission in Afghanistan, noted the progress that has already been made, and stressed the importance of Afghan ownership of security issues. The Council noted that the UN had been given a wider remit in the current Security Council Resolution and supported the efforts of the UN to maximise its impact and to expand its presence in the provinces of Afghanistan.

The Council also condemned the Taliban practice of deliberately endangering the civilian population of Afghanistan and underlined NATO’s commitment to avoiding civilian casualties.

A copy of the final communiqué of the North Atlantic Council in Defence Ministers’ Session can be found at:

http://www.nato.int/docu/pr/2007/p07-070e.html

Project Al Yamamah

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what funds have been held by the Defence Export Services Organisation in relation to the Al Yamamah defence contract since May 1997; and if he will make a statement. (143089)

The financial arrangements of the Al Yamamah programme are confidential between the two Governments. I am withholding details as they would, or would be likely to, prejudice international relations and harm the interests of the United Kingdom.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will take steps to authorise the publication of the Comptroller and Auditor General’s reports on the Al Yamamah contract. (142299)

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given on 8 December 2005, Official Report, column 1495W, to the hon. Member for Hornsey and Wood Green (Lynne Featherstone).

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) if he will publish the annexes to the Al Yamamah contract which cover support services; (142301)

(2) what requirement was laid down in the Al Yamamah contract on BAE to inform Ministers of payments made under the support services annexes of the contract; and if he will list all payments reported to Ministers as having been made under those provisions showing (a) the date, (b) the purpose and (c) the recipients of such payments.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) which Ministers in his Department have been informed of payments made under the support services annexes of the Al Yamamah contract since 1997; (143183)

(2) when Ministers in his Department were first informed of payments being made by BAE Systems under annexes on support services to the Al Yamamah contract;

(3) what mechanisms were in place in his Department for official authorisation of payments made under the support services annexes of the Al Yamamah contract by BAE Systems before 1 June 2007;

(4) when the last payment was made by BAE under the support services annexes of the Al Yamamah contract of which his Department was made aware; and what information he has on arrangements for any future payments.

[holding answers 19 June 2007]: Agreements reached under the Al Yamamah programme are confidential between the two Governments. I am withholding details as they would, or would be likely to, prejudice international relations and harm the interests of the United Kingdom.

RAF Brize Norton

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether landing rights have been provided to Prince Bandar of Saudi Arabia at RAF Brize Norton; and if he will make a statement. (143093)

A Saudi Arabian Ministry of Defence and Aviation registered aircraft used by Prince Bandar of Saudi Arabia, HZ-124, has been granted landing rights at RAF Brize Norton. I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 21 May 2007, Official Report, column 1053W, to the hon. Member for Twickenham (Dr. Cable).

Technology Readiness and Risk Assessment Programme

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will make a statement on the status of the Technology Readiness and Risk Assessment Programme. (144013)

[holding answer 19 June 2007]: The Technology Readiness and Risk Assessment Programme was completed in July 2001; an unclassified summary of the work is available in the Library of the House.

Education and Skills

Anthony Bailey

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what role (a) Anthony Bailey and (b) Eligo International played in the Academies programme; and what payments each received. (144543)

Anthony Bailey is on the governing body for Sheffield Park academy and Sheffield Springs academy, which are sponsored by the United Learning Trust.

Eligo International has no role in the Academies programme.

There have been no payments made by the Department to either Anthony Bailey or Eligo International.

Apprenticeships

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many and what percentage of students entering (a) apprenticeships and (b) advanced apprenticeships were already in employment in each year since 1997. (128574)

Data on apprenticeships and advanced apprenticeships are collected on the Learning and Skills Council’s (LSC) individualised learner record (ILR). The work-based learning (WBL) ILR was collated for the first time in 2002/03 and figures are given from that time. The following table shows the number of learners starting advanced apprenticeships and apprenticeships each year who were in employment on the day before their training commenced as a percentage of all starts.

Learners in employment

Number

Percentage

Total learners

2002/03

Advanced Apprenticeship

38,110

57

67,120

Apprenticeship

82,570

61

136,400

2003/04

Advanced Apprenticeship

38,510

68

56,960

Apprenticeship

95,970

70

136,610

2004/05

Advanced Apprenticeship

36,020

67

53,920

Apprenticeship

93,590

69

135,120

2005/06

Advanced Apprenticeship

39,400

76

52,130

Apprenticeship

88,450

72

122,850

Note:

Learners who are not employed on the day before their apprenticeship starts could enter as an employed status apprentice and their employment status then changes because of the Apprenticeship programme.

Children in Care: Standards

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills if he will ensure that Ofsted involve young people with experience of care in its inspecting of care homes. (142311)

This is a matter for Ofsted. HM Chief Inspector, Christine Gilbert, has written to my hon. Friend and a copy of her reply has been placed in the Library.

Letter from Christine Gilbert, dated 15 June 2007:

Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me, as Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, for reply.

You asked whether Ofsted would ensure that young people with experience of care are involved in its inspection of care homes.

Ofsted involves young people by seeking their views during inspection and through highly focused surveys and consultation exercises. Seeking the views of young people is part of the statutory duties of the new Ofsted and developing this further is explicitly outlined in our new Strategic Plan.

Following the expansion of our remit in April this year, Ofsted is working hard to bring together the very best from all four predecessor organisations. At this stage, we are focusing on creating a high quality inspection programme across our expanded remit. We are also looking to incorporate the changes made to the National Minimum Standards and develop this work further over the next few years. This development work will include a range and choice of different methods for all children in inspected services to feed in their views about inspection outcomes.

A copy of this reply has been sent to Jim Knight MP, Minister of State for Schools, and will be placed in the library of both Houses.

