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Foreigners: Prisoners

Volume 464: debated on Tuesday 9 October 2007

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many foreign nationals were imprisoned in each of the last five years in England and Wales. (153312)

The figures requested are in the following table:

Immediate custodial sentenced receptions into prison establishments 2001-05

British nationals

Foreign nationals

Unrecorded nationality

Total

2001

84,217

6,026

280

90,523

2002

86,114

7,018

483

93,615

2003

84,251

7,482

512

92,245

2004

84,579

8,355

392

93,326

2005

80,418

9,612

384

90,414

The figures provided in this table are for the number of sentenced receptions into prison establishments in England and Wales in each of the years in question and not the total prison population held in each of the years. The word “imprisoned” is taken to mean the numbers placed in prison under sentence during the 12-month period in each year, not the total numbers held in prison (including prisoners on remand and non-criminal prisoners), which would be answered by prison population figures1.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

1 The figures provided should not be interpreted or used to reflect totals for prison population or total prison capacity.

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many foreign former prisoners were housed in young offender institutions on 20 July 2007. (154026)

Comprehensive data in the form necessary to answer the question is not available on the electronic case management system. The information would need to be gathered from the paper files held on each prisoner and this would involve disproportionate cost.

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the cost was in 2006-07 of providing free telephone calls to foreign national prisoners. (155723)

Prisoners, whether UK citizens or foreign nationals, with close family living abroad receive a free five minute phone call once a month if they have not had a social visit in the preceding period. There is no centrally held information about the cost of free calls nor locally of the breakdown between UK citizens and foreign nationals. Therefore, it is not possible to provide this information. Each establishment pays for such calls from their local budget, and costs are dependent on the number of eligible prisoners as well as the country they wish to call.