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Pensions: Females

Volume 463: debated on Monday 1 October 2007

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many married women aged (a) 60, (b) 61, (c) 62, (d) 63, (e) 64, (f) 65, (g) 66, (h) 67, (i) 68 and (j) 69 are currently receiving nil basic state pension on their own contribution records; and of these, how many have contribution records of (i) 20 to 24 per cent., (ii) 15 to 19 per cent., (iii) 10 to 14 per cent., (iv) 5 to 9 per cent. and (v) 0 to 4 per cent. (155043)

[holding answer 10 September 2007]: The information is not available for married women only. The information that is available is in the following table.

It shows the number of UK women aged between 60 and 69 in 2003-04 who did not satisfy the “25 per cent. rule” for entitlement to a basic state pension on their own contribution records. It also shows for each age group the proportion of the full rate of basic state pension that they accrued during their working life.

Some of these women may be eligible to receive a basic state pension based on their husband's contribution record.

Number of UK women not satisfying the 25 per cent. rule

Thousand

BSP entitlement at state pension age

Age in 2003-04

0-4%

5-9%

10-14%

15-19%

20-24%

All

60

3

3

8

10

188

212

61

5

4

10

12

174

205

62

6

5

10

17

148

186

63

7

5

13

19

141

184

64

6

7

15

24

145

196

65

6

8

16

31

131

191

66

6

7

20

31

127

191

67

8

6

20

33

108

174

68

7

9

17

33

107

173

69

7

8

19

37

91

162

All

59

60

148

247

1,360

1,873

Notes: 1. Figures refer to women living in the UK. 2. Figures refer to entitlement based on women's own contribution records. 3. Figures exclude women who satisfy the “25 per cent. Rule” but do not satisfy the “first contribution condition” for basic state pension entitlement, and so also receive nil basic state pension based on their own contribution record. 4. The information is based on the data held on the national insurance record up to and including the 2003-04 tax year at May 2005. It therefore excludes any national insurance contributions paid after that date. Source: Lifetime Labour Market Database 2, 2003-04.