City Academies: Private Sector

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills whether any city academy school sites are owned by private sector interests. (141025)

[holding answer 7 June 2007]: We are aware of one case where the freehold of an academy site is held by a private sector organisation. In this case, the land has been leased to the local authority which in turn has leased it to the Academy Trust.

We do not maintain central records which record whether Academy Trusts have freehold or leasehold interests and who granted them. This information could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

However, in all cases, the Academy Trust either owns the freehold of the site or will have been granted a lease of either 99 or 125 years. Where academies are being developed as part of the Building Schools for the Future programme, the Academy Trust will be granted a 125-year lease from the local authority which will commence upon completion of the building.

Class Sizes

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many and what percentage of all pupils aged five, six or seven have been taught in classes of 31 or more in each local education authority in each year since 1997; and if he will make a statement. (142155)

Class Sizes: Middlesbrough

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what the average class size was for (a) secondary schools and (b) primary schools in Middlesbrough, South and East Cleveland in each of the last 10 years. (143435)

The available information is given in the table.

Maintained primary and secondary schools1: average class size2: Position in January each year 1998 to 20073: Middlesbrough, South and East Cleveland constituency

Middlesbrough, South and East Cleveland constituency

England

Primary

Secondary

Primary

Secondary

1998

26.4

22.2

27.7

21.7

1999

26.3

22.1

27.5

21.9

2000

26.0

22.1

27.1

22.0

2001

25.4

22.3

26.7

22.0

2002

24.1

21.1

26.3

21.9

2003

24.6

21.5

26.3

21.9

2004

24.0

21.5

26.2

21.8

2005

23.4

23.1

26.2

21.7

2006

23.8

22.7

26.3

21.5

20073

24.0

22.4

26.2

21.3

1 Includes middle schools as deemed.

2 Classes taught by one teacher during a single selected period on the census day in January.

3 Provisional data

Source:

School Census

Classroom Assistants

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many learning support assistants there were in (a) primary and (b) secondary schools in each local authority area in each of the last 10 years. (141222)

The information is not available in the format requested.

Tables have been placed in the House Library showing the full-time equivalent number of teaching assistants employed in local authority maintained primary and secondary schools by local authority in each year from January 1997 to 2006 the latest information available.

Curriculum: Citizenship

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what assessment he has made of the scope for teaching citizenship outside places of education. (143816)

The post 16 Citizenship support programme encourages development of relevant curriculum models across a wide range of provider types (including work-based, and youth and community providers). The emphasis is on active participation in young people’s own communities. The Ofsted report on Citizenship found that the programme has been successful in showing what can be done in schools, colleges, youth centres and work-based training and recommended that such examples be shared more widely. This recommendation is being taken forward by the programme.

Degrees: Gender

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many and what percentage of (a) women and (b) men did not complete their degree in each of the last five years, broken down by the number of UCAS points on university entry. (144907)

Projected non-completion rates are released by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) each year within the performance indicators in higher education publication.

The latest available non-completion projections are shown in table 1.

Table 1:Proportion of UK-domiciled entrants to full-time first degree courses in UK higher education institutions (HEIs) who are projected to neither obtain an award nor transfer to another institution:

Percentage

1999-2000

15.9

2000-01

15.0

2001-02

14.1

2002-03

14.4

2003-04

14.9

Source: “Performance Indicators in Higher Education”, published by HESA

The 2004-05 figure will be released by HESA on 19 July 2007. These non-completion rates are not available broken down by gender or entry qualification. Drop-out is more likely to occur during the first year of higher education. The performance indicators also include non-continuation rates, which show the proportion of entrants who are not detected in higher education after their first year. The latest available non-continuation rates are shown in table 2.

Table 2: Proportion of UK-domiciled young entrants to full-time first degree courses at UK HEIs not continuing in higher education after their first year

Percentage

1999-2000

7.8

2000-01

7.1

2001-02

7.3

2002-03

7.8

2003-04

7.7

Source: “Performance Indicators in Higher Education”, published by HESA

The 2004-05 figure will be released by HESA on 19 July 2007. The 2002-03 and 2003-04 non-continuation rates are available broken down by entry qualification, as shown in table 3.

Table 3: Percentage of UK-domiciled young entrants to full-time first degrees in UK HEIs in 2002-03 and 2003-04 not continuing in higher education after their first year

Entry qualification Categories

Tariff points

Entrants 2002-03

Entrants 2003-04

A-levels or Highers:

Unknown

11.3

12.6

Up to 200

11.7

11.9

201 to 290

7.9

8.1

291 to 380

4.9

5.3

Above 380

2.6

2.8

Other qualifications

11.4

11.6

All qualifications

7.8

7.7

Source: Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE)

The 2003-04 non-continuation rate is available broken down by gender, as shown in table 4.

Table 4: Percentage of UK-domiciled young entrants to full-time first degrees in UK HEIs in 2003-04 not continuing in higher education after their first year

Rate

Benchmark

Female

6.7

7.3

Male

8.8

8.1

Total

7.7

Source: Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE)

Departments: Compensation

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how much was paid in compensation to (a) pupils and (b) teachers by his Department in each year since 1997. (132382)

We have no records of any compensation payments made to pupils by the Department in the period since 1997. In 2003, a payment was made by the Department to a teacher assigned to the European Schools system in respect of the threshold pay that would have been paid had the teacher remained employed in maintained schools in England and Wales. The amount paid was £2,001. This answer has been provided on the assumption that it relates to payments to serving teachers. It therefore excludes any payments made under the Teachers’ Pension Scheme to retired teachers.

Departments: Vetting

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills which Ministers in his Department have been Criminal Records Bureau checked. (139185)

No DfES Minister is Criminal Records Bureau checked for holding ministerial office because such an office is not one of the excepted professions, offices, employments, work and occupations listed in the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 (Exceptions) Order 1975, as amended.

