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Written Answers

Volume 465: debated on Tuesday 23 October 2007

Written Answers to Questions

Tuesday 23 October 2007

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Animal Products: Biofuels

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) what estimate he has made of volumes of tallow disposals following the planned introduction of banding in the renewables obligation in 2009; (159036)

(2) what information his Department holds on the volume of tallow disposed of in landfill over the last three years;

(3) what estimate he has made of the likely costs to industry of converting tallow into biodiesel; and if he will make a statement;

(4) what studies his Department has (a) commissioned and (b) evaluated on the environmental and sustainability impact of converting tallow into biodiesel.

[holding answer 18 October 2007]: No estimates have been made by DEFRA of any changes to tallow disposals following the planned introduction of banding in the renewables obligation in 2009.

Data on the total volume of tallow disposed of in landfill are not held by DEFRA or the Environment Agency. However, the various regulatory restrictions, and the high value of tallow for further uses, for example in the oleochemicals industry, means that its disposal to landfill is likely to be rare.

No estimates have been made by DEFRA of the likely costs to industry of converting tallow into biodiesel.

DEFRA has not commissioned any evaluation of the sustainability impact of converting tallow into biodiesel.

The Government announced on 21 June 2007 that they aim to reward biofuels under the renewable transport fuel obligation (RTFO) in accordance with the carbon savings they offer from 2010, provided that this is compatible with World Trade Organisation rules and EU technical standards requirements. This must also be consistent with the policy framework being developed by the European Commission as part of the review of the biofuels directive, and subject to consultation on the potential environmental and economic impacts of such a scheme.

The Government also announced that from 2011, they aim to reward biofuels under the RTFO only if the feedstocks from which they are produced meet appropriate sustainability standards, again subject to the provisos set out above. The RTFO draft Order provides for an ‘Administrator' of the scheme, which will be a new non-departmental public body. It will have the power to require information from suppliers about the biofuel supplied and feedstocks used. The Government will ask the Administrator to report regularly on the impact on other sectors, and will consider carefully, in the light of these reports, whether any corrective action is necessary.

Animal Products: Waste Disposal

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what volume of tallow has been disposed of in landfill over the last three years; and what arrangements for the disposal of tallow will be made following the planned introduction of the renewable transport fuel obligation in 2008. (158710)

[holding answer 16 October 2007]: Data on the total volume of tallow disposed of in landfill are not held by DEFRA or the Environment Agency.

Under the Animal By-Products Regulation (EC) 1774/2002 (ABPR), tallow can only be landfilled if the animal by-products from which it has been derived have undergone the relevant level of processing (rendering).

Regulatory restrictions and the high value of tallow for further uses mean that its disposal in landfill is likely to be rare.

The disposal of tallow must comply with the relevant regulatory requirements, including the ABPR, waste management legislation and, where appropriate, the waste incineration directive. No other arrangements for the recovery or disposal of tallow are planned by my Department to coincide with the renewable transport fuel obligation’s requirements.

Carbon Emissions: Departmental Co-ordination

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps his Department is taking to co-ordinate efforts across Government to reduce the Government's carbon footprint. (159758)

DEFRA provides the secretariat for the cross-departmental sustainable procurement and operations board which has been set up to drive delivery of the sustainable procurement and operations targets on the Government estate. These targets include action on carbon reduction and energy efficiency.

DEFRA funds the Carbon Trust to provide advice on carbon management and financial support, through Salix Finance, including advice to Departments. Both organisations are expected to benefit under the Environmental Transformation Fund.

DEFRA leads an ‘Act on CO2’ communications campaign across Government Departments to encourage individuals to reduce their carbon dioxide emissions, both at work and at home.

Domestic Wastes: Waste Disposal

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if he will list the research, including opinion research and polling, which his Department has (a) undertaken in-house and (b) commissioned from external sources in relation to charging for the collection of household rubbish. (158097)

(a) No research has been undertaken in-house.

(b) DEFRA commissioned the following research:

The 2007 Survey of Public Attitudes and Behaviours toward the Environment, undertaken by the British Market Research Bureau, which included a section on “attitudes to recycling” and sought views on whether individuals would “favour a system that rewarded them if they recycled everything they could and penalised them if they didn’t”. Fifty-two per cent. of residents were in favour of this statement, with 24 per cent. disagreeing or strongly disagreeing.

In addition, Eunomia Research and Consulting Ltd produced a report for DEFRA on the project ‘Modelling the Impact of Household Charging for Waste in England.’

Plastics: Recycling

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps he has taken to encourage the recycling of plastic; and if he will make a statement. (159145)

Recycling is strongly promoted by a range of Government policies. The Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP) is working to maximise the amount and quality of recyclate used in UK manufacturing operations.

The demand for recycled plastic is very strong, from both UK manufacturers and overseas markets. The UK currently recycles or recovers approximately 19 per cent. of all plastic consumed, and this is set to increase to over 25 per cent. by 2010. WRAP has a number of projects over the next two years which aim to switch manufacturing processes from virgin to recycled materials, including a target to support the recycling of an additional 16 kilo tonnes of plastic bottles—an increase of 30 per cent. from current levels. The use of recycled content in packaging is expanding rapidly, partly due to WRAP’s work to stimulate this market.

The Waste Strategy for England 2007, which we published in May, focuses action on key waste materials for greater scope for improving environmental and economic outcomes, one of which is plastic. The strategy recognises that recycling plastics shows significant potential for carbon and energy savings through displacing virgin materials. Actions set out in the strategy include developing proposals (subject to further analysis) for higher packaging recycling targets beyond the 2008 EC packaging directive targets, and supporting WRAP in its work to increase recycling of plastics and the recycled content of certain plastic containers.

We have set demanding targets, both nationally and locally, for household waste recycling and composting and the Waste Strategy 2007 sets even higher national targets, to reach at least 40 per cent. by 2010, 45 per cent. by 2015 and 50 per cent. by 2020. These targets are not material-specific, but we expect the range of materials collected by local authorities, including plastics, to increase further as targets become more demanding and as collection and treatment capacity increases.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether there is surplus capacity to recycle plastic waste in the UK. (159187)

The Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP) has carried out some work on the plastic processing capacity/supply relationship. The indication is that the UK, along with most of Europe, does have some excess capacity to process plastic waste. The exceptions are plastic bottles, and to some extent waste electrical and electronic equipment plastics, where growth in collection has supported a substantial growth in reprocessing capacity.

However, this is a complex area, and much of the existing capacity is too old, too small or targeting the wrong end products. Many plants are therefore investing in new capacity or updating and consolidating existing plants, some with support from WRAP. WRAP has a number of projects designed to maximise the amount and quality of recyclate, including plastic, used in UK manufacturing operations.

Turtles: Conservation

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what the Government’s policy is on the protection of chelonians, with particular reference to turtles. (159245)

Marine turtles are protected in the UK under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, the Conservation (Natural Habitats, &c.) Regulations 1994 and the Offshore Marine Conservation (Natural Habitats, &c.) Regulations 2007 which came into force in August of this year. These pieces of legislation establish a strict system of protection for marine turtles in the UK, including prohibitions in respect of the deliberate capture, injuring, killing or disturbance, as well as the sale or exchange, of these species.

The UK also plays a prominent role in various international agreements and conventions such as the convention on international trade in endangered species (CITES) and the convention on migratory species (CMS), both of which include measures to protect endangered chelonians (including marine turtles, tortoises and terrapins). The illegal trade in CITES species is one of the top UK wildlife crime priorities for 2007-08, with a particular focus on five species, including tortoises, that are threatened by illegal trade.

Wildlife: Trade

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps he is (a) taking and (b) planning to take to prevent British holidaymakers from participating in the illegal wildlife trade. (159250)

Since 2000 DEFRA, in partnership with WWF-UK, has been running a 'Souvenir Alert' campaign to help tackle the problem of holidaymakers unknowingly bringing back illegal wildlife souvenirs. The campaign advises travellers to be careful when buying souvenirs made from endangered wildlife, so that they do not contribute to the devastating effect of illegal and unsustainable trade. It warns that bringing home souvenirs containing products derived from animals or plants protected by the convention on international trade in endangered species (CITES) may require a permit or may even be prohibited.

DEFRA takes its responsibilities under CITES seriously and continues to look for opportunities to raise awareness of CITES controls to ensure effective implementation.

Defence

Armed Forces: Drugs

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many drugs tests on (a) Army, (b) Navy and (c) RAF personnel produced positive results in each quarter since January 2006, broken down by the (i) class of drugs and (ii) regiment concerned. (158359)

The following tables show the results of drug tests in the armed forces since January 2006, broken down by quarter, class of drug and service. A breakdown by regiment could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Royal Navy

Positive results

Class A

Class B

Class C

Period

Number of Tests carried out

Number

Percentage

Number

Percentage

Number

Percentage

Number

Percentage

2006

1 January to 31 March

3,619

13

0.35

10

0

0

3

1 April to 30 June

2,939

8

0.27

2

0

0

6

1 July to 30 September

3,343

19

0.56

17

0

0

2

1 October to 31 December

3,037

17

0.55

17

0

0

0

2007

1 January to 31 March

2,822

7

0.24

3

0

0

4

1 April to 30 June

2,994

14

0.46

8

0

0

6

1 July to 30 September

2,887

10

0.35

10

0

0

0

Total

21,957

88

0.40

67

76

0

0

21

24

Army

Positive results

Class A

Class B

Class C

Period

Number of Tests carried out

Number

Percentage

Number

Percentage

Number

Percentage

Number

Percentage

2006

1 January to 31 March

32,449

261

0.80

156

12

117

1 April to 30 June

26,105

190

0.73

119

11

82

1 July to 30 September

19,477

152

0.78

220

8

63

1 October to 31 December

26,468

234

0.88

205

9

56

2007

1 January to 31 March

25,230

228

0.90

166

8

80

1 April to 30 June

17,537

189

1.08

148

5

54

1 July to 30 September

16,734

1143

10.85

108

7

42

Total

164,000

1,397

0.85

1,122

67

60

3.6

494

30

1 Awaiting results of 1,250 tests conducted during September 2007.

Royal Air Force

Positive results

Class A

Class B

Class C

Period

Number of Tests carried out

Number

Percentage

Number

Percentage

Number

Percentage

Number

Percentage

2006

1 January to 31 March

3,105

7

0.23

6

0

0

1

1 April to 30 June

3,062

6

0.20

5

0

0

1

1 July to 30 September

3,545

2

0.06

1

0

0

1

1 October to 31 December

3,172

3

0.09

0

0

0

3

2007

1 January to 31 March

2,785

3

0.11

2

0

0

1

1 April to 30 June

3,606

5

0.14

3

0

0

2

1 July to 30 September

2,279

1

0.04

1

0

0

0

Total

21,554

27

0.13

18

67

0

0

9

33

Notes:

1. A single test sample may contain more than one class of drug; the sum of positive test results for class A, B and C drugs may therefore be greater than the overall number of positive results.

2. The percentages in the totals for class A, B and C drugs are the percentages of each class total against the sum of the class totals.

Armed Forces: Pay

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many personnel in the (a) RAF, (b) Army, (c) Navy, (d) Marines and (e) Reserves have been (i) overpaid and (ii) underpaid under the joint personnel administration system since March 2006. (158363)

The joint personnel administration (JPA) system was rolled out to the Royal Air Force (RAF) in March 2006, the Royal Navy (RN) in October 2006 and the Army in April 2007.

Information for the Royal Marines is contained in the RN information. The information on Reserves is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate costs.

The RN and RAF figures for 2006 are as follows:

2006

RN Over

RN Under

RAF Over

RAF Under

March

0

0

0

0

April

0

0

4,064

1,804

May

0

0

230

475

June

0

0

257

288

July

0

0

139

120

August

0

0

2,979

7,058

September

0

0

4

0

October

0

0

0

0

November

9,618

2,289

1,200

1,678

December

0

0

0

0

From January 2007, JPA system errors are no longer recorded separately by service and figures are therefore not available for the Army. The combined figures for 2007 are as follows:

2007

Overpayments

Underpayments

January

161

1,383

February

70

0

March

229

54

April

13,908

252

May

3,430

1,181

June

0

90

July

2,978

416

August

0

51,917

September

0

12

These figures are the total over and underpayments. It should be noted that the majority of the 51,917 underpayments recorded in August relate to a single error which took a charity contribution from each RN/RM account of £3. The error has been corrected and the money will be re-credited to pay accounts in October.

