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Secondary Education: Curriculum

Volume 464: debated on Tuesday 9 October 2007

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what consideration was given to the teaching of lessons in (a) child care and (b) parenting skills in the development of the new curriculum for secondary schools. (151512)

[holding answer 24 July 2007]: There has always been scope for including lessons on child care and parenting skills within Personal, Social and Health Education and this remains true in the new curriculum for secondary schools.

For example, discussion of the roles and responsibilities of parents, carers and children in families is included in aspects of both the Personal Well Being and Citizenship programmes of study. In addition, some schools also offer child care and health and social care qualifications to their 14-16 year olds. In 2005-06, 28,816 Key Stage 4 pupils were entered for GCSE examinations in these subjects.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families whether the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority classifies the new secondary curriculum as (a) outcomes-based and (b) child-centred. (154335)

The Qualifications and Curriculum Authority classifies the new secondary curriculum as being the fundamental body of knowledge, skills and understanding to which every pupil has a statutory entitlement up to age 16.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families where the programmes of study for the new secondary curriculum reject (a) constructivism, (b) whole language teaching and (c) fuzzy maths as stated by the Chief Executive of the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority in his speech on the launch of the new secondary curriculum. (154340)

The new secondary curriculum programmes of study set out the minimum subject content which must be taught to all pupils. No programme of study makes mention of constructivism. No programme of study requires whole language leaching. No programme of study requires the teaching of fuzzy mathematics.

Schools will continue to decide how they organise their curriculum, lessons and timetable to meet the requirements of the national curriculum.