Education: Capital Investment

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how much capital expenditure there was in the education sector in Blackpool, North and Fleetwood in each year since 1997. (143974)

The Department maintains records of capital allocations on a local authority rather than a constituency basis, also not on an expenditure basis. This is because local authorities may have access to other capital resources, and they decide locally when and how resources should be spent. Capital allocations by the Department to Blackpool, North and Fleetwood in each year since 1997 are set out in the following table.

£ million

1996-97

0.00

1997-98

0.00

1998-99

2.81

1999-2000

4.33

2000-01

7.30

2001-02

8.83

2002-03

7.38

2003-04

17.03

2004-05

14.99

2005-06

11.61

2006-07

8.81

2007-08

5.04

The nil figures in 1996-97 and 1997-98 reflect local authority re-organisation.

The drop in 2007-08 is due to the fact that no Targeted Capital Fund (TCF) allocations are being announced this year. However, £3.8 million TCF allocations in 2005-06, and £3.9 million TCF allocations in 2007-08, will result in phased expenditure over a three year period commencing in the year of TCF allocations, including 2007-08. Other changes, from year to year, are affected by local authority forecasts of pupil numbers.

Education: West Lancashire

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how much capital expenditure there was in the education sector in West Lancashire constituency in each year since 1997. (143526)

The Department maintains records of capital allocations on a local authority rather than a constituency basis, also not on an expenditure basis. This is because local authorities may have access to other capital resources, and they decide locally when and how resources should be spent. Capital allocations by the Department to Lancashire in each year since 1997 are set out in the following table.

£ million

1996-07

12.9

1997-08

13.3

1998-09

19.5

1999-2000

36.8

2000-01

42.2

2001-02

36.0

2002-03

55.5

2003-04

62.6

2004-05

44.2

2005-06

38.1

2006-07

54.7

2007-08

46.7

The increase in funding of £16.6 million in 2006-07, compared with 2005-06, is largely explained by Targeted Capital Fund schemes and a maintained boarding schools grant.

English Language: Education

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what estimate he has made of the number of English as an additional language pupils in West Lancashire constituency. (143535)

The information is given in the following table.

Maintained primary and secondary schools1 : number ad percentage of pupils whose first language is known or believed to e other than English2

Number of pupils2

Number of pupils whose first language is known or believed to be other than English

Percentage of pupils whose first language is known or believed to be other than English3

West Lancashire constituency

12,641

6,614

52.3

England

6,574,560

789,790

12.0

1 Includes middle schools as deemed.

2 Excludes dually registered pupils.

3 The number of pupils whose first language is known or believed to be other than English expressed as a percentage of the total number of pupils of compulsory school age and above.

4 Figures for England have been rounded to the nearest 10.

Notes:

As at January 2007 (Provisional) West Lancashire Constituency

Source:

School Census

Ethnic Minority Achievement Grant: Peterborough City Council

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills when he next plans to review the allocation of ethnic minority achievement grant to Peterborough city council; and if he will make a statement. (144094)

The Government allocate resources to Departments on a three year cycle through spending reviews. DfES received its settlement for 2008-11 in the 2007 Budget. We are currently reviewing the Ethnic Minority Achievement Grant allocation for the next spending review period and aim to make an announcement in the autumn.

Every Child Counts Initiative

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills (1) pursuant to the answer of 5 June 2007, Official Report, column 365W, on the Every Child Counts initiative, how many children are expected to participate in each tuition programme in each financial year until 2010-11; (144488)

(2) how many hours per week of one-to-one tuition in mathematics he expects to be provided to each child per week under (a) the Making Good Progress scheme and (b) the more intensive initiative;

(3) on what date he expects detailed funding allocations for the two schemes to be announced;

(4) whether his Department received its full allocation of finances for the two programmes within its settlement in the 2007 Budget;

(5) what estimate he has made of the cost of employing new staff to provide the one-to-one tuition in each financial year until 2010-11;

(6) on what date his Department first announced the more intensive initiative;

(7) when his Department first started making plans for the more intensive initiative.

The Department is planning two separate, but related one-to-one tuition programmes, which will raise standards in maths:

one-to-one tuition to help 300,000 children who have fallen behind in English and mathematics by 2010-11. Such support is being trialled in the ‘Making Good Progress’ pilot; and

a more intensive initiative specifically designed for early intervention in mathematics; a counterpart to the ‘Every Child a Reader’ literacy programme, on which we are already committed to nationwide roll-out.

The possibility of establishing a numeracy equivalent to Every Child a Reader was under consideration within the Department early in the new year, prior to the Chancellor’s announcement at the Confederation of British Industry on 15 May.

We are currently in the process of planning the scope, resources and roll-out of the early intervention programme and analysing which areas of maths require most support. This will include looking at the numbers of children expected to participate as well as costs of employing new staff.

Under the Making Good Progress pilot children who have been identified for tuition in either mathematics or English will be entitled to up to 10 hours of one-to-one support. We have not recommended a particular pattern of delivery but have suggested that this should be decided on an individual basis. We estimate that the tuition offered through Making Good Progress pilot will reach 10,750 children in each of English and Maths in each of 2007-08 and 2008-09. The comprehensive spending review provides for 300,000 children in each of English and maths in 2010-11. We are currently considering plans on how to build up to that number.

Funding of £20 million for implementation of the Making Good Progress pilot in the first academic year, 2007/08, was announced on 6 June along with details of participating pilot schools. There will be further funding for implementation in the second academic year which will be settled through the Comprehensive Spending Review process.