Armed Forces: Pensions

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will estimate (a) the cost of making service in the armed forces prior to 1975 of less than 22 years duration pensionable and (b) the consequential costs elsewhere in the public sector of making service in the armed forces prior to 1975 of less than 22 years duration pensionable. (158652)

It is not practical to make an accurate estimate of the cost of making pension awards to those service personnel who served less than 22 years reckonable service prior to 1975.

The consequential cost of providing pensions for pre-1975 service on a retrospective basis across the public sector would be prohibitive—exceeding billions of pounds.

There remains no realistic prospect that this or any Government could afford to address these public-sector pension legacy issues. Further details were set out in the reply given by my right hon. Friend the Member for East Kilbride, Strathaven and Lesmahagow, then Minister for the Armed Forces, in the Adjournment Debate on 31 January 2007, Official Report, columns 338-40, which clearly set out the legislative and policy background to this matter.

Armed Forces: Personnel Management

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many serving and former RAF personnel payments have been missed since 1 January 2007 under Joint Personnel Administration; how many complaints have been received from members of the armed forces about Joint Personnel Administration; and how many complaints are still outstanding. (158766)

[holding answer 16 October 2007]: The total number of serving and former Royal Air Force personnel payments that have been missed since 1 January could be provided only at disproportionate cost. However, across the three services between 1 January 2007 and 30 September 2007 there have been 55,305 underpayments (which may be considered missed payments) and 683 pension payments which were not enabled within the target of five working days of discharge.

The majority of the 55,305 underpayments relate to a single error that occurred in August which took a charity contribution from each Royal Navy and Royal Marine account of £3. The error has been corrected and the money will be re-credited to pay accounts in the October pay run.

Between 1 January 2007 and 30 September 2007, 1,053 complaints had been received from armed forces personnel via the centralised JPA complaints process about incorrect payments and other apparent problems with pay or the handling of queries. Of these, 47 remain outstanding.

Army: Drugs

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many British Army personnel tested positive after compulsory drug testing using urine samples for (a) cocaine only, (b) ecstasy only, (c) cannabis only and (d) any drug in (i) 2003 and (ii) 2006, broken down by the day of the week on which the sample was obtained. (157335)

The following table illustrates positive drug tests for each drug and combination of drugs for the years 2003 and 2006. Details of the day of the week on which each positive sample was obtained could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Drug type

2003

2006

Heroin

4

1

Total Heroin

4

1

Cocaine

112

340

Cocaine/Ecstasy

7

34

Cocaine/Ecstasy/Amphetamine

1

3

Cocaine/Ecstasy/Cannabis

4

6

Cocaine/Ecstasy/ Amphetamine/Cannabis

2

0

Cocaine/ Amphetamine

1

6

Cocaine/ Amphetamine /Cannabis

0

1

Cocaine/Cannabis

9

33

Total Cocaine

136

423

Ecstasy

85

73

Ecstasy/Amphetamine

7

9

Ecstasy/Amphetamine/Cannabis

4

3

Ecstasy/Cannabis

7

10

Total Ecstasy

103

95

Cannabis

244

221

Cannabis/Benzodiazepine

0

0

Total Cannabis

244

221

Amphetamine

18

15

Amphetamine/Cannabis

6

4

Amphetamine/Methyl Amphetamine/Cannabis

1

0

Total Amphetamine

25

19

Benzodiazepine

6

10

Total Benzodiazepine

6

10

Total positive results

518

769

Army: Recruitment

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the rate of recruitment to the Army was in each of the last five years, broken down by sector. (157165)

The following tables show the rates of gains to trained strength of the UK Regular Army by Arm/Service during the financial years 2002-03, 2003-04, 2004-05 and 2005-06 and for the period 1 April 2006 to 28 February 2007.

Table 1: Regular Army Officer Rates of Gains to Trained Strength (GTS)

Percentage

Arm/Service

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-071

Household Cavalry/Royal Armoured Corps

5.9

6.6

5.8

6.0

6.6

Royal Regiment of Artillery

6.4

5.5

6.4

6.0

5.5

Corps of Royal Engineers

5.6

4.6

5.6

5.6

6.5

Royal Corps of Signals

4.6

4.5

6.0

4.9

4.3

The Infantry

6.6

7.1

5.9

5.7

6.0

Army Air Corps

5.5

6.2

6.9

6.2

5.4

Royal Army Chaplain's Department

7.8

4.2

8.8

5.9

7.3

The Royal Logistics Corps

4.4

4.8

5.0

5.3

4.9

Royal Army Medical Corps

13.0

13.2

14.2

12.4

8.4

Corps of Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

4.7

3.8

5.4

4.3

4.2

Adjutant General's Corps (Provost Branch)

8.1

8.0

8.3

7.5

6.9

Adjutant General's Corps (Staff and Personnel Support Branch)

3.4

4.3

6.0

5.7

5.1

Adjutant General's Corps (Educational and Training Services Branch)

4.8

6.0

5.8

7.1

6.0

Adjutant General's Corps (Army Legal Services Branch)

12.3

3.2

7.5

20.0

11.6

Royal Army Veterinary Corps

10.4

10.4

10.5

17.9

11.5

Royal Army Dental Corps

17.3

9.6

6.2

3.6

13.1

Intelligence Corps

4.7

2.7

5.5

5.2

7.5

Queen Alexandra's Royal Army Nursing Corps

8.2

2.5

7.1

7.4

5.5

Corps of Army Music

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

8.9

Total

5.4

5.2

5.8

5.6

5.6

Table 2:Regular Army Soldier Rates of Gains to Trained Strength (GTS)

Percentage

Arm/Service

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-071

Household Cavalry/Royal Armoured Corps

14.2

11.8

9.6

8.6

10.3

Royal Regiment of Artillery

12.7

11.4

8.9

9.1

8.8

Corps of Royal Engineers

14.3

13.5

15.3

12.6

11.5

Royal Corps of Signals

14.5

10.6

10.1

6.7

6.2

The Infantry

12.8

14.8

11.0

9.7

11.3

Army Air Corps

9.4

9.6

14.9

12.5

9.0

The Royal Logistics Corps

11.9

13.9

11.1

10.6

7.6

Royal Army Medical Corps

11.9

10.9

11.3

11.4

8.5

Corps of Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

11.1

9.5

10.0

10.1

7.0

Adjutant General's Corps (Provost Branch)

9.2

8.4

10.7

6.2

5.0

Adjutant General's Corps (Staff and Personnel Support Branch)

7.2

9.5

4.4

2.3

1.5

Royal Army Veterinary Corps

20.6

11.9

11.5

11.5

9.8

Royal Army Dental Corps

13.3

5.8

3.2

7.8

10.3

Intelligence Corps

8.4

5.1

7.8

9.6

7.9

Queen Alexandra's Royal Army Nursing Corps

12.3

22.3

9.2

10.9

9.7

Corps of Army Music

5.8

5.4

3.7

4.3

2.3

Total

12.1

12.2

10.4

9.3

8.6

1 Due to ongoing data validation following the introduction of the new Joint Personnel Administration (JPA) System, there is no arm/service information currently available since 1 March 2007. Therefore it is possible to provide data only for 2006-07 from 1 April 2006 to 28 February 2007. Notes: 1. Rates are for the Regular Army only and exclude Gurkhas, full-time reserve service, the Home Service battalions of the Royal Irish Regiment and mobilised reservists. 2. Annual rates have been calculated by taking the GTS for each arm/service in the period as a percentage of the average strength for all trained officers and soldiers in that arm/service over the same period. 3. The Officer GTS include all Direct Entry Commissions (DE) and Professionally Qualified Officers (PQOs) who have been recorded as a Gain to Trained Strength during the Financial Years 2002-03, 2003-04, 2004-05, 2005-06 and 2006-07.

Greenwich Hospital: Middleton

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether the Greenwich Hospital, Middleton Estate at Belford, Northumberland, is being marketed in separate lots; what information is being provided to farm and cottage tenants about the progress of the sale; and if he will make a statement. (159113)

Greenwich Hospital’s Middleton Estate was offered for sale in autumn 2006 either as a whole or as six separate lots. In May 2007 the hospital accepted a bid for the whole estate from a consortium which included the three existing tenant farmers. The lead buyer has recently withdrawn but the hospital is currently progressing the sale of the farms to the tenant farmers.

Through its managing agents, the hospital periodically informs all tenants of relevant progress and will continue to do so. All potential buyers are fully aware of the terms of all other existing estate tenancies (around 40) and will be bound to purchase subject to the terms and conditions of these tenancies.

Iraq: Peacekeeping Operations

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many serious hand injuries have occurred to soldiers in (a) Iran and (b) Afghanistan over the last 12 months. (157439)

[holding answer 18 October 2007]: This answer presumes that the question was meant to refer to Iraq, rather than Iran.

Taking a serious hand injury to mean an amputation, open fracture, degloving (removal from the bone of the surrounding muscle and skin structure), or major laceration of artery or vein, our records show that since 1 October 2006 there have been 15 cases in Iraq and seven cases in Afghanistan.

Merchant Marine: War Pensions

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) how many members of the Merchant Marine have been awarded a war pension due to injuries or illness suffered in the Pacific area during nuclear tests; (157827)

(2) what the rationale is for treating members of the Merchant Marine acting alongside UK forces and service personnel differently in relation to qualification for war pensions.

The rules of the Mercantile Marine scheme are currently contained in the War Pensions (Mercantile Marine) Scheme 1964. The scheme dates from the second world war and was intended to reflect the additional dangers of war over and above those normally found on board ship. The scheme therefore provides for awards to be made to members of the mercantile marine only in respect of “war injuries” (injuries caused by enemy action or in combating such action) and “war risk injuries” (injuries resulting from conditions on ship which would not be normal in peace time, such as measures to avoid or prevent enemy action). The scheme does not cover injuries or illnesses arising in peace time.

Owing to the historical nature of the scheme, information on the total number of war pensions is not held. However I refer the hon. Member to my answer of 17 October, Official Report, column 1125W, for the number of those currently in receipt of a pension.

Military Bases: Portsmouth

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what proportion of land at HM Naval Base Portsmouth is allocated to (a) museums and heritage purposes, (b) Vosper Thornycroft Shipbuilders and (c) operational Royal Navy requirements; and if he will make a statement. (159021)

The total area of land at HM Naval Base Portsmouth is some 383 acres. The proportion of land allocated at the naval base for museum and heritage purposes is 3.6 per cent. (13.87 acres); for VT Group Shipbuilders it is 8.5 per cent. (32.65 acres); and for operational purposes it is 87 per cent. (335.5 acres). In addition, 0.3 per cent. (0.98 acres) of land is allocated to BAE Systems. The figure for land required to support operational requirements includes two ship basins, the Royal Marines School of Music, and sports facilities required to prepare Royal Navy personnel for operations.

Military Fighting Vehicles

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether the option for a further 400 Panther command and liaison vehicles will be taken up. (157078)

Navy: Drug Seizures

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the answer of 26 July 2007, Official Report, column 1250W, on Navy: drug seizures, what the circumstances and outcome of each drug seizure made by the Royal Navy in 2006-07 was; and to which law enforcement agency the contraband was turned over in each case. (156247)

The following table sets out the details of each drug seizure in which the Royal Navy was involved, for the financial year 2006-07. All the drug seizures detailed in the table involved cocaine. It is difficult to put an accurate value on the amount of illegal drugs seized or destroyed in these operations. The price of illegal drugs varies greatly depending on supply and demand, as well as the purity of the drugs themselves when they reach the UK market. Therefore quoted MOD figures for the “street value” of successful seizures are always estimates. It should be noted that it is likely that not all the cocaine seized would have reached the UK market.