We will announce detailed allocations for the more intensive initiative in due course.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills pursuant to the answer of 5 June 2007, Official Report, column 365W, on the Every Child Counts initiative, on what date the Making Good Progress pilot was (a) first announced and (b) started. (144490)

The initial proposal for the Making Good Progress pilot was set out in the consultation document “Making Good Progress: How can we help every pupil to make good progress at school?” and launched on 8 January 2007. Following the consultation the list of participating schools and further details about the proposed pilot were announced on 6 June. The pilot, which will span two academic years, will begin in schools in September 2007 and finish in July 2009.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills pursuant to the answer of 5 June 2007, Official Report, column 365W, on the Every Child Counts initiative, how much has been spent on the Making Good Progress pilot. (144506)

Funding of £20 million for implementation of the Making Good Progress pilot in the first academic year, 2007/08, was announced on 6 June along with details of participating pilot schools. There will be further funding for implementation in the second academic year which will be settled through the Comprehensive Spending Review process.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills pursuant to the answer of 5 June 2007, Official Report, column 365W, on the Every Child Counts initiative, what programmes his Department has run since 1997 prior to the two programmes for providing one-to-one tuition in (a) English and (b) mathematics. (144510)

The Department is implementing the Every Child a Reader (ECAR) programme. We are in the third year of a three-year pilot which is helping over 5,000 six-year-olds with significant literacy difficulties to learn to read. It does this by placing highly skilled reading recovery teachers in schools to provide intensive one-to-one or small group support to children most in need.

As a result, we have announced that ECAR will be rolled out nationally from 2008-09, benefiting 30,000 children a year by 2011.

In mathematics, intervention ‘Springboard materials’ have been used for a number of years to support those children who have been identified as working just below age-related expectations and who, with support, might catch-up with their peers. Although they are more often used in group work, they can be used on a one-to-one basis. Wave three intervention materials have more often been used for individuals as well as small groups. Both these materials offer teachers a tracking chart to audit the child's attainment and to identify where to pitch the support.

The Department is also currently providing funding for reading mentors. We provide funding to Volunteer Reading Help (VRH); a charitable organisation which recruits, trains and places volunteers to give one-to-one help twice a week to children aged 6 to 11-years who find reading a challenge. Currently VRH has around 2,000 volunteer readers working with around 5,000 children.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills pursuant to the answer of 5 June 2007, Official Report, column 365W, on the Every Child Counts initiative, what contents and methods will be used in the (a) Making Good Progress pilot and (b) more intensive initiative. (144958)

In “Making Good Progress” the one-to-one tuition will be a programme delivered by a qualified teacher and tailored to meet the needs of each individual child. As such there is no one method or set of materials which will be used. Tutors will liaise with the class teacher to ensure that the tuition that they offer meets the needs of that child and is closely tied in to the work that the child is doing in class.

We are currently in the process of planning the scope and resources of the more intensive initiative. We will make a further announcement in due course.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills pursuant to the answer of 5 June 2007, Official Report, column 365W, on the Every Child Counts initiative, how his Department will determine whether a child has fallen behind in English and mathematics and is therefore eligible for one-to-one tuition. (144959)

In the “Making Good Progress” pilot teachers will use assessment for learning techniques to make judgments about where a child is in their learning, identifying areas of pupil strength and priorities for improvement. Teachers will use these judgments to assess whether a pupil is falling behind age-related expectations and should be offered one-to-one support.

We are currently in the process of planning the scope, resources and roll-out of the more intensive maths intervention programme, announced by the Chancellor on 15 May. This will include looking at how children will be assessed.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what plans he has to implement the Every Child Counts initiative on a national basis. (140148)

The Department is planning two related one-to-one tuition programmes, which will raise standards in maths:

one-to-one tuition to help 300,000 children who have fallen behind in English and in mathematics by 2010-11. Such support is being trialled in the ‘Making Good Progress’ pilot and

a more intensive initiative specifically designed for early intervention in mathematics; a counterpart to the ‘Every Child a Reader’ literacy programme, on which we are already committed to nationwide roll-out.

We are currently in the process of planning the scope and roll-out of the early intervention programme and we will make a more detailed announcement in due course. Delivery is expected to begin during 2008.

Females: Science

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills (1) how many girls from maintained schools were accepted to study (a) physics, (b) chemistry, (c) biochemistry, (d) psychology and (e) sports science at (i) a Russell Group university and (ii) other universities in each of the last five years; (142981)

(2) how many girls from maintained schools applied to study (a) physics, (b) chemistry, (c) biochemistry, (d) psychology and (e) sports science at (i) a Russell Group university and (ii) other universities in each of the last five years;

(3) how many girls from (a) independent and (b) grammar schools applied to study (i) physics, (ii) chemistry, (iii) biochemistry, (iv) psychology and (v) sports science at (A) a Russell Group university and (B) other universities in each of the last five years;

(4) how many girls from (a) independent and (b) grammar schools were accepted to study (i) physics, (ii) chemistry, (iii) biochemistry, (iv) psychology and (v) sports science at (A) a Russell Group university and (B) other universities in each of the last five years.

The available information is shown in the following tables. The figures are taken from data collected by the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) which are limited to students who apply to full-time undergraduate courses via the UCAS application system. The figures do not therefore cover part-time students, nor those full-time students who apply directly to Higher Education Institutions.