Date

Location

Estimated Tonnage

Estimated Street Value1 (£ million)

Ships involved

Lead Agency for Contraband

10 September 2006

300 miles north east of Barbados

5

245

RFA Wave Ruler

US Law Enforcement Detachment

5 October 2006

Off the west coast of North Africa

1.8

88

HMS Argyle and RFA Gold Rover

Spanish Law Enforcement Detachment

25 October 2006

Off the coast of Puerto Rico

3

147

RFA Wave Ruler

US Law Enforcement Detachment

6 November 2006

300 miles west of the Cape Verde Islands

1.3

64

HMS Argyle

Spanish Law Enforcement Detachment

23 November 2006

600 miles north east of Barbados

2.9

142

RFA Wave Ruler

US Law Enforcement Detachment

1 If drugs had reached the UK.

In my answer to the hon. Member for Ribble Valley (Mr. Evans) on 26 June 2007, Official Report, column 670W, about drug seizures, it has been identified that the data are incorrect for 2005-06 and 2006-07. The correct tonnage should read 17 and 14 respectively.

Royal Marines: Devonport

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what consideration he has given to moving the headquarters of 1 Assault Group Royal Marines from Poole to Devonport; and if he will make a statement. (159045)

[holding answer 18 October 2007]: As part of the overall FLEET Transformation programme, operational control of 1 Assault Group Royal Marines was transferred on 18 October from the Devonport Flotilla to Flag Officer Sea Training based in Devonport. It is planned for the headquarters element of the assault group (approximately 15 personnel) to relocate from Poole to Devonport in the first half of next year.

Royal Regiment of Scotland

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many non-UK Commonwealth citizens are serving with the Royal Regiment of Scotland. (158702)

The information is as follows:

Non-UK Commonwealth regular officers and soldiers in the Royal Regiment of Scotland at 1 March 2007

Officers

Soldiers

Total

Royal Regiment of Scotland

15

40

55

Notes: 1. Figures are shown as at 1 March 2007, as reliable Army strength statistics to this level of detail are not yet available for 1 April 2007 onwards due to on-going validation of Army data following the introduction of the new personnel administration system. 2. The numbers have been rounded to the nearest five.

The figures above are trained regular officers and soldiers only.

Figures include non-British Commonwealth citizens posted to the Royal Regiment of Scotland and exclude Royal Regiment of Scotland non-British Commonwealth citizens posted away from the unit.

Communities and Local Government

Council Housing: Employment

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what proportion of social tenants were in (a) full-time and (b) part-time employment in (i) 1997 and (ii) the latest year for which figures are available. (157449)

On the basis of figures derived from the Survey of English Housing, it is estimated that, in 1997-98, 23 per cent. of social tenants who were the main householder were in full-time employment and 7 per cent. were in part-time employment.

The latest estimates, for 2005-06, are that 22 per cent. of social tenants were in full-time employment and 9 per cent. in part-time employment.

Empty Property: Public Sector

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government (1) how many public-sector homes in (a) England and (b) each Government office region in England were empty in April 2007; (157561)

(2) how many public-sector domestic dwellings were vacant in (a) England and (b) each Government office region in England in April.

The number of local authority and registered social landlord vacant dwellings in each region at 1 April 2006, the latest date for which figures are available, is below.

Vacancies by region, 1 April 2006

Local authority1

Registered social landlords2

NE

4,358

3,236

NW

6,295

7,947

YH

6,142

2,882

EM

4,294

1,244

WM

3,923

4,550

E

3,105

1,868

L

10,107

4,405

SE

2,780

2,471

SW

1,887

1,567

England

42,891

30,170

Source:1 Housing Strategy Statistical Appendix as reported by local authorities. 2 Regulatory Statistical Return as reported by registered social landlords.

Floods: EC Grants

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what applications she has made to the European Union for funding in relation to 2007 UK flood damage; what assessment she has made of applications by other European states for equivalent funding; and what funding she has secured from the European Union for such purposes. (156276)

An application for support from the EU Solidarity Fund (EUSF) in respect of the June and July flooding in England, Wales and Northern Ireland was lodged with the European Commission on 20 August. It is for the Commission to decide what level of support to offer, and the application is currently being discussed with it.

Applications by other member states to the EUSF have resulted in offers of support ranging approximately between 2.5 per cent. and 5 per cent. of the damage suffered. The UK current estimate for total damage is over €4 billion. Of the total number of applications received by the European Commission since 2002, 23 have been accepted by the Commission and 17 rejected, with a further two withdrawn and decisions pending on five other applications.

Housing: Carbon Emissions

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many of the homes being built in English Partnerships’ eco-village in Bristol will be zero-carbon. (157560)

The homes at the eco-village at Hanham Hall, Bristol are to be developed under the Carbon Challenge. The Carbon Challenge is a competition being delivered by English Partnerships on behalf of the Department for Communities and Local Government and is aimed at accelerating the house building industry's response to climate change. Hanham Hall is owned by English Partnerships and is the first Carbon Challenge site to be developed. All the homes will be required to meet Level 6, which is the highest level, of the Code for Sustainable Homes. The energy standard for code level 6 requires net zero carbon emissions for each new home. This means that, over the course of a year, the amount of energy taken from the grid to facilitate the running of the home will be less than or equal to the amount of energy returned using renewable technologies.

Housing: Low Incomes

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many units of social housing were available in (a) the Cheadle constituency and (b) Stockport local authority in (i) 2005 and (ii) 2006. (157954)

Information specific to the Cheadle constituency is not held centrally, but the numbers of social rent dwellings in Stockport that are owned or managed by local authorities and registered social landlords (RSLs) are tabulated as follows:

1 April

Local authority1

Registered social landlords2

Total

2005

13,104

4,641

17,745

2006

13,000

4,657

17,657

Sources:1 Housing Strategy Statistical Appendix reported by Stockport. 2 Statistical Return reported by registered social landlords.

RSL stock includes supported/older people self contained units and bed spaces.

Housing: Opencast Mining

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what representations her Department has received calling for buffer zones between domestic dwellings and opencast mines; and if she will make a statement. (157659)

I am aware of two representations to the Department which called for buffer zones between domestic dwellings and opencast mines.

The Government have no plans to introduce a planning policy recommending uniform buffer zones around opencast mining sites in England. It considers that the interests of the occupants of neighbouring properties, and the environment, are better served by the present practice of considering the specific impacts of individual mining schemes in the light of all the local relevant circumstances, as part of the preparation of an environmental impact assessment for an application for planning permission.

Local Authorities: Grants

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what plans her Department has to make additional retrospective payments to councils under the local authority business growth incentives scheme following the successful judicial review proceedings brought against it. (157694)

On 6 September, the Department wrote to all eligible local authorities with details of additional payments made as a result of the recent judicial review proceedings. A further explanation can be found at http://www.local.communities.gov.uk/finance/labgi/addpayexp.pdf and individual authority grant awards can be found at http://www.local.communities.gov.uk/finance/labgi/dtmncode20.pdf.

Local Government: Reorganisation

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what the timetable is for (a) primary and (b) secondary legislation in relation to the proposed local government restructuring and establishment of unitary local government. (157665)

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave the hon. Member for Beckenham (Mrs. Lait) on 15 October 2007, Official Report, column 862W.

Mobile Homes Act 1983

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government if she will review the operation of the Mobile Homes Act 1983 as amended in 2006; and if she will make a statement. (160109)

The Government accepted the majority of the recommendations made by the park homes working party in 2000. Since then, Government have been taking forward a significant programme of work to implement those recommendations. Those relating to the Implied Terms in Schedule 1 of the Mobile Homes Act 1983 came into force on 1 October 2006. The remaining recommendations are currently being taken forward and will be completed when parliamentary time allows. As the programme of work is ongoing and has been in force only for a year, we believe it is too early to decide when a review of the effectiveness of its implementation should be carried out.

Public Bodies

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what guidance has been produced for public authorities on procurement and public-sector equality duties. (155702)

I have been asked to reply

Each of the previous equality Commissions, the Commission for Racial Equality, the Disability Rights Commission and the Equal Opportunities Commission produced guidance on procurement and the race, disability and gender public-sector equality duties respectively. The Office of Government Commerce has also produced a guidance note on social issues in purchasing which provides information on public procurement and the public-sector equality duties.

Tenancy Deposit Scheme

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what steps the Government have taken to encourage landlords of student accommodation to sign up to the tenancy deposit protection Scheme; and what further plans she has to encourage such landlords to sign up to the scheme. (160203)

The Department has a publicity and awareness campaign for the tenancy deposit protection (TDP) scheme specifically aimed at students. The campaign was developed in close association with large student accommodation providers and the National Union of Students. TDP has been promoted to students on campuses, in student bars and in public areas, and supported by advertising via ATM machines and on student accommodation websites.

Direct marketing to students at 30 universities in England and Wales started in September 2007, led by students themselves. This encompasses distributing leaflets and posters, information on student blogging websites, web forums and direct information to letting agents offering student accommodation. It is intended that this activity will raise awareness with newly arrived students. This activity is ongoing and will be prominently repeated in January 2008, the peak time when students start searching for private rented property for the autumn term. Such awareness will equip students to know when to tackle their landlords if they believe they have failed to protect their deposits.

National and regional landlord organisations, as well as landlord forums and accreditation schemes run by local authorities, have an active role to play in ensuring that the message is disseminated to landlords. Reputable letting agents are aware of the new requirements and are responsible for ensuring that their landlord clients comply with the legislation.

Unemployment: Housing Problems

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what her strategy is for helping unemployed homeless people and people living in unsettled accommodation, including hostels, into employment and independent living. (157406)

The Government recognise that training and employment are a key route out of homelessness. Our homelessness strategy “Sustainable Communities: Settled Homes; Changing Lives” (2005) includes a programme of work across Government to tackle the wider causes and symptoms of homelessness, including improving access to benefits, training and employment.

The Department for Communities and Local Government is working closely with DWP, Jobcentre Plus, local authorities, the voluntary and community sector, and the private sector on a number of initiatives, including

The Hostels Capital Improvement Programme is providing funding of over £90 million for 178 projects in 62 local authority areas to improve the physical condition of hostels and day centres and transform their services to put activity, training, work, education and social enterprise at the heart of their ethos.

Through the Invest to Save Budget, the Government are supporting the Transitional Spaces Project led by Off the Streets and Into Work project, which plans to work with hostel residents to build their skills and gain sustainable employment.

Government are supporting the Working Future pilot, which is testing the impact of reduced rents and increased access to employment services on work incentives for families with dependent children in private sector leased temporary accommodation in East London.

The Department also continues to support a number of organisations, including Business Action on Homelessness and the Construction Youth Trust, working to support people who have experienced homelessness into work.

Ongoing work with DWP includes reforming the housing benefit subsidy regime to reflect the true costs of temporary accommodation, and supporting DWP's ongoing improvements to housing benefit administration.

The Government are committed to ensuring that the most vulnerable adults are offered the chance to get back on a path to a more successful life, by increasing the proportion of socially excluded adults in settled accommodation and in employment, education or training.

Wales

Departments: Manpower

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales how many and what percentage of employees in (a) his Department and (b) each (i) executive agency and (ii) non-departmental public body funded by his Department are above state retirement age. (158940)

My Department does not have executive agencies or non-departmental public bodies.

Data on the number and percentage of employees above state retirement age for my Department are not available from published sources.

Departments: Public Participation

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales (1) how many citizens’ juries have been arranged by his Department since June 2007; which organisations were commissioned to conduct each citizens’ jury; and what the estimated cost is of each exercise; (159500)

(2) how many citizens’ juries were arranged for (a) his Department and (b) his Department’s agencies in each year since 1997; which organisations were commissioned to conduct each citizens’ jury; and what the cost was of each.

The Wales Office has not conducted any citizens’ juries between 1997 and the present, nor are any currently being arranged.

Departments: Standards

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales how many of his Department’s public service agreement targets (a) take and (b) do not take account of rural proofing. (159635)

The Wales Office does not have public service agreement targets. My Department’s objectives, performance targets and indicators can be found in its annual report.

The 2007 Report (CM7110) can be obtained from the Library of the House or can be viewed on our website at

http://www.walesoffice.gov.uk/2007/AnnualReport2007.pdf

Legislative Drafting

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales if he will list the responses received by the Wales Office to the Government’s consultation on their legislative programme. (160296)

The Leader of the House of Commons has already committed to publishing a summary of all consultation responses and she will do so at the start of the next session.

Foreign and Commonwealth Office

British Nationals Overseas: Courts

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (1) what (a) aid and (b) advice is provided to British citizens who are called upon to act as witnesses in foreign courts; and when such support was last reviewed; (158885)

(2) what estimate he has made of the number of British citizens involved in court cases abroad in each of the last five years;

(3) what information his Department holds on the average level of expenses faced by British citizens who act as witnesses in court cases abroad; and what advice his Department gives such people.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) plays no direct role in arrangements for British nationals acting as witnesses in court cases abroad and therefore does not hold information on the level of expenses involved. For the same reason, I am unable to make an estimate of the number of British nationals involved in court cases abroad in each of the last five years.