Acceptances from female UK domiciled pupils to Russell Group and non-Russell Group2 institutions in the UK by subject of study and type of school3

Year of entry

Type of school

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

All maintained4 schools (including grammar schools)

Physics

at Russell Group Institutions

230

218

177

232

224

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

153

145

111

136

136

Total

383

363

288

368

360

Chemistry

At Russell Group Institutions

444

403

409

454

513

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

519

503

486

493

524

Total

963

906

895

947

7,037

Molecular Biology, Biophysics and Biochemistry5

At Russell Group Institutions

435

393

374

401

337

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

295

308

335

372

369

Total

730

701

709

773

706

Psychology

At Russell Group Institutions

1,435

1,338

1,333

1,363

1,396

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

5,375

5,996

5,988

6,746

6,675

Total

6,870

7,334

7,321

8,109

8,071

Sports Science

At Russell Group Institutions

38

70

72

58

55

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

1,813

1,952

2,042

2,412

2,419

Total

1,851

2,022

2,114

2,470

2,474

Grammar schools

Physics

At Russell Group Institutions

41

49

31

39

44

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

18

23

9

13

10

Total

59

72

40

52

54

Chemistry

At Russell Group Institutions

58

56

62

73

72

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

36

40

33

40

41

Total

94

96

95

113

113

Molecular Biology, Biophysics and Biochemistry5

At Russell Group Institutions

61

40

47

52

41

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

27

27

36

24

22

Total

88

67

83

76

63

Psychology

At Russell Group Institutions

235

185

222

231

207

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

314

383

382

445

357

Total

549

568

604

676

564

Sports Science

At Russell Group Institutions

1

7

9

11

8

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

52

76

83

94

67

Total

53

83

92

105

75

Independent schools

Physics

At Russell Group Institutions

77

64

55

48

59

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

26

19

15

22

18

Total

103

83

70

70

77

Chemistry

At Russell Group Institutions

83

101

87

111

108

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

44

36

36

57

60

Total

127

137

123

168

168

Molecular Biology, Biophysics and Biochemistry5

At Russell Group Institutions

80

95

99

109

83

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

25

36

34

25

32

Total

105

131

133

134

115

Psychology

At Russell Group Institutions

260

329

315

288

283

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

386

394

398

420

373

Total

646

723

713

708

656

Sports Science

At Russell Group Institutions

12

17

18

25

20

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

107

98

125

150

137

Total

119

115

143

175

157

Applications1 from female UK domiciled pupils to Russell Group and non-Russell Group2 institutions in the UK by subject of study and type of school3

Year of entry

Type of school

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

All Maintained4 schools (including grammar schools)

Physics

At Russell Group Institutions

1,358

1,333

1,068

1,292

1,384

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

1,071

1,057

785

1,019

916

Total

2,429

2,390

1,853

2,377

2,300

Chemistry

At Russell Group Institutions

2,278

2,149

2,202

2,519

2,920

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

3,245

2,983

3,167

2,831

2,879

Total

5,523

5,732

5,369

5,350

5,799

Molecular Biology, Biophysics and Biochemistry5

At Russell Group Institutions

2,707

2,459

2,388

2,353

2,166

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

2,132

2,014

2,226

2,285

2,123

Total

4,839

4,473

4,614

4,638

4,289

Psychology

At Russell Group Institutions

12,505

13,500

12,455

12,455

12,014

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

32,351

36,437

35,564

39,761

39,204

Total

44,856

49,937

48,019

52,276

57,278

Sports Science

At Russell Group Institutions

288

494

553

572

511

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

10,010

11,274

11,389

12,723

13,313

Total

70,298

11,768

11,942

73,295

73,824

Grammar schools

Physics

At Russell Group Institutions

231

283

193

235

253

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

147

186

98

125

112

Total

378

469

297

360

365

Chemistry

At Russell Group Institutions

362

367

367

440

473

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

210

257

279

284

275

Total

572

624

646

724

748

Molecular Biology, Biophysics and Biochemistry5

At Russell Group Institutions

421

319

354

297

271

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

177

166

199

160

173

Total

598

485

553

457

444

Psychology

At Russell Group Institutions

1,455

1,569

1,546

1,688

1,374

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

2,348

2,443

2,411

2,751

2,371

Total

3,803

4,012

3,957

4,439

3,745

Sports Science

At Russell Group Institutions

9

39

54

52

29

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

348

481

515

549

470

Total

357

520

569

607

499

Independent schools

Physics

At Russell Group Institutions

444

400

320

322

347

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

215

201

151

147

186

Total

659

607

477

469

533

Chemistry

At Russell Group Institutions

509

545

487

623

653

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

269

315

310

334

337

Total

778

860

797

957

990

Molecular Biology, Biophysics and Biochemistry5

At Russell Group Institutions

474

593

565

459

466

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

178

262

257

214

226

Total

652

855

822

673

692

Psychology

At Russell Group Institutions

2,114

2,626

2,318

2,164

1,888

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

2,610

2,846

2,712

2,917

2,578

Total

4,724

5,472

5,030

5,081

4,466

Sports Science

At Russell Group Institutions

45

84

99

138

116

Non-Russell Group Institutions2

701

634

825

936

824

Total

746

718

924

1,074

940

1 Applicants to UCAS can submit up to six applications, in this table students have been counted once for each application they submit.

2 Includes all other HE and FE institutions covered by the UCAS application system, other than Russell-Group institutions.

3 Excludes a small amount of students with an unknown school type.

4 Maintained sector institutions are comprehensive schools, further/higher education institutions, grammar schools, sixth form centres, sixth form colleges, other maintained institutions and other institutions.

5 Subject figures for Biochemistry can only be displayed as the overall group Molecular Biology, Biophysics and Biochemistry.

Source:

Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS)

Foundation Degrees

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what percentage of employers involved in foundation degrees were in the public sector in each of the last five years for which figures are available; and how many students studied for such degrees with public sector employers in each year. (142157)

We do not classify foundation degrees as public or private sector because students are recorded according to subjects studied and many courses would apply to the public, private and third sectors. Foundation degrees graduates are, however, well-represented in education, and subjects allied to medicine (which together amount to around 35 per cent. of all FD graduates) where the employment opportunities are largely in the public sector, and around a third of all FD courses currently running are in the areas of education, health and care, community or public services.