When requested, the FCO and consular staff overseas will provide consular assistance in line with the practice set out in our publication “Support for British Nationals Abroad: A Guide”, including general information on legal and police procedures in the country concerned and lists of local English-speaking lawyers and interpreters. Copies of “Support for British Nationals Abroad: A Guide” are available in the Library of the House. Guidance for consular officials was fully reviewed in May 2007.

Burma: Association of South East Asian Nations

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what steps have been taken by (a) the UK Government and (b) the EU to engage with the Association of South East Asian Nations Governments on the situation in Burma. (159115)

My right hon. Friend the Foreign Secretary and I have been in regular contact with Ministers from Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) member states to explain our position and urge them to remain firm in their support for regional and international action on Burma. My right hon. Friend the Foreign Secretary raised Burma with his counterparts from Singapore and Thailand in New York on 26 September. I have raised the issue with Ministers and senior officials from Cambodia, Malaysia, Vietnam, Brunei, Thailand, Singapore, the Philippines and Indonesia. My noble Friend the Minister for Africa, Asia and the UN, the right hon. Lord Malloch-Brown, raised Burma with the Indonesian Foreign Minister in New York at the UN General Assembly and I held further talks with the Singapore Foreign Minister in Singapore on 22 October.

ASEAN issued a strongly worded statement on Burma on 27 September, in which it expressed its revulsion at the actions of the regime and calling on them to stop using violence against demonstrators.

EU Heads of Mission have carried out demarches in ASEAN member states, calling on them to use their diplomatic influence to encourage the Burmese regime to end the repression of demonstrators and free all political prisoners.

Burma: Oppression

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what reports he has received of the recent death under interrogation of a pro-democracy activist in Burma; and what representations he has made to the Burmese authorities. (159301)

We are aware of reports of the death in custody of Win Shwe.

We have repeatedly condemned the Burmese Government’s violent suppression of the recent peaceful demonstrations and the treatment of pro-democracy activists across Burma.

On 15 October, the Council of the European Union released a statement which called for a thorough and impartial investigation of the deaths of demonstrators and other human rights violations in Burma. We, and partners, are urging the Burmese authorities to admit the UN Special Rapporteur on Human Rights to Burma forthwith and co-operate fully with him.

Burma: Politics and Government

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (1) if he will make a statement on the situation in Burma; (158655)

(2) what measures he is taking to promote freedom of speech and expression within Burma;

(3) what pressure is being placed upon the Burmese Government to stop abuses of human rights.

My right hon. Friend the Foreign Secretary made a written ministerial statement on 8 October 2007, Official Report, columns 12-15WS, on the situation in Burma. We placed an updated compilation of reports on the situation in Burma on the Foreign and Commonwealth Office website on 15 October.

On 2 October, the Human Rights Council (HRC) passed a resolution sponsored by the EU, with the strong support of the UK, which expressed deep concern about the situation in Burma. In our statement to the HRC, we drew attention to the regime’s violations, including restrictions on the freedom of speech and association, and the suffering of Burma’s ethnic communities.

The UK co-sponsored the presidential statement unanimously adopted by the UN Security Council on 11 October. This was the first formal action ever taken by the Security Council on Burma. The statement called upon the Government of Burma to take all necessary measures to address the human rights that are the concern of its people.

On 15 October, the EU General Affairs and External Relations Council, at which my right hon. Friend the Foreign Secretary represented the UK, called for a thorough and impartial investigation of the deaths of demonstrators and other continuing violations of human rights. It also called upon the Burmese regime to co-operate fully with the UN Special Rapporteur on Human Rights in Burma, Paulo Sergio Pinheiro. In response to the Burmese Government’s failure to exercise restraint in their treatment of the demonstrators, the Council of the EU agreed to implement stronger restrictive measures against the regime. The strengthened measures include a ban on the import of metals, minerals, timber and semi-precious stones and a ban on investment in these sectors. These measures are designed to target the interests of the Generals, rather than to harm the people of Burma.

Our ambassador in Rangoon has also highlighted our concerns in his meetings with the Burmese Government on an ongoing basis, most recently on 25 September.

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs whether a deadline has been set for reconciliation talks between the Burmese regime and opposition party politicians; and what the status is of these talks. (159864)

[holding answer 22 October 2007]: The UN Secretary-General’s envoy to Burma, Professor Gambari, is promoting a process of national reconciliation in Burma which should include the civil opposition, including Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, the minority ethnic groups and the military junta.

We hope that Professor Gambari will shortly return to Burma to take forward this process. No date has been set for meetings, but we want the reconciliation process to begin as soon as possible.

Burma: Sanctions

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent discussions he has had with his international counterparts on a UN arms embargo against Burma; and when this subject will next be raised at the UN Security Council. (159114)

In his statement of 15 October, my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister said we will begin discussions with our partners about proposals for a UN arms embargo. We are taking this forward at official level.

No date has yet been agreed for further discussions in the UN Security Council, but we expect the Security Council to discuss Burma again when Professor Gambari, the UN Secretary-General’s envoy, returns from the region.

An EU arms embargo is already in place. In response to the Burmese Government’s failure to exercise restraint in their treatment of the demonstrations, on 15 October EU Foreign Ministers agreed to implement stronger restrictive measures against that regime. The EU is prepared to review, amend or reinforce these measures in the light of developments on the ground.

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how the effectiveness of the new package of EU sanctions announced in the EU Council Conclusions on Burma/Myanmar on 15 October will be (a) monitored, (b) assessed and (c) reviewed; and if he will make a statement. (159867)

[holding answer 22 October 2007]: The EU monitors and evaluates sanctions through its range of geographical and thematic working groups. For Burma, the relevant working group is the Committee for Asia (known as COASI). Formal legal reviews of EU sanctions are also undertaken by the Foreign Relations Counsellors Working Party (known as RELEX).

We will be working closely with all our European partners to ensure that this new package of EU sanctions will be properly monitored, assessed and reviewed, which includes addressing any risk that goods might be diverted or re-exported to Burma. The EU is prepared to review, amend or reinforce measures in the light of developments on the ground.

We are discussing a range of broader measures with our EU colleagues that target sources of revenue for the regime, but do not hurt the civilian population. We do not exclude introducing a total ban on future investment if the regime does not make concessions on dialogue.

Whether the EU measures against the Burmese regime are strengthened or relaxed in future will depend on the regime’s willingness to allow a real political transition to begin.

Burma: United Nations

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what steps the EU plans to take to promote UN engagement with Burma; what form such engagement is likely to take; and if he will make a statement. (159865)

[holding answer 22 October 2007]: EU Foreign Ministers meeting at the General Affairs and External Relations Council on 15 October condemned the brutal crackdown on demonstrators in Burma and strongly supported the actions by the UN, in particular the good offices mission of UN Special Envoy Ibrahim Gambari. The Foreign Ministers also announced the imposition of additional measures and sanctions targeting the regime.

The EU will continue to support UN engagement with Burma. The EU has regular and close contacts at all levels with the Association of South East Asian Nations and other partners through which it will underline the importance of lending full regional support to the UN and to Mr. Gambari. The EU also stands ready to review, amend or reinforce these measures, in the light of developments on the ground and the results of the good offices mission of the UN, thereby increasing Mr. Gambari’s leverage with the Burmese regime. The EU will also continue to provide support for humanitarian assistance inside Burma.

Democratic Republic of Congo: Armed Conflict

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what discussions has he had with the Governments of (a) the Democratic Republic of the Congo and (b) Rwanda on how to deal with the militia under the control of General Nkundu. (159326)

My noble Friend the Minister for Africa, Asia and the UN, the right hon. Lord Malloch-Brown, met a delegation of advisers to President Kabila of the Democratic Republic of the Congo in London on 13 September and spoke with President Kabila at the UN on 26 September. On both occasions he urged the Congolese Government to continue to look for a political solution to the problems affecting the east of the country and not to take a military approach against General Nkunda.

My right hon. Friend the Foreign Secretary, together with my right hon. Friends the Prime Minister and the Secretary of State for International Development, met President Kagame of Rwanda on 3 October. President Kagame had another meeting with my noble Friend the right hon. Lord Malloch-Brown and my noble Friend the Under-Secretary of State for International Development, Baroness Vadera, on the same day. President Kagame agreed that integrating General Nkunda’s troops into the Congolese armed forces was a necessary step towards peace. At both meetings the Government of Rwanda were urged to deliver on the commitments made in an agreement with the Democratic Republic of the Congo on 3 September.

Departments: Manpower

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how many people were employed by his Department on 1 January in each of the last five years; and how many of these staff were (a) permanent employees, (b) temporary staff and (c) contractors. (158315)

Figures for Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) staff numbers are published in the Civil Service Annual Statistics reports from the Cabinet Office according to a central counting convention. The figure for the full-time equivalent staff numbers for 2007 is not yet available. The numbers of full time equivalent, UK based staff (ie excluding staff employed locally at posts) for each of the previous five years and including the FCO’s agencies, Wilton Park and FCO Services, were as follows:

Number

2006

6,130

2005

5,930

2004

5,970

2003

5,950

2002

5,680

The figure provided for 2006 is as at 30 September that year. Earlier figures are for 1 April in the relevant year. The numbers for contract and temporary staff employed are not held centrally and it would incur disproportionate cost to collate this information. The growth in staff numbers in 2006 was primarily due to increases in visa and consular work. Funding for staff in these areas is derived from the fees charged for these services.

Departments: Policy

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what policy changes his Department has implemented since 27 June 2007. (159299)

Foreign policy is fast-moving and constantly evolving. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) has implemented a number of new and changed policies since 27 June 2007 and we have kept Parliament fully informed.

These policy initiatives cover a wide range of issues and countries including Burma, Zimbabwe, Russia, Darfur/Chad, Iraq and Afghanistan among others. Details, including statements, speeches, announcements and blogs can be found on the FCO website www.fco.gov.uk and its associated links.

EU External Relations: Zimbabwe

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs when he expects the appointment of a European envoy for Zimbabwe to be agreed by the EU; and if he will make a statement. (157388)

The situation in Zimbabwe is of concern to all EU countries. At the EU General Affairs and External Relations Council on 15 October, Foreign Ministers discussed the role of an EU envoy. The Presidency, in consultation with the Secretary-General of the Council of the EU, is charged with responsibility for taking the issue forward.

International Whaling Commission

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what role his Department is playing in recruiting more pro-conservation countries to join the International Whaling Commission. (159513)

[holding answer 19 October 2007]: Foreign and Commonwealth Office Embassies and High Commissions in the relevant capitals discuss whaling with their counterparts at every appropriate opportunity. In particular, conservation-minded countries are encouraged to join the International Whaling Commission and play an active part in protecting whales. This ensures that these countries are in no doubt as to the importance that the UK attaches to whale conservation.

Japan: Whales

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what role his Department is playing in establishing the countries being approached by Japan to join the International Whaling Commission. (160024)

[holding answer 22 October 2007]: UK diplomatic missions in the relevant capitals are briefed and engage in discussion with their counterparts on whaling at every appropriate opportunity. Posts are aware of the need to watch for indicators that countries may join the International Whaling Commission and adopt a pro-whaling stance. Countries are lobbied and are in no doubt as to the importance that the UK attaches to whale conservation.

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what role his Department is playing in discussions about whaling with countries that vote with Japan at the International Whaling Commission but have no vested interest in whaling. (160025)

[holding answer 22 October 2007]: UK diplomatic posts in all the relevant capitals are briefed and engage in discussion with their counterparts on whaling at every appropriate opportunity. The UK, together with its like-minded allies, lobbies the Governments of the countries that vote with Japan at the International Whaling Commission to ensure that they are in no doubt as to the importance we attach to whale conservation.

Republic of Ireland: Diplomatic Service

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how many officials of diplomatic rank who were responsible for or privy to (a) the decision to dispose of Glencairn, County Dublin, (b) its subsequent lease back to his Department and (c) the purchase of Marlay Grange, Dublin have since 2000 (i) been raised to the peerage, (ii) received Knighthoods or the rank of Dame and (iii) been recipients of any other honours from the Queen. (159052)

[holding answer 22 October 2007]: The decisions referred to were taken by Ministers after advice from officials. Many officials would have been privy to the decisions at that time and it is not possible to identify them all without incurring disproportionate cost.

Honours are awarded to officials for exceptional public service.

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (1) how many hectares comprised the Glencairn House and estate prior to its disposal; how many hectares have subsequently been leased back; what the rental cost is for each year of Glencairn’s lease back to his Department; and if he will make a statement; (159053)

(2) what the receipt from the sale of Glencairn House, County Dublin was; what the cost is each year of its subsequent rental; and what the total costs were of legal agents and other fees relating to its sale and subsequent lease back.

[holding answer 22 October 2007]: I refer my hon. Friend to the report on the Rationalisation of the Glencairn Estate, Dublin produced by the Comptroller and Auditor General to the House of Commons which gives full details of the sale of Glencairn and purchase of Marlay Grange. The report is available at:

http://www.nao.org.uk/publications/nao_reports/03-04/03041088.pdf.

The Glencairn House and estate comprised 14.2 hectares and was sold for IR £27 million (£24 million) in 1999. The Ambassador remains in occupation of the house and its immediate curtilage. No land has been leased back since the sale, nor is any rent paid for the occupation of Glencairn House. Under terms agreed with the purchaser, the agreed portion of the sale price relating to Glencairn House and its immediate grounds of 2.87 hectares (IR £4 million, £3.5million approximately at today’s rate of exchange) will only be payable when the Foreign and Commonwealth Office gives vacant possession. Total fees (legal and agents’) relating to the sale amounted to about £170,000.

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (1) when his Department became aware that Marlay Grange, Dublin had an asbestos problem; why the asbestos was not revealed in the survey commissioned prior to its purchase; and if he will make a statement; (159054)

(2) what the total cost was of the purchase of Marlay Grange, Dublin; what the subsequent cost to date has been of (a) asbestos treatment and removal and (b) all other refurbishment costs; what (i) other costs of maintenance of the buildings, (ii) other costs of maintenance of the grounds and (iii) other maintenance costs have been incurred; and if he will make a statement.

[holding answer 22 October 2007]: I refer my hon. Friend to the report on the Rationalisation of the Glencairn Estate, Dublin produced by the Comptroller and Auditor General to the House of Commons which gives full details of the sale of Glencairn and purchase of Marlay Grange. The report is available at

http://www.nao.org.uk/publications/nao_reports/03-04/03041088.pdf.

Marlay Grange was purchased for IR £8 million in 2000 (£6.258 million). An initial survey of the property, carried out in October 1999, showed that a comprehensive refurbishment would be required. However, this was not an invasive survey as the owners were still living in the property and would not permit one. The extent of asbestos only became known after the property was purchased, when the full survey was carried out in preparation for refurbishment.

Up until mid-2004, we had spent £700,000 on works to Marlay Grange, which included asbestos removal, fees and security works. No refurbishment works have been carried out. Since mid-2004 we have incurred security and minor maintenance costs of £507,000.

Sudan: Peacekeeping Operations

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs when he expects the new peacekeeping force to be deployed in full in Darfur. (158762)

The full deployment of the mission will depend on how quickly the force can be generated and the necessary infrastructure and support put in place. This is being carried out by the UN’s Department of Peacekeeping Operations.

The Government are pressing for the full mission to deploy as quickly as possible, as my noble Friend the Minister for Africa, Asia and the UN, the right hon. Lord Malloch-Brown, stated when he met UN Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon and African Union (AU) Chairperson Alpha Konaré at high level meetings in New York on 21 September.

UN Security Council Resolution 1769 mandates the new AU-UN Mission in Darfur to assume authority from the current AU Mission in Sudan no later than 31 December, with a view to achieving full operational capability and force strength as soon as possible thereafter. We will continue to press all sides to meet this timetable.

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what progress is being made towards finding a settlement in relation to the situation in Darfur. (158763)

The meeting led by the African Union (AU) and UN in Arusha on 3-6 August, attended by most rebel leaders, was an important step forward in the political process. Rebels expressed their commitment to participate fully in negotiations under AU-UN leadership, presented a common platform on key issues and urged the AU-UN to continue consultations with Darfurian civil society.

The Darfur peace talks are due to begin in Libya on 27 October. We support the AU-UN Joint Mediation Support Team who will lead negotiations. They have developed a mediation and communication plan which should help to ensure effective civil society participation. We urge all parties, rebels and the Government of Sudan to engage fully in these talks and to be prepared to negotiate. Only a political process can provide a sustainable solution to the crisis in Darfur.

Zimbabwe: Politics and Government

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what representations he has received on the situation inside Zimbabwe; what steps the UK is taking to provide assistance to the people of that country; and if he will make a statement. (158841)

My right hon. Friend the Foreign Secretary regularly receives updates on the situation in Zimbabwe through our embassy in Harare, and met a member of the Movement for Democratic Change earlier this month to discuss the situation in person. Other Ministers and senior officials are in contact with members of the non-governmental organisation and civil society community and with the Zimbabwe diaspora in the region and more widely. The UK continues to provide up to £40 million in humanitarian aid keeping ordinary Zimbabweans alive. In conjunction with EU partners, we continue to apply targeted measures against President Mugabe and 130 of his elite. We ensure that the UN remains seized of the crisis and we continue to provide support for all those working for democratic change in Zimbabwe.

Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform

Post Offices: Access

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform what meetings Ministers in his Department had with Royal Mail to discuss disability access to Crown post offices before 19 April; and what such discussions they have had since that date. (153003)

I raised the issue as part of a wide- ranging discussion of Post Office-related matters with the Managing Director of Post Office Ltd when we met on 29 August.

Regional Development Agencies

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform how many regional development agencies outside London share foreign offices with the London Development Agency; and in what locations. (158121)

The London Development Agency has only one foreign office, in Beijing, and this is not shared with any other RDAs.

Regional Development Agencies: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform what the (a) total budget and (b) estimated administration costs are of each regional development agency in England in 2007-08. (158117)

The Regional Development Agencies’ grant in aid and their administration budgets for 2007-08 are set out in the following table.

£000

Grant in aid

Administration

Advantage West Midlands

296,165

20,896

East of England

139,279

11,427

East Midlands

178,624

16,500

North West

402,315

38,236

ONE

281,553

22,958

South East

166,241

20,300

South West

162,495

23,545

Yorkshire Forward

309,976

19,919

1 RDAs have other sources of income other than grant in aid (including European funding and coalfields funding).

The Mayor approves the LDA’s budget for administration.

World War Two: Medals

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform whether coalminers required to remain working in collieries during the Second World War will be deemed eligible for a Bevin Boy badge from his Department. (160458)

The purpose of the Bevin Boys Veterans Badge is to recognise those who were selected or volunteered as part of the Bevin Boys scheme. Although miners who were already employed in the pits and were exempt—along with railway and dockworkers, farmers, agricultural workers, schoolteachers and doctors, from conscription under the 1938 Schedule of Reserved Occupations—also made a similar contribution to the war effort they were not part of this process and are therefore not eligible.

Home Department

Alcoholic Drinks: Children

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many prosecutions there were for selling alcohol to children and young people under the age of 18 in (a) England and Wales and (b) each police force area in each year between 1997 and 2004; and if she will make a statement; (158857)

(2) how many penalty notices for disorder in relation to the sale of alcohol to a person under 18 years of age were issued in each year since 2004, broken down by police force area; and how many of these resulted in an unpaid fine in each area.

The information requested on prosecutions for selling alcohol to persons under 18 years are provided in table 1.

In addition to prosecutions, the offence of sale of alcohol to a person under 18 can attract a penalty notice for disorder (PND). The offence was added to the PND scheme on 1 November 2004, and information on the number issued with outcomes including the number resulting in an unpaid fine is provided in the attached table.

Unless contested by the offender or cancelled, an unpaid PND fine is registered at the courts at an added 50 per cent. value and the offender is then pursued through the courts for payment. Data on the number of fine registered PNDs are also provided in table 2.

Number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates' courts for selling alcohol to underage customers, England and Wales 1997 to 20051, 2, 3

Police force area

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

Avon and Somerset

22

3

1

2

14

Bedfordshire

1

1

1

2

7

10

Cambridgeshire

2

7

4

2

4

9

Cheshire

5

14

10

6

4

16

20

8

Cleveland

2

1

1

4

10

14

Cumbria

4

11

4

2

2

1

1

8

Derbyshire

11

7

6

8

3

37

22

13

Devon and Cornwall

9

1

2

1

12

8

Dorset

2

6

1

3

9

10

35

Durham

1

2

2

Essex

6

7

2

2

3

7

2

8

Gloucestershire

1

1

5

Greater Manchester

21

27

21

22

20

39

129

180

117

Hampshire

1

7

6

3

2

4

9

11

Hertfordshire

3

1

1

1

8

3

Humberside

3

11

2

Kent

1

5

3

12

15

14

Lancashire

17

3

6

1

13

14

23

22

89

Leicestershire

1

3

1

1

1

10

15

10

27

Lincolnshire

2

17

4

11

Merseyside

8

3

1

14

42

19

16

Metropolitan Police

13

13

17

2

19

12

113

167

253

Norfolk

1

1

4

1

9

3

North Yorkshire

3

3

7

22

3

Northamptonshire

5

2

3

1

11

Northumbria

34

92

41

17

17

8

38

51

79

Nottinghamshire

3

1

7

9

11

South Yorkshire

2

4

5

14

22

5

18

Staffordshire

11

2

1

3

8

5

20

Suffolk

9

1

1

3

Surrey

3

3

1

5

4

10

13

Sussex

3

3

1

2

7—

8

4

4

Thames Valley

2

4

2

1

3

6

28

15

Warwickshire

1

27

26

7

West Mercia

3

3

5

3

3

7

5

19

West Midlands

11

14

28

18

8

10

20

45

76

West Yorkshire

14

12

9

8

9

14

2

21

15

Wiltshire

2

2

2

1

6

10

23

Dyfed-Powys

3

3

6

8

3

2

5

24

6

Gwent

13

5

5

4

5

9

2

20

16

North Wales

1

1

2

2

1

1

7

5

10

South Wales

6

4

6

7

29

34

55

Total

215

311

205

132

158

170

616

861

1,084

1 These data are provided on the principal offence basis. 2 Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the police forces and courts. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. 3 Covers the offences: Selling etc intoxicating liquor to person under 18 for consumption on the premises under the Licensing Act 1964 S.169 A and B as added by Licensing (Young Persons) Act 2000 S.1, Wholesaler selling intoxicating liquor to a person under 18 under the Licensing Act 1964 S.181 A(1) as added by Licensing Act 1988 S.17, Sale of alcohol to a person under 18 under the Licensing Act 2003 S. 146 and Allowing Sale of alcohol to a person under 18 under the Licensing Act 2003 S. 147. Sections 146 and 147 of the 2003 Licensing Act only came into effect from 24 November 2005, so data prior to 2005 is not available. The first two offences cannot separately identify on and off premises consumption although both are covered by the statutes. Source: RDS—Court proceedings database—Office for Criminal Justice Reform—Ministry of Justice

Number of penalty notices for disorder issued to all persons aged 16 and over for sale of alcohol to a person under 18, with outcomes, England and Wales 2004 and 20051