Employer involvement is an essential feature of all foundation degree programmes. Employers can be involved in the design, delivery and regular review of programmes. It is also expected that there will be recognition from employer bodies such as sector skills councils and professional bodies as well as close collaboration between employer and provider institutions—to ensure foundation degrees are responsive to meeting the nation's skill needs.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many foundation degrees were awarded in each employment sector in each of the last five years. (142158)

The available information shows the number of Foundation Degrees awarded by subject area of study. The latest figures are shown in the table; comparable information for 2006/07 will be available in January 2008.

Number of students1 awarded Foundation Degrees by subject area English Higher Education Institutions—Academic years 2002/03 to 2005/06

Subject area

2002/03

2003/04

2004/05

2005/06

Subjects allied to medicine

65

270

405

775

Biological sciences

45

85

110

235

Veterinary science

10

0

0

0

Agriculture and related subjects

20

145

255

425

Physical sciences

25

30

50

80

Mathematical sciences

5

0

0

0

Computer science

20

125

370

680

Engineering and technology

140

250

400

525

Architecture, building and planning

15

20

50

165

Social studies

70

350

700

720

Law

0

10

15

40

Business and administrative studies

220

385

745

1,110

Mass communications and documentation

35

85

150

230

Languages

0

20

15

15

Historical and philosophical studies

0

0

0

10

Creative arts and design

285

640

980

1,480

Education

110

445

1,385

2,325

Combined

0

0

0

5

Total foundation degree qualifiers

1,060

2,855

5,635

8,820

1 Covers students on full-time and part-time modes of study.

Note:

Figures are rounded to the nearest 5.

Source:

Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

Free School Meals

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many and what proportion of children qualifying for free school meals had (a) one parent, (b) two parents and (c) neither parent in paid work in each year for which figures are available. (141691)

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what percentage of children selected by aptitude to attend (a) city academies and (b) specialist schools are in receipt of free school meals. (141745)

The information requested is not collected centrally.

The following table shows the number and percentage of pupils in academies and specialist schools known to be eligible for free school meals.

Maintained secondary schools and academies1: number and percentage of pupils known to be eligible for free school meals: As at January 2007 (Provisional): England

Number of pupils on roll2

Number of pupils known to be eligible for free school meals2

Percentage of pupils known to be eligible for free school meals

Maintained secondary schools

3,273,520

429,930

13.1

of which:

Specialist schools

2,782,620

345,050

12.4

Academies

40,810

13,610

33.3

1 Includes middle schools as deemed.

2 Includes pupils with sole and dual main registration.

Note:

Numbers have been rounded to the nearest 10.

Source:

School Census

Further Education: Student Wastage

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many students in further education in each of the regions failed to complete their course in the last 12 months; and how many of those were in the final year of their course. (132186)

Non-completion is not a standard measure used in further education (FE). The standard measure of success used in FE is the success rate, which refers to the proportion of qualifications achieved in each academic year against those who start working towards a particular learning aim. Learners who transfer to alternative provision during their programme of study are excluded from the calculation. The following table shows the regional success rates for 2002/03 to 2005/06—the latest full year for all FE funded courses.

FE success rates by region

Percentage

Region

2002/03

2003/04

2004/05

2005/06

East Midlands

69

73

74

76

East of England

67

70

72

75

Greater London

64

67

73

77

North East

68

72

76

77

North West

68

72

75

76

South East

70

73

74

76

South West

68

73

75

76

West Midlands

66

71

75

77

Yorkshire and Humberside

67

71

73

75

England

67

71

74

76

The concept of learners on their final year of a course is also non-standard and is complex to derive and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Further Mathematics

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many students are studying further mathematics A or AS level via the further mathematics network in (a) West Sussex and (b) England. (135179)

The Department does not hold information on the subjects being studied by students at A level. However, data from examination awarding bodies show that 121 students aged 16-18 were entered for GCE A level further mathematics in West Sussex institutions in 2005/06. The number of entrants in England was 6,516. Equivalent figures for GCE AS level entries in further mathematics in 2005/06 were 60 in West Sussex and 4,078 in England. The data do not show how many of these were via the further mathematics network.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills (1) how many students were entered for A level further mathematics examinations in each year since 1997; (135180)

(2) how many students were entered for further mathematics A level in each year since 1997.

The figures requested are in the following table.

Table 1: GCE A level entries in further mathematics by candidates aged 16-18 in all schools and colleges

Academic year ending

Number of entries

2006

6,516

2005

5,192

2004

5,111

2003

4,730

2002

4,498

2001

5,063

2000

5,015

1999

5,145

1998

5,211

1997

4,999

1996

4,913

GCE A Level: Gender

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many and what percentage of (a) girls and (b) boys in maintained schools were awarded (i) at least one A, (ii) at least two As and (iii) at least three As at A level in the last period for which figures are available, broken down by (A) parliamentary constituency, (B) local education authority and (C) region. (143358)

[holding answer 18 June 2007]: The information requested has been placed in the House of Commons Library.

GCSE: Languages

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many pupils in Shropshire were entered for a modern language at GCSE in each year from 2001 to 2006. (127721)

The number of 15-year-olds entered for a modern language GCSE in Shropshire for each year from 2001 to 2006 is given in the following table.

Number of pupils entered for a modern foreign language in Shropshire

2001

2549

2002

2428

2003

2553

2004

2423

2005

2170

20061

11821

1 2006 data are based on amended Key Stage 4 data.

GCSE: Mandarin

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills (1) how many students have taken GCSE Mandarin in each local authority in each of the last five years for which figures are available; (137464)

(2) how many students obtained a grade C or above at GCSE level in Mandarin in each local authority in each of the last five years for which figures are available.