2004

Police force area

Number issued

Paid in full

Fine registered

Contested in court

Cancelled

Outcome unknown

Avon and Somerset

Bedfordshire

Cambridgeshire

Cheshire

Cleveland

Cumbria

Derbyshire

Devon and Cornwall

Dorset

22

18

2

2

Durham

Essex

7

7

Gloucestershire

127

99

22

127

99

22

Greater Manchester

Hampshire

2

1

1

Hertfordshire

Humberside

2

2

Kent

Lancashire

30

3

1

26

Leicestershire

2

2

Lincolnshire

London, City of

Merseyside

2

2

Metropolitan

21

18

3

Norfolk

North Yorkshire

Northamptonshire

1

1

Northumbria

1

1

Nottinghamshire

9

9

South Yorkshire

2

2

Staffordshire

Suffolk

Surrey

Sussex

Thames Valley

Warwickshire

West Mercia

1

1

West Midlands

6

4

2

West Yorkshire

4

4

Wiltshire

Dyfed Powys

Gwent

North Wales

1

1

South Wales

England and Wales

113

74

10

2

27

2005

Police force area

Number issued

Paid in full

Fine registered

Contested in court

Cancelled

Outcome unknown

Avon and Somerset

56

51

4

1

Bedfordshire

2

2

Cambridgeshire

11

11

Cheshire

49

46

2

1

Cleveland

33

32

1

Cumbria

23

23

Derbyshire

8

7

1

Devon and Cornwall

82

75

7

Dorset

22

22

Durham

Essex

120

117

6

Gloucestershire

42

37

5

Greater Manchester

127

99

22

5

1

Hampshire

67

58

7

1

1

Hertfordshire

3

3

Humberside

45

41

3

1

Kent

10

4

6

Lancashire

190

163

22

1

4

Leicestershire

46

40

4

2

Lincolnshire

26

24

1

1

London, City of

Merseyside

73

57

15

1

Metropolitan

161

133

16

12

Norfolk

North Yorkshire

Northamptonshire

39

33

4

2

Northumbria

48

45

3

Nottinghamshire

117

100

17

South Yorkshire

107

98

9

Staffordshire

19

18

1

Suffolk

19

18

1

Surrey

Sussex

63

61

2

Thames Valley

12

12

Warwickshire

3

2

1

West Mercia

22

21

1

West Midlands

114

99

13

1

1

West Yorkshire

72

59

11

1

1

Wiltshire

8

7

1

Dyfed Powys

18

18

Gwent

20

18

2

North Wales

58

46

10

1

1

South Wales

123

108

13

1

2

England and Wales

2,058

1,805

211

5

30

7

1 Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Office of Surveillance Commissioners: Inspections

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many local authorities were inspected by the Office of the Surveillance Commissioners in each year since its creation. (158135)

Inspections of local authorities conducted on behalf of the Chief Surveillance Commissioner commenced in 2001 when 47 were inspected. The number of local authorities inspected in subsequent years as follows.

Number

2002-03

189

2003-04

184

2004-05

111

2005-06

151

2006-07

184

Passports: Applications

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many and what percentage of first-time applicants were awarded UK passports from the Glasgow Passport Office within six to eight weeks of the date of application in the last period for which figures are available; (159183)

(2) how many first-time passport applicants in the UK who failed in their initial application for a UK passport were successful in their (a) second, (b) third and (c) fourth attempts in the last period for which figures are available;

(3) how many first-time passport applicants in Scotland who failed in their initial application for a UK passport were successful in their (a) second, (b) third and (c) fourth attempts in the last period for which figures are available.

The Identity and Passport Service does not hold data on the number of attempts an applicant for a UK passport must make to have an application accepted.

In the last five months, approximately 71,500 first- time passports were issued in Glasgow. Of these, 725 (1.0 per cent.) took six to eight weeks to complete as they were complex, non-straightforward cases.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many first-time passport applicants in the UK had their initial application refused in each year since 1997; (159306)

(2) how many first-time passport applicants from Ochil and South Perthshire had their initial application refused in each year since 1997;

(3) how many first-time passport applicants from Scotland had their initial application refused in each year since 1997.

Information is not available in the form requested. Identity and Passport Service statistics record the final outcome of applications and do not show whether the applications were initial or subsequent applications. Records of applications that do not result in the issue of a passport are broken down between those that failed because the applicant did not hold British nationality and those that were unsuccessful for any other reason. No breakdown by area or by application type is available and the information is not held for years before 2002. The available figures are as follows.

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

Total intake

5,507,748

5,650,771

6,140,667

6,543,122

6,429,927

Total unsuccessful

30,131

33,613

34,094

39,085

38,251

Percentage of total intake

0.55

0.59

0.56

0.60

0.59

Sussex Police: Working Hours

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what average percentage of their time police officers in Sussex Police spent (a) completing paperwork and (b) on patrol in each of the last five years. (157798)

Data on time spent on patrol offers only a partial indication of policing activity, but 61.1 per cent. of police officer time in Sussex was spent on front-line policing in 2006-07, which includes time in station completing incident related paperwork.

I also refer the hon. Member to the reply provided by my right hon. Friend the Home Secretary on 15 October 2007, Official Report, columns 537-39W.

Women and Equality

Age Discrimination

To ask the Minister for Women and Equality what recent representations she has received on the application of age discrimination regulations to the sale of insurance policies and holidays to older people. (149529)

The Government are considering whether there is a case for introducing legislation to prohibit harmful age discrimination in the provision of goods, facilities and services as part of an Equality Bill. A public consultation ran from 12 June to 4 September, during which time around 750 responses were submitted on the subject of the possible legislation prohibiting age discrimination. Insurance policy sales and age-targeted holidays were among the issues raised, most notably by organisations representing older and young people, industry representatives and individuals. Both issues were also fully discussed at consultation events held in London and Edinburgh. We will publish information about the responses received in due course.

Equality and Human Rights Commission: Finance

To ask the Minister for Women and Equality what the total estimated annual cost is of (a) salaries, (b) pension contributions and (c) bonuses of staff employed by the Equality and Human Rights Commission. (157112)

When the new commission is at full complement, it is expected that the costs will be roughly as follows: salaries £20,000,000, pension contributions £4,400,000 and bonuses £400,000.

Equality and Human Rights Commission: Manpower

To ask the Minister for Women and Equality how many staff are employed by the Equality and Human Rights Commission. (157109)

There are currently 410 people employed by the commission including temporary staff. There are plans to increase the number to 518 by the end of the financial year.

Equality and Human Rights Commission: Marketing

To ask the Minister for Women and Equality how much was spent on (a) branding, (b) marketing and (c) website design in changing the title of the Commission for Equality and Human Rights to the Equality and Human Rights Commission. (157114)

Equality and Human Rights Commission: Redundancy

To ask the Minister for Women and Equality how many staff employed by (a) the Commission for Racial Equality, (b) the Disability Rights Commission and (c) the Equal Opportunities Commission were made redundant prior to the establishment of the Equality and Human Rights Commission. (157107)

No staff were made redundant from any of the legacy commissions. However, the three commissions ran voluntary severance schemes and the following numbers left the commissions: the CRE had 78 leavers, the DRC had 68 leavers and the EOC had 39 leavers.

Rape: Victim Support Schemes

To ask the Minister for Women and Equality what meetings she has held with ministerial colleagues to discuss the possible closure of rape crisis centres. (157119)

This is an issue which I take very seriously and which I am discussing with other Ministers.

This Government are committed to putting victims at the heart of the criminal justice system. The cross-Government sexual violence and abuse action plan which we published earlier this year sets out our commitment to supporting victims of sexual assault. We have increased the capacity and stability in support services for victims by extending the network of sexual assault referral centres, with the intention of 30 being in place by the end of this financial year. There has also been significant investment in the specialist voluntary sector, including rape crisis centres. That includes an increase in the funding made available this year.

Culture, Media and Sport

Arts: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how much his Department (a) allocated for spending and (b) spent on (i) the arts, (ii) sport and (iii) heritage in each year since 1997 in 2007-08 prices. (158829)

[holding answer 17 October 2007]: The table shows how much the Department for Culture, Media and Sport allocated and spent on the arts, sport and heritage from 1997 to 2007-08 in 2007-08 prices. Spend figures for 2007-08 are not yet available.

Sector

1997-98

1998-99

1999-2000

2000-01

2001-02

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

Arts

Allocation

250.9

248.8

281.0

287.9

297.7

337.7

384.4

408.8

432.7

442.9

420.3

Spend

250.9

248.8

280.6

287.5

297.4

332.0

361.9

399.5

433.4

442.0

Sport

Allocation

64.0

61.6

63.4

63.3

80.9

127.8

108.0

157.6

158.4

188.2

186.4

Spend

64.0

61.5

63.0

63.3

75.8

125.1

87.5

120.3

124.0

173.3

Heritage

Allocation

198.8

188.6

180.9

181.4

178.5

214.6

174.7

185.0

202.4

205.9

190.7

Spend

199.0

185.7

177.8

180.2

167.0

178.7

173.1

182.2

174.3

193.6

Big Lottery Fund

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport pursuant to the answer of 8 October 2007, Official Report, column 311W, on the Big Lottery Fund, which statutory bodies received grants, and for what purpose, in each year since 2004. (158825)

[holding answer 17 October 2007]: I am arranging for the tables to be placed in the House Library, listing statutory bodies, by organisation type, that have received Big Lottery Fund grants since 2004 and the programme name under which they have received those grants. A glossary, explaining the purpose of each programme, is also included. The information requested by year for each statutory body, including the purpose of each grant (approximately 2000 in 2005 alone), could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

British Bob Skeleton Association: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what criteria are used in deciding whether to fund a national sport governing body; whether recognition of that body by the international federation of that sport is taken into account; and how the criteria were applied in the case of the British Bob Skeleton Association. (159239)

The criteria used by Sport England to determine whether a national sports governing body received whole sport or one stop plan funding between 2005-09 was based on the sport's current ability to deliver mass participation and elite performance and the potential ability to deliver growing levels of participation and strong elite performance.

The criteria used by UK Sport to decide whether to fund a national sport governing body through the world class performance programme are principally based on performance evidence—a combination of the past results and future medal potential of its athletes.

For both Sport England and UK Sport recognition of that body by the international federation of that sport is taken into account, but is not in itself a determining factor. Additionally, under UK Sport's criteria, the right to compete in events under international federation control is essential

In the case of the British Bob Skeleton Association, the decision to fund its current world class performance programme was based primarily on its being our most successful winter sport in recent years, having won a medal at both the Salt Lake City and Turin Winter Olympic Games.

Departments: Manpower

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many people were employed by his Department on 1 January in each of the last five years; and how many of these staff were (a) permanent employees, (b) temporary staff and (c) contractors. (158319)

I refer the hon. Member to the information published by the Office for National Statistics in Table 6 of the Quarterly Public Sector Employment First Release for the latest year i.e. 31 March 2007 http://www.statistics.gov.uk/pdfdir/pse0607.pdf

For earlier years, I refer the hon. Member to Table A of the Civil Service Statistics publications shown in the following table.

Date of Data

Link

Sept 2006

http://www.statistics.gov.uk/StatBase/Product.asp?vlnk=2899&Pos=&ColRank=1&Rank=422

April 2005

http://www.civilservice.gov.uk/management/statistics/reports/2005/tables_and_charts/index.asp

April 2004

http://www.civilservice.gov.uk/managent/statistics/reports/2004/tables_and_charts/index.asp

April 2003

http://www.civilservice.gov.uk/management/statistics/reports/2003/tables_and_charts/index.asp

Notes: 1. Statistics are not collected or published for the reference date 1 January. 2. The Civil Service statistics represent those employees paid directly from the Department's payroll. 3. For 2005 and 2006 the Civil Service Statistics were not published with the permanent and temporary/casual breakdown. The information for 30 September 2006 is shown in the following table.

Headcount

permanent

Headcount temporary/casual

Headcount total

FTE permanent

FTE temporary/ casual

FTE total

Department for Culture Media and Sport

550

0

550

540

0

540

Royal Parks

90

10

100

80

10

90

Note: Numbers are rounded to the nearest 10.

Any contractors are employed via agencies and so not paid directly by the Department or its agency. Information on contractors therefore cannot be provided.

Departments: Official Visits

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport on how many occasions he has visited each region in an official capacity in the last 12 months. (158917)

Since taking up his post on 28 June 2007, the Secretary of State has officially visited the north-west four times; the west midlands once; the east of England twice; and London seven times. All ministerial travel is undertaken in accordance with the ministerial code.

Gambling: Credit Cards

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what discussions he has had with banks and other financial institutions which issue credit cards on the use of such cards in gambling; if he will bring forward proposals restricting the use of credit cards for gambling; and if he will make a statement. (159481)

The Government are committed to ensuring there are proper controls and safeguards on the use of credit cards for gambling, particularly for those most at risk.

Under the Gambling Act 2005, credit cards cannot be used to pay for gambling offered by casino or bingo operators or be used to play gaming machines. The Act contains powers for the Gambling Commission and the Secretary of State to take steps to further regulate gambling and credit through licence conditions (sections 81 and 177), if the need arises.