GCSEs

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills pursuant to the answer of 15 March 2007 to question 117654, on GCSEs, how many mainstream (a) maintained and (b) independent secondary schools fell within each percentage point in terms of the proportion of pupils who achieved (i) seven and (ii) nine or more GCSEs at A*-C including English and mathematics in 2006. (132344)

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what proportion of 15-year-olds attending (a) independent mainstream schools and (b) maintained mainstream schools achieved five or more GCSEs at A*-C including English, mathematics and science in each year since 1997 (i) in total and (ii) as a proportion of pupils entered for a full GCSE in English, mathematics and science. (143126)

Head Teachers: Science

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what proportion of head teachers have a degree in a science subject. (141488)

Hearing Impaired: Sign Language

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many lip reading and sign language teachers are employed in Copeland. (143177)

International GCSEs

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what recent discussions the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority has had with Cambridge International Examinations and Edexcel on the accreditation of the international GCSE; and if he will make a statement. (143952)

As regulators of the public examination system, it is QCA’s role to make sure they have reliable, current and comprehensive information on the qualifications market in England. The chairman and chief executive of QCA met Cambridge Assessment’s Group chief executive and discussed iGCSEs at a meeting on Tuesday, 13 March 2007.

Languages: East Sussex

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills which foreign languages were studied by pupils in (a) Eastbourne and (b) East Sussex for (i) GCSE, (ii) A/S-Level and (iii) A-Level in each of the last five years. (130950)

Maintained Schools: Qualifications

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills (1) how many and what proportion of pupils in maintained schools did not achieve five A*-G grades at GCSE in each year since 1997, broken down by gender; (132180)

(2) how many and what proportion of pupils in maintained schools obtained A*-G grades at GCSE in each year since 1997, broken down by gender.

This information is available in the Department’s GCSE and Equivalent Statistical First Releases which have been placed in the House Library.

Nurseries: Fees and Charges

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what assessment he has made of the impact of increases in business rates on fee levels in (a) private day nurseries, (b) voluntary day nurseries, (c) nurseries located in schools and (d) Sure Start children's centres over the last five years; and if he will make a statement. (139717)

No such assessment has been made. Costs and prices in the nursery sector are affected by a wide range of factors.

Some nurseries may be eligible for rate relief to ease the impact of business rates and some voluntary providers, if they pay rates, may be exempt under Schedule 5 of the Local Government Finance Act 1988.

Nurseries: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills if he will take action to assist nurseries and childcare organisations which no longer receive funding from the National Nursery Initiative and are ineligible to become children’s centres; and if he will make a statement. (145018)

1,400 Neighbourhood Nurseries were set up under the Neighbourhood Nurseries Initiative (NNI) which ran from 2002 until 2007, in the most disadvantaged areas within local authorities. 774 of these will become children’s centres by March 2008 while others will link to children's centres for delivery of childcare places. The remainder will continue to operate as stand alone nurseries.

All NNs were required to develop a five-year business plan, demonstrating sustainability when Government funding ended.

Any Neighbourhood Nursery experiencing difficulty when their Government funding comes to an end, should contact their local authority in the first instance. They can provide support for business planning and marketing and in some circumstances may be able to provide financial support to aid sustainability. From 2008, all local authorities will have a duty to secure sufficient childcare in their areas and former Neighbourhood Nurseries will have a substantial part to play in that.

Nursery Schools: Codes of Practice

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills (1) what representations he has received on implementing the Code of Practice for Nursery Education in pilot areas; and if he will make a statement; (144893)

(2) when he expects the Code of Practice for Nursery Education to be fully applied (a) in pilot areas and (b) across England.

The 2006 Code of Practice on the provision of free nursery education places for three and four-year-olds came into force on 1 April 2006. The Code of Practice is statutory guidance that all local authorities, including Pathfinder local authorities delivering the extended free early education entitlement from April 2007, must have regard to when fulfilling their statutory duty to secure sufficient nursery education for children in their area.

Officials meet regularly with representatives from the 20 Pathfinder local authorities. These meetings are opportunities to review progress and discuss emerging issues relating to the extension of the free entitlement to 15 hours.

Ofsted

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills pursuant to the answer of 4 June 2007, Official Report, column 124W, on Ofsted, how much Ofsted spent on legal advice on the drafting of the answer. (143261)

This is a matter for Ofsted. HM chief inspector, Christine Gilbert, has written to my hon. Friend and a copy of her reply has been placed in the House Library.

Letter from Christine Gilbert, dated 19 June 2007:

Your recent Parliamentary Question has been passed to me as Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, for reply.

You asked, following our response of 4th June 2007, Official Report, column 124W, how much Ofsted spent on legal advice on the drafting of that answer.

This information is not available as Ofsted obtains legal advice from an in-house Treasury Solicitors team on the basis of an overall monthly charge. Time is not recorded on a topic specific basis.

A copy of this reply has been sent to Jim Knight MP, Minister of State for Schools, and will be placed in the library of both Houses.

Ofsted: Pay

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what remuneration is received by the Chair of the Ofsted Board for that role. (144544)

Personal, Social and Health Education

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what the evidential basis was for the statement made by Ofsted in its report “Time for Change? Personal, Social and Health Education” that (a) research suggests that education that promotes abstinence but withholds information about contraception can place young people at higher risk and (b) school nurses provide a particularly valuable service in providing emergency hormonal contraception to pupils; and if he will make a statement. (141462)

This is a matter for Ofsted. HM Chief Inspector, Christine Gilbert, has written to the hon. Member and a copy of her reply has been placed in the Library.

Letter from Christine Gilbert, dated 13 June 2007:

Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me, as Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, for reply.