Where credit cards are permitted, under the commission’s licence conditions and codes of practice, gambling operating licence holders have to comply with robust social responsibility requirements including conditions on the provision of credit by operators and the use of credit cards.

DCMS Ministers have not had any discussions with banks and other financial institutions on the use of credit cards in gambling. However, the Gambling Commission keeps such matters under review as part of its functions.

Museums and Galleries: Fees and Charges

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how much income was generated by entrance fees by each of the national museums and galleries in each year between 1995-96 and the abolition of such charging in constant 2007-08 prices. (156709)

Table 1 shows the gross income generated by entrance fees to the national museums and galleries sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport from 1995-96 until 2001-02, in 2007-08 prices, and table 2 shows this income in cash terms. Free admission for all children to the charging national museums and galleries sponsored by the Department was introduced from 1 April 1999, and free admission for all those aged 60 and over became effective from 1 April 2000. The Victoria and Albert Museum reintroduced universal free admission on 22 November 2001. The other formerly charging museums that introduced universal free admission from 1 December 2001 were the Imperial War Museum (main site in Lambeth), Museum of London, Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester, National Maritime Museum, National Museum of Science and Industry (Science Museum in London, and National Railway Museum in York), National Museums Liverpool, Natural History Museum (main London site and Tring branch) and Royal Armouries (Leeds and Fort Nelson sites).

Table 1: Gross income generated by entrance fees to the National Museums and Galleries sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport: 2007-8 prices

£

Museum/Gallery

1995-96

1996-97

1997-98

1998-99

1999-2000

2000-01

2001-02

Imperial War Museum1

4,144,736

4,172,435

4,568,354

4,735,122

4,158,447

4,574,048

4,134,561

Museum of London

392,751

402,292

448,339

578,045

592,251

642,932

607,912

Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester

604,219

845,053

690,835

974,116

718,425

616,215

780,205

National Maritime Museum

1,956,096

1,615,740

1,527,672

1,654,405

2,162,631

1,801,174

1,291,077

National Museum of Science and Industry2

4,367,830

4,542,214

4,714,580

4,999,342

3,897,864

3,662,548

2,782,048

National Museums Liverpool

399,546

337,872

647,600

705,115

555,617

403,725

296,510

Natural History Museum3

4,449,370

5,549,257

5,649,577

5,918,733

5,195,931

5,216,903

4,288,305

Royal Armouries4

54,360

64,419

76,639

105,892

561,722

611,629

383,325

Tate5

407,700

433,844

427,901

484,611

435,945

429,826

479,745

Victoria and Albert Museum6

199,227

1,617,839

2,842,518

3,039,332

2,181,340

2,846,197

1,666,651

1 Includes the Imperial War Museum at Lambeth and Duxford, the Cabinet War Rooms, and HMS Belfast.

2 Includes the Science Museum, South Kensington and the National Railway Museum, York.

3 Includes the Natural History Museum at South Kensington and Tring.

4 Figures for 1995-98 are for the Fort Nelson site only, because the Royal Armouries at Leeds was operated by Royal Armouries International (RAI) at that time. RAI ceased operating the Leeds site during 1999, therefore the figures from 1998-99 to 2001-02 include both Fort Nelson and Leeds.

5 Tate St. Ives. The figure for 1995-96 is estimated.

6 Includes the Victoria and Albert Museum, South Kensington and the Theatre Museum. In 1995-96, South Kensington had free admission, but a voluntary donation of c. £4.50 was strongly suggested upon entry. Admission charges at South Kensington were introduced on 1 October 1996.

Note:

Figures from 1999-2000 to 2001-02 are estimated.

Source:

Prepared with information supplied by the sponsored national museums and galleries, and calculated with reference to the CDP Deflator Table published by HM Treasury.

Table 2: Gross income generated by entrance fees to the National Museums and Galleries sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport

£

Museum/Gallery

1995-96

1996-97

1997-98

1998-99

1999-2000

2000-01

2001-02

Imperial War Museum1

3,049,840

3,173,731

3,576,521

3,800,909

3,405,394

3,799,064

3,516,248

Museum of London

289,000

306,000

351,000

464,000

485,000

534,000

517,000

Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester

444,605

642,783

540,848

781,928

588,325

511,809

663,527

National Maritime Museum

1,439,363

1,229,000

1,196,000

1,328,000

1,771,000

1,496,000

1,098,000

National Museum of Science and Industry2

3,214,000

3,455,000

3,691,000

4,013,000

3,192,000

3,042,000

2,366,000

National Museums Liverpool

294,000

257,000

507,000

566,000

455,000

335,322

252,168

Natural History Museum3

3,274,000

4,221,000

4,423,000

4,751,000

4,255,000

4,333,000

3,647,000

Royal Armouries4

40,000

49,000

60,000

85,000

460,000

508,000

326,000

Tate5

300,000

330,000

335,000

389,000

357,000

357,000

408,000

Victoria and Albert Museum6

146,598

1,230,597

2,225,380

2,439,689

1,786,321

2,363,964

1,417,408

1 Includes the Imperial War Museum at Lambeth and Duxford, the Cabinet War Rooms, and HMS Belfast.

2 Includes the Science Museum, South Kensington and the National Railway Museum, York.

3 Includes the Natural History Museum at South Kensington and Tring.

4 Figures for 1995-98 are for the Fort Nelson site only, because the Royal Armouries at Leeds was operated by Royal Armouries International (RAI) at that time. RAI ceased operating the Leeds site during 1999, therefore the figures from 1998-99 to 2001-02 include both Fort Nelson and Leeds.

5 Tate St. Ives. The figure for 1995-96 is estimated.

6 Includes the Victoria and Albert Museum, South Kensington and the Theatre Museum. In 1995-96, South Kensington had free admission, but a voluntary donation of c. £4.50 was strongly suggested upon entry. Admission charges at South Kensington were introduced on 1 October 1996.

Note:

Figures from 1999-2000 to 2001-02 are estimated.

Source:

Prepared with information supplied by the sponsored national museums and galleries

National Lottery: Sports

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how much was distributed to sport from the National Lottery in each year since 1997, broken down by sports lottery distributor. (158147)

The table shows the total Lottery income to the sport distributors, for the last 10 complete financial years. Figures are rounded to the nearest thousand pounds.

£000

Sport England

Sport Northern Ireland

Sport Scotland

UK Sport

Sport Council for Wales

1997-98

307,001,000

10,127,000

32,854,000

18,173,000

1998-99

255,901,000

8,316,000

27,439,000

15,053,000

1999-2000

210,868,000

7,163,000

23,585,000

18,932,000

12,625,000

2000-01

226,931,000

7,709,000

25,850,000

24,010,000

13,911,000

2001-02

228,026,000

8,004,000

25,739,000

25,615,000

14,171,000

2002-03

193,745,000

7,197,000

23,337,000

21,461,000.

12,586,000

2003-04

170,746,000

6,322,000

19,758,000

19,986,000.

10,522,000

2004-05

179,868,000

6,924,000

20,936,000

20,978,000

10,895,000

2005-06

183,328,000

7,130,000

21,263,000

21,550,000

10,943,000

2006-07

124,909,000

6,258,000

18,494,000

53,912,000

9,458,000

Radio: Reviews

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport (1) whether his Department plans to respond to the Ofcom publication—The Future of Radio; (159697)

(2) what plans his Department has to implement the proposals outlined in Ofcom's publication “The Future of Radio”.

Earlier this year, Ofcom consulted on the proposals outlined in its publication “The Future of Radio”. I understand that Ofcom is currently considering the results of that consultation and plans to publish its conclusions by the end of the year. I look forward to considering any proposals that it presents to Government.

Rugby

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport whether he plans to meet representatives of the English, Scottish, Irish and Welsh rugby football unions. (159902)

I have regular meetings with representatives of the English RFU and last met them on 9 July 2007.

I have no current plans to meet representatives of the Scottish, Irish and Welsh rugby football unions, but am happy to do so.

Sports: Broadcasting

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what mechanisms he will use to review the list of sporting events which must be offered at a fair and reasonable price to free-to-view broadcasters; and if he will make a statement. (160427)

It remains the Government's intention to review the list of sporting events in around 2008-09. No decision has yet been made on the exact date and nature of the review.

Swimming Pools

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many Olympic-size swimming pools (a) there are and (b) are planned to be built before 2012 in the (i) Yorkshire and the Humber, (ii) North, (iii) North West, (iv) South West, (v) East Midlands, (vi) West Midlands, (vii) East of England and (viii) London regions. (159715)

I refer my hon. Friend to the answer I gave the hon. Member for Bath (Mr. Foster) on 8 October 2007, Official Report, columns 334-35W, for information about the number and location of Olympic size swimming pools in Yorkshire and the Humber; North West; South West; East Midlands; West Midlands; East of England; and London regions. There are currently no Olympic-size pools in the Northern region.

Since that reply, a new 50-metre indoor pool has been completed in Leeds (Yorkshire and the Humber).

A further four pools are either under construction or have planning permission in Liverpool (North West); Sunderland (North); Hillingdon (London); Portsmouth (South East). Discussions are also proceeding on proposals to develop further Olympic size pools in the South West, East of England, East Midlands, West Midlands and London regions, with a view to their opening before 2012.

Children, Schools and Families

Antisocial Behaviour: Stoke on Trent

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the Respect programme in Stoke-on-Trent. (159418)

Stoke-on-Trent is one of 77 areas that have benefited from a close working relationship with the Respect task force. Complementing its broad range of approaches to tackle antisocial behaviour and its causes, Stoke has appointed a Parenting Practitioner to work with parents of young people who are involved in or at risk of becoming involved in antisocial behaviour, and has also developed a Family Intervention Project in the Meir neighbourhood. The Local Government User Satisfaction Survey shows that the proportion of the public who perceive a high level of antisocial behaviour in Stoke-on-Trent fell from 50 per cent. in 2003-04 to 31 per cent. in 2006-07.

Child Minding: Qualifications

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what support the Government provides for child minders to obtain higher early years qualifications. (159450)

In our Children’s Workforce Strategy we set out a commitment to increase qualifications in the Early Years Workforce. We have a General Sure Start Grant (GSSG) allocation for 2007-08 that includes funding to local authorities to ensure that all early years education and child care workers receive appropriate training, development and support.

We have a Transformation Fund of £250 million from 2006 until 2008 to help deliver our long term commitment to transforming the quality of early years child care. A main aim of the fund is to achieve a greater proportion of the work force being qualified to Level 3 and above.

Children in Care

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what his estimate is of (a) the number of children in the care of a local authority who are placed outside that authority’s area and (b) the percentage of such children who are privately fostered; and if he will initiate a formal review of the guidance issued to local authorities on managing such placements. (159103)

[holding answer 18 October 2007]: The number of children looked after who were placed outside their responsible local authority area at 31 March 2007 was 18,400. This represented 31 per cent. of all children looked after on that date. None of them were privately fostered: children who are privately fostered are not ‘looked after’ by local authorities. Through the legislation to implement the “Care Matters” White Paper, we will strengthen the statutory framework so that a local authority may not place a child out of its area unless it is satisfied that such a placement is in the child’s best interests. Statutory guidance for local authorities will be issued to support this.

Curriculum: Citizenship

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what response he plans to make to the recommendation of the National Foundation for Education Research Citizenship Education Longitudinal Study that the statutory citizenship curriculum be strengthened in (a) status, (b) credibility and (c) visibility. (159647)

Citizenship is a statutory part of the national curriculum for all pupils aged 11-16 and part of a joint non-statutory framework in primary schools alongside personal, social and health education (PSHE). The recent review of the secondary school curriculum undertaken by the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) gave new impetus to the citizenship curriculum by adding a new strand entitled “Identity and diversity: living together in the UK”, following the recommendation in Sir Keith Ajegbo's review of diversity and citizenship. The DCSF, in partnership with CfBT and the Association for Citizenship Teaching (ACT), is running a national support programme to help schools implement these changes. From January to April 2008, there will be one day regional training events targeted at subject leaders. A national subject lead for citizenship has been appointed, who will work with 27 new regional advisers to support local networking.

We are also working with the National College for School Leadership (NCSL) to raise the status of citizenship with head teachers, providing a fully subsidised continuing professional development course for citizenship teachers to improve their skills, and developing a new, full GCSE and A-level in citizenship studies, in response to demand. In addition, guidance on the new duty for schools to promote community cohesion, which came into effect on 1 September 2007, makes clear that good citizenship education can make a significant contribution to this area and demonstrate schools' compliance.

We will continue to work with the NfER and use the findings of the Citizenship Education Longitudal Study to inform future policy.

Departments: Internet

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many websites his Department operates; how many it operated at 1 January 2005; and what the estimated annual cost has been of running his Department's websites in the last five years. (157765)

The Department runs 25 main Government websites (URL domains). In addition the Department operates a number of sub-sites falling under the main domains.

There would be a disproportionate cost to provide the further information requested.

The Department is working towards consolidation of all its websites. Public-facing content is being migrated to Directgov and business content to Business Link.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many hits the (a) most and (b) least popular website run by his Department has received since 1 January 2007. (157766)

The Department’s corporate website (www.dcsf.gov.uk), including the former Department for Education and Skills site (www.dfes.gov.uk), was the most popular during this period with 8,660,722 unique visitors. The Foundation Degree site (http://www.foundationdegree.org.uk) was the least popular with 62,619 unique visitors during this period.

Departments: Parking Offences

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many fixed penalty tickets were incurred by vehicles within the purview of his Department in the last year for which figures are available; and what the total cost was. (157763)

On receipt of a notice of intended prosecution (NIP) which results in a fixed penalty notice for parking, speeding, jumping of traffic lights etc., the driver of the vehicle will be highlighted and the details of the driver passed to the relevant authorities. At this point the matter becomes one between the authority and the driver. No record is kept of this information as it is still subject to appeal by the driver, and no costs are incurred by the Department as traffic offences are a matter for which the driver must pay directly depending on the outcome.

Departments: Standards

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many of his Department’s public service agreement targets (a) take account and (b) do not take account of rural proofing. (159638)

None of the targets underpinning the PSAs that my Department agreed in the 2007 comprehensive spending review themselves make explicit reference to rural areas. That is because the PSAs are about improving outcomes for all children and young people. However, in designing and developing policies to deliver the PSAs, particularly in the context of the forthcoming Children’s Plan, the Department will take into account all factors which prevent children and young people from achieving those outcomes, including rural issues (in accordance with guidance provided by the Commission for Rural Communities and the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA)).

Departments: Stationery

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how much the Department for Education and Skills spent on departmental branded stationery between 1 January and 27 June. (159790)

The spend on departmental branded stationery between 1 January and 27 June 2007 for the former Department for Education and Skills was £11,990.14.

Free School Meals: Leeds

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many school children in Leeds, West were in receipt of free school meals in the last 12 months; and what percentage of the total number of school children in the area this represents. (159858)

The requested information is shown in the following table.

Maintained nursery, primary and secondary schools1: school meal arrangements2, January 2007—England, Leeds local authority and Leeds, West parliamentary constituency

Maintained nursery and primary schools

Number on roll

Number of pupils taking free school meals3

Percentage taking free school meals

Number of pupils known to be eligible for free school meals

Percentage known to be eligible for free school meals

England

4,148,390

544,370

13.1

658,910

15.9

Leeds local authority

60,977

8,704

14.3

11,473

18.8

Leeds, West parliamentary constituency

6,872

1,365

19.9

1,729

25.2

Maintained secondary schools

Number on roll

Number of pupils taking free school meals3

Percentage taking free school meals

Number of pupils known to be eligible for free school meals

Percentage known to be eligible for free school meals

England

3,272,480

314,630

9.6

429,700

13.1

Leeds local authority

46,620

4,950

10.6

7,452

16.0

Leeds, West parliamentary constituency

3,937

647

16.4

986

25.0

1 Includes middle schools as deemed.

2 Includes boarders and dually registered pupils.

3 Number of pupils who took a free school meal oh the day of the census in January.

Note:

National totals have been rounded to the nearest 10. There may be discrepancies between the sum of constituent items and totals as shown.

Source:

School Census

Intimidation: Internet

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families if he will have discussions with colleagues in the Department of Culture, Media and Sport to consider what steps can be taken to prevent use of the internet as a vehicle for bullying. (160224)

The Government are committed to finding further actions which can improve the situation. The Department has launched an awareness campaign and issued guidance to schools, and we are in dialogue with industry to find the best way forward. In relation to all matters concerning the internet, we work closely with colleagues in other Departments, including the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, the Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform, the Home Office and the Ministry of Justice.

Pupils: Safety

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what education is given to pupils about road safety; and if he will make a statement. (159263)

The Department's “Safety Education: Guidance for schools” advises how schools can deliver safety education, which would include road safety education, within the framework of personal, social and health education. It also highlights how other parts of the national curriculum can be used to develop children's ability to assess and control risks to themselves and others.

The secondary school curriculum has been reviewed this year by the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority. The revised curriculum, to be phased in from September 2008, includes new programmes of study for personal social health and economic education. There is scope to cover road safety through the key concept of risk where pupils are taught that the

“ability to recognise, assess and manage risk is essential to physical safety”.

It is for schools to determine how road safety education is provided to their pupils.

Schools: Sports

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many (a) competition managers and (b) sports co-ordinators for schools have been appointed; and what proportion of schools are in a school sport partnership. (159455)

[holding answer 19 October 2007]: 71 competition managers have been appointed. There are 3,602 sports co-ordinators in place. All maintained schools in England are part of a school sport partnership.

Schools: Standards

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what factors affected the decision (a) to include pupils who have been relocated through managed moves to new schools in the new schools performance statistics and (b) not to include in those statistics those pupils permanently excluded. (160080)

[holding answer 22 October 2007]: The excluded pupils' policy, in the achievement and attainment tables, was put in place to ensure schools that admitted pupils excluded from a maintained school were not penalised for doing so.

Under this policy, the admitting school can request to have excluded pupils removed from the school's number on roll. Results for the excluded pupil will still count in the school's performance figures provided the pupil was permanently excluded from another maintained school. This ensures that the admitting school's performance results are not adversely affected by taking on an excluded pupil.

Managed moves can be a good way of dealing with pupils who are at risk of exclusion, and offering them a fresh start, without going through the formal exclusion process. As they have not been formally excluded no special consideration is given to the counting of these pupils in a school's results. Pupils who move schools as a result of managed moves are attributed to the school where they were on roll at the time of the January School Census.

Special Educational Needs: East of England

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how much funding was allocated to special needs provision in each county in the East of England in each year since 1997. (159214)

The requested information is contained in the following table.

Budgeted net expenditure on the provision of education for children with special educational needs1,2 in the East of England Government office region (GOR): 2000-01 to 2007-083

£

Budgeted net expenditure on the education of children with special educational needs1,2

Local authority name

2000-01

2001-02

2002-03

2003-04

England

2,763,226,000

2,908,380,000

3,038,661,0sp00

3,466,180,000

East of England GOR

262,754,000

281,293,000

296,178,000

339,448,000

Bedfordshire

19,250,000

21,011,000

18,838,000

24,669,000

Cambridgeshire

31,017,000

33,352,000

36,290,000

44,958,000

City of Peterborough

12,325,000

13,410,000

14,787,000

16,936,000

Essex

62,904,000

68,285,000

69,328,000

75,876,000

Hertfordshire

54,162,000

56,668,000

55,427,000

63,654,000

Luton

9,136,000

9,321,000

14,765,000

15,673,000

Norfolk

34,824,000

37,782,000

38,304,000

42,233,000

Southend-on-Sea

8,867,000

10,222,000

10,653,000

13,096,000

Suffolk

22,845,000

23,452,000

29,012,000

32,374,000

Thurrock

7,425,000

7,788,000

8,774,000

9,979,000

£

Budgeted net expenditure on the education of children with special educational needs1,2

Local authority name

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-083

England

3,774,757,000

4,120,549,000

4,481,245,000

4,868,366,000

East of England GOR

371,652,000

393,061,000

431,678,000

473,841,000

Bedfordshire

26,198,000

27,455,000

31,224,000

32,013,000

Cambridgeshire

42,980,000

45,120,000

47,217,000

48,756,000

City of Peterborough

18,620,000

20,337,000

23,188,000

24,838,000

Essex

81,359,000

87,946,000

96,982,000

103,046,000

Hertfordshire

71,970,000

75,794,000

79,344,000

87,928,000

Luton

17,867,000

17,431,000

21,541,000

23,164,000

Norfolk

44,946,000

48,604,000

51,472,000

60,953,000

Southend-on-Sea

15,107,000

15,810,000

19,076,000

21,469,000

Suffolk

41,529,000

43,991,000

50,159,000

57,750,000

Thurrock

11,076,000

10,574,000

11,475,000

13,926,000

1 Includes planned expenditure on the provision for pupils with statements and the provision for non-statemented pupils with SEN, support for inclusion, inter authority recoupment, fees for pupils at independent special schools and abroad, educational psychology service, local authority functions in relation to child protection, therapies and other health related services, parent partnership, guidance and information, the monitoring of SEN provision and inclusion administration, assessment and co-ordination. Also included is the funding delegated to nursery, primary and secondary schools identified as “notional SEN” and the individual schools budget (ISB) for special schools.

2 The ISB for special schools will include some general education costs for pupils with SEN in addition to those costs specifically for SEN while the figures recorded against “notional SEN” are only indicative of the amount that might by spent by schools on SEN and, from 2004-05 onwards, “notional SEN” delegated to nursery schools was reported on section 52 for the first time (nursery schools “notional SEN” accounts for £687,000, £885,000, £1,018,000 and £1,045,000 of the respective 2004-05, 2005-06, 2006-07 and 2007-08 East of England totals). In 2005-06, 2006-07 and 2007-08 local authorities in the East of England also budgeted £55.8 million, £58.4 million and £60.1 million for SEN transport expenditure but this is not included in the above table as figures are not available prior to 2005-06.

3 2007-08 data are subject to change by the local authority.

Notes:

1. Figures are rounded to the nearest thousand pounds and may not sum due to rounding.

2. Cash terms figures (see note 1) as reported by local authorities as at 16 October 2007.

3. The data are drawn from local authorities Section 52 Budget Statements (tables 1 and 2) submitted to the DFES. Data are not available prior to 2000-01.

Youth Services: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many youth projects in each London constituency received central Government funding in each of the last five years; and how much was allocated to youth projects in London in each of the last five years, broken down by constituency. (158843)

The Department for Children, Schools and Families does not hold information relating to volumes of projects or financial information relating to constituencies. The following tables show London borough allocations from 2003-04 for centrally managed programmes which fund youth projects in the local areas. These are Positive Activities for Young People (PAYP) holiday provision, the Neighbourhood Support Fund allocations from 2006-07 (prior to this NSF was administered by managing agents and the LA breakdown is not known), and from 2006-07 the new Youth Opportunity and Youth Capital Funds (YOF/YCF).

PAYP local authority allocations 2003-07

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

Central London

Camden

368,059

368,059

651,864

502,086

502,086

Islington

368,503

368,503

652,635

502,680

502,680

Kensington and Chelsea

224,578

224,578

414,779

319,475

319,475

Lambeth

422,109

422,109

726,689

559,718

559,718

Southwark

413,861

413,861

749,156

577,023

577,023

Wandsworth

214,883

214,883

406,609

313,183

313,183

Westminster, City of

400,828

400,828

704,963

542,984

542,984

Total

2,412,821

2,412,821

4,306,694

3,317,148

3,317,148

London East

Barking and Dagenham

271,392

271,392

469,076

361,297

361,297

Bexley

74,163

74,163

188,891

145,490

145,490

Greenwich

353,860

353,860

589,107

453,748

453,748

Hackney

474,752

474,752

765,209

589,387

589,387

Havering

25,655

25,655

161,842

124,656

124,656

Lewisham

447,535

447,535

751,016

578,455

578,455

London, City of

1,103

1,103

56,013

43,143

43,143

Newham

587,783

587,783

977,508

752,907

752,907

Redbridge

56,767

56,767

168,311

129,639

129,639

Tower Hamlets

520,237

520,237

819,564

631,253

631,253

Total

2,813,247

2,813,247

4,946,537

3,809,975

3,809,975

London West

Brent

335.427

335,427

657,909

506,741

506,741

Ealing

114,286

114,286

271,388

209,031

209,031

Hammersmith and Fulham

237,930

237,930

444,946

342,711

342,711

Harrow

75,959

75,959:

170,123

131,034

131,034

Hillingdon

101,438<