You asked what the evidential basis was for the statements made by Ofsted in its report, “Time for Change? Personal, Social and Health Education (HMI 070049)”, that (A) research suggests that education that promotes abstinence, but withholds information about contraception, can place young people at higher risk; and (B) school nurses are providing a valuable service by offering emergency hormonal contraception to pupils.

Our report states that ‘there is no evidence, however, that ‘abstinence-only’ education reduces teenage pregnancy or improves sexual health. There is also no evidence to support claims that teaching about contraception leads to increased sexual activity. Research suggests that education and strategies that promote abstinence but withhold information about contraception can place young people at a higher risk of pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs).’ There has been widespread international research in this area, including three pieces of research completed by the National Children’s Bureau:

1. Blake, S and Frances, G (2001) Just Say No to Abstinence Education. London

2. Abstinence-only Education, Sex Education Forum, briefing May 2004

3. Swann, C., Bowe, K. MCCormick, G. and Kosmin, M. (2003) Teenage Pregnancy and parenthood: a review of reviews. Evidence briefing. London: Health development Agency. www.hda.nhs.uk/evidence

We found this research persuasive because it reflected our discussions with pupils in 350 inspections who said they valued clear sex and relationship education in school.

Our report states that ‘school nurses can also provide a valuable service, particularly in terms of providing emergency hormonal contraception and advising on other forms of contraception’. This is in line with non-statutory guidance published by the Department for Education and Skills (DfES). The DfES publication “Teenage Pregnancy Next Steps: Guidance for Local Authorities and Primary Care Trusts on Effective Delivery of Local Strategies” (2006) sets out the key findings from ‘deep dive’ reviews carried out by the Teenage Pregnancy Unit to identify factors responsible for the significant variation in performance between local areas, including between areas that are statistically similar. The guidance states:

‘Provision of young people focused contraception/sexual health services, trusted by teenagers and well known by professionals working with them.’ This was the factor most commonly cited as having the biggest impact on conception rate reductions in the high performing areas. Features of successful services reflected the “Best practice guidance on the provision of effective contraception and advice services for young people” issued by the Teenage Pregnancy Unit in 2000: easy accessibility in the right location with opening hours convenient to young people; provision of the full range of contraceptive methods, including long acting methods; a strong focus on sexual health promotion (as well as reactive services) through, for example, outreach work in schools, work with professionals to improve their ability to engage with young people on sexual health issues; and through highly visible publicity. Effective services also had a strong focus on meeting the specific needs of young men. All high-performing areas also had condom distribution schemes involving a wide range of local agencies and/or access to emergency contraception in non-clinical settings.

Ofsted’s own discussions with young people suggest they want and trust services in schools and welcome and recognise the commitment that schools show to meeting their wider health needs.

A copy of this reply has been sent to Jim Knight MP, Minister of State for Schools, and will be placed in the library of both Houses.

Pupil Exclusions

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many pupils had been permanently excluded more than once in each of the last five years, broken down by (a) sex and (b) ethnicity; and how many such pupils had special educational needs. (142549)

[holding answer 20 June 2007]: The available information is given in the table.

Maintained primary, secondary and all special schools, city technology colleges and academies1: Pupils permanently excluded more than once by gender, ethnic group and special educational needs2—2000/01 to 2004/05—England

Number of pupils

Gender

Boys

1,220

Girls

200

Total

1,420

Ethnic group

White

1,090

White British

1,070

Irish

3

Traveller of Irish heritage

3

Gypsy/Roma

3

Any other White background

20

Mixed

70

White and Black Caribbean

30

White and Black African

10

White and Asian

10

Any other Mixed background

30

Asian

30

Indian

10

Pakistani

10

Bangladeshi

3

Any other Asian background

3

Black

80

Black Caribbean

50

Black African

10

Any other Black background

20

Chinese

0

Any other ethnic group

10

Pupils whose ethnicity has been classified under the old ethnic coding framework

50

Unclassified

90

Total

1,420

Special educational needs

No identified SEN provision

550

SEN pupils without statements

580

SEN pupils with statements

300

Total

1,420

1 Includes middle schools as deemed. Includes non-maintained special schools. Excludes general hospital schools.

2 This analysis is based on incomplete pupil level data. Any findings based on these figures should be used with caution. Those pupils who have been permanently excluded from more than one different school since 2000/01 to 2004/05 have been selected.

3 Less than 5 pupils.

Notes:

1. Information presented here has been derived from an extract of the National Pupil Database which has selected pupils with multiple cases of permanent exclusion from different schools collected via the 2002 through to 2006 School Census’. The characteristic data shown relates to information provided for the pupils' most recent exclusion.

2. A new set of codes to record the ethnicity of pupils was introduced in 2002. Schools were initially permitted to report ethnic data using either the old and new set of codes between which there is no direct mapping. This analysis separately shows data for those pupils whose ethnic group has been classified under the old coding framework.

3. The new SEN code of practice came into force in 2002 and introduced new codes for recording stage of SEN. Both the new and old codes have been used here.

4. Numbers have been rounded to the nearest 10. There may be discrepancies between the sum of constituent items and totals as shown.

Source:

National Pupil Database.

Pupil Referral Units

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills (1) how many pupils ceased attendance at a pupil referral unit because they had been sentenced to a term in a young offender institution in each year for which figures are available; (143806)

(2) what information he has collected on the number of pupils placed in pupil referral units who are later (a) sentenced to a term in a young offender institution and (b) subject to an antisocial behaviour order.

Pupil Referral Units: Qualifications

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many and what proportion of pupils in pupil referral units did not obtain (a) five A*-C grades including English and mathematics at GCSE, (b) five A*-G grades at GCSE and (c) any passes at GCSE in each year since 1997, broken down by ethnic group. (